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Full text of "Chestnut Burr, 1948"

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1948 CHESTNUT BURR 







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N the darkness the columns move on, 
lowly, feeling the way, 
Unsure, 
Unsafe, 
In the darkness. 

The columns move on. 

Men in long lines advancing together. 

The seekers in line 

After the leaders; 

Wise men in lines 

Following philosophers; 

Philosophers following martyrs : 

All in the darkness, 

The columns move. 

On: round and round. 

But always returning to the path — 

Always upward. 

Shadows grow shorter 

As the columns move on in the darkness. 

- - - Frank Carioti, Jr. 
"LEARNERS IN LINES" 




Richard Birkner 



1948 EDITION 



Chestnut Burr 

<^titJient Ljentboak (^r 

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY 
Kent, Ohio 




Annual Publication by the Student Body of Kent State University 

Frank Carioti, Jr., Editor 
Robert Magee, Business Manager 



PREFACE 



A LTHOUGH the processes of education have changed greatly since the days of 
-^ ■*- the august philosophers of Greece and Rome, its elementary concepts are today 
as universal and fundamental in scope as they were centuries ago. Men still approach 
the realization of ultimate truth through a process of following and leading — the 
students following the teachers, who in their turn are led by the philosophers — 
each in his way moving toward a common goal. 

With world culture in a confused state, the student seeker in the United States 
finds himself in the unique position of having at his disposal hundreds of the finest 
educational institutions in the world. These colleges and universities in their physi- 
cal aspects alone, however, do not disclose the secret of this reality for which he 
searches, or dictate its fulfillment. To find this is an individual process which draws 
in its course on not only class-room procedures but from associations and inter- 
pretaiions of campus activities. Indeed, there has been no mortal being to transfer 
its concept to the printed sheet, or voice its reality from the rostrum without a con- 
trary voice to disclaim his view. 

So the search goes on. At Kent State University, as well as at all other well springs 
of learning, there are the seekers and the leaders. The ambitious will dip deep to fill 
his cup and drink according to his capacity. The well has no bottom and the fee is the 
same for a heavy draught as for a sip. 

The environment of this campus, among the most beautiful in the country, has 
given direction to the study of a steadily increasing enrollment. For these seekers — 
both the followers and the leaders — the 1948 Chestnut Burr staff has attempted to 
record as accurately as possible the beauties of the campus and the highlights of the 
year's events. As each class in its turn advances they will look back to the year 
1947-48 recorded here as one portion of the journey "as the columns move on in 
the darkness." 



PRODUCTION STAFF 

EDITORIAL 

Editor Frank Carioti, Jr. 

Associate Editor Marion Cole 

Photographic Editor Richard Arnold 

Art Editor Harlan McGrail 

Section Editors: 

The Highlights Audrie Fornshell The Fraternities Anne Domiter 

The Student Body Eleanor Meck The Sports Year Philip A. Dempsey 

Photographic Secretary Terry Pugliese 

General Secretary Stella Totten Trautz 

Editorial Staff: 

Bruce Brooks, Marion Del Vecchio, Robert Lengacher, Sue Liebermann, Joe Messersmith, Marilyn 
Patzwahl, Lee Sproat, Edward Trautz. 
Photographic Staff: 

Roger Baele, Doris Carpenter, Gordon Goldsmith, Robert Kidd, Robert Phillips, Ernest Rowland, 
John Stage. 
Art Staff: 

Susan Fletcher, Julian Kofsky, Richard Rice, Ruthann Shelar. 

BUSINESS 

Business Manager Robert Magee 

Business Staff: Mary Lou Johnson, David Kaplan, Irene Kelbaugh, John Laurenson, Betty_\Vinter. 



CONTENTS 



THE CAMPUS VIEWS 8 

THE ADMINISTRATION 26 

State Officials 28 

Board of Trustees 29 

Deans 30 

Administration officials 32 

School heads and faculty 33 

Department heads and faculty 34 

Administration assistants 40 

THE HIGHLIGHTS (see alphabetical index) 42 

THE STUDENT BODY 92 

Graduate school 94 

Seniors 98 

Alumni association 115 

Juniors 116 

Sophomores 132 

Freshmen 140 

THE FRATERNITIES 144 

Sororities 146 

Pan Hellenic council 162 

Interfraternity council 163 

Fraternities 164 

THE SPORTS YEAR 180 

Baseball 182 

Track 183 

Swimming 184 

Golf 185 

Gym team 185 

Wrestling 186 

Football 190 

Basketball 200 

Men's intramurals 206 

Women's intramurals 208 

THE ORGANIZATIONS 210 

Honoraries 212 

Music 222 

Student government 228 

Religious 231 

Publications 236 

Special interest 241 

THE ADVERTISERS 252 

For easy reference to students, faculty, activities, and organizations, an 
alphabetical index appears at the beginning of the advertising section. 



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Richard Arnold 




uiLJiuiqA ttte LLke cLatlie^ tkat make lite iiiclh! 

On a college campus, buildings somehow seem to mirror the basic 
qualities of an ever-changing cosmopolitan student body. As student dress, 
taste and methods of education change, so does the appearance of the uni- 
versity. 

Among Kent State's ten permanent buildings and many temporary 
structures are found reflections of 6,200 student temperaments . . . modern 
efficiency of McGilvrey and Engleman . . . nostalgic memories suggested 
by ivy-pillared Merrill and Kent, Lowry and Moulton . . . practical in- 
genuity of the industrial arts plant . . . stately classicism of Rockwell Librar}', 
the hub of campus lanes . . . 

. . . And, most characteristic, the amazing adaptability of modern 
students as likened to the temporary student center and men's dormitories, 
converted from army barracks. Where there is progress in learning, architects' 
plans are never far behind. 



Campus Scene 




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From the beauty land Ohio 
comes our universal praise. 

'Tis the song of Alma Mater 

that her sons and daughters raise. 



John Stage 



10 



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'Tis a hail to Kent forever, 
on the Cuyahoga shore. 

Shouted by the loving thousands 
as they sing it o'er and o'er. 



Richard Arnold 



12 




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Hail to Thee, our Alma Mater, 
O, how beautiful thou art, 



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High enthroned upon the hilltop, 
Reigning over ev'ry heart. 



Frank Carioti, Jr. 



16 



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From the hilltop Alma Mater, 
gazing on her portal wide. 

Sees the coming generations 
as they throng to seek her side. 



frank Carioti, Jr. 



18 








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Seek her side to win her blessings, 
throng her gates to hear her name. 

Leave her gates to sing her praise; 
go afar to spread her fame. 



Frank Carioti, Jr. 



20 




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Hail to Thee, our Alma Mater, 

O, how young and strong thou art, 



Ernest Rowland 



11 



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Planning for the glorious future, 
Firm enthroned in ev'ry heart. 



Richer. I Arnold 











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Frank Carioti, Jr. 




tae cr^. u^^awnian — j:Ltit citiTen c-r the campt 



Three hundred years ago, Francis Bacon described a scholar by writing, 
"Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact 
man." 

Approaching fulfillment of this ideal definition of a scholar is Dr. George 
A. Bowman, University President. As a student of education at Western 
Reserve, Columbia, Chicago and Harvard Universities, he read widely to 
achieve a broad background for his teaching. In conferences with his faculty 
and students. Dr. Bowman has been noted for his sincerity and unprejudiced 
consideration of suggestions for improving the University. 

With his unusual infinite understanding, the President has written of 
the University which he guides: "With confidence in herself, with faith in 
her future, and with the courage to carry through, Kent State has entered 
upon the road leading toward fulfillment of her real destiny." 



Administration 



27 




AW.. \^ 

Proposed Men's Dormirory 



Governor Thomas J. Herbert 
Dr. Clyde Hissong 



STATE OFFICIALS 



"PEARLY in the chilly fall quarter, hundreds of students 
■^ braved Ohio winds to huddle on the outskirts of Kent 
State's first post-war construction project. Students took a 
personal interest in the much-heralded new buildings — the 
first since 1940 — as they watched President Bowman sink 
the ground-breaking shovel; and interest continued 
throughout the winter as huge old trees were wrenched 
from the ground, to be replaced by brick and mortar. 

Dozens of workmen did the actual digging and hauling, 
but two men little known by students were largely respon- 
sible for the many improvements this year. Governor 
Thomas J. Herbert and Dr. Clyde Hissong, state director of 
education, have been behind the University's material prog- 
ress. Because of their help, the Ohio State Legislature 
granted funds necessary to keep KSU in step with the state 
and nation-wide program to further higher education. 



Improvements began during the fall quarter with a thirty 
per cent increase in faculty, bringing the total to nearly 250 
full-time professors. 

Building projects were more in the spotlight, however. 
While students were enjoying afternoon snacks and dance 
sessions in the temporary Hub, the two foresighted state 
leaders helped authorize money for a larger, permanent 
student center-classroom building. Construction also began 
on a men's dormitory, men's health and physical educa- 
tion building, a hospital, and a laboratory for arts, home 
economics, and business students. 

Although they never will personally make use of these 
new buildings. Governor Herbert and Dr. Hissong have 
taken enough interest in Kent State's development to insure 
proper facilities for coming generations of students. 



28 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



ClX prominent Ohio educators gather each 
month in the dignified office of President Bow- 
man to decide the future of the University. 

These men comprise the Board of Trustees, re- 
sponsible for all important changes in Kent State 
personnel, curricula and in general operating pro- 
cedure. Re-elected President of the Board this fall 
was John R. Williams, who served with Joseph B. 
Hanan, vice president, Robert C. Dix, secretary, 
and Dr. Otto J. Korb, treasurer. 

Five of the six Board members are appointed, one 
for each year, for a five-year period of service. The 
sixth trustee is the state director of education, an 
ex-officio Board member. 

Members of the Board of Trustees and the years in 
which their present terms expire are: 

John R. Williams, Madison 1948 

Robert C. Dix, Kent 1949 

Dr. Clyde Hissong, Columbus (ex-officio) 1949 

Dr. Otto J. Korb, East Cleveland 1950 

Dr. Charles H. Lake, Cleveland 1951 

Joseph B. Hanan, Akron 1952 



Inset: John R Williams, President of the Board 
Seated: Joseph B. Hanan, Otto J. Korb, President George A Bowman, Robert C. Dix, Charles H Lake 




Proposed Student Center 




29 





^T rHEN Dean Arden L. Allyn came to the Uni- 
versity in 1934, the College of Business 
Administration was practically unnoticed in a 
school dominated by students preparing for teach- 
ing careers. 

In the last dozen years, however, the business 
curriculum has earned a place of its own, with 
fifteen major fields of study possible now, and a 
local chapter of the largest professional business 
honorary in the world. 

As the reputation of the BA college has pros- 
pered in outside business circles, so has respect in- 
creased for Professor Allyn, only pre-war academic 
dean still serving KSU in that capacity. 

Dr. John Reed Spicer came to Kent State from 
the dean's chair of Westminster, an old scholarly 
college in Western Pennsylvania, bringing with 
him the personal interest in his students usually 
associated only with small schools. 

As Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, Dr. 
Spicer has made every effort to accommodate the 
several thousand students who account for the arts 
college lead in enrollment at Kent State. 

Recognizing the need for more thoroughly train- 
ed students in graduate schools. Dean Spicer has 
particularly concentrated this year on improve- 
ment of the pre-professional curricula in his college. 

Scores of years ago the founder of a neighboring 
university lost a buggy wheel in the mire near the 
Cuyahoga River, where Kent State now stands. 
The wheel was recovered, painted a bright blue and 
gold, and set up as a football trophy between the 
two schools. 

Known for his ingenuity in establishing this and 
similarly imaginative traditions is genial Raymond 
E. Manchester, Dean of Men since 1920. Scarcely 
resembling the stern, old-fashioned prototype dean, 
he himself has become one of the traditions of the 
University as the result of his efforts to encourage 
good sportsmanship and study. 



30 



A N S 



A LTHOUGH Kent State is no longer the coun- 
try school teachers' mill it was twenty years 
ago. Dean Robert I. White of the College of Edu- 
cation has recognized KSU's ever-important role in 
supplying urgently needed Ohio teachers. 

Trained in the progressive methods of the 
University of Chicago, Dr. White has departmen- 
talized his school in order to place more teachers in 
the best metropolitan school systems. 

Nevertheless he has maintained the teacher train- 
ing program which has provided basic experience 
to Kent State graduates now teaching in every 
county and large city of northeastern Ohio. 

"Dean of Summer School and Extension" once 
meant teaching vacationing school marms and a 
handful of evening students in neighboring coun- 
ties. 

Since he came to Kent State in 1924, kindly Dean 
Fren Musselman has enlarged this position into a 
full-time job involving thousands of serious stu- 
dents in all colleges of the University. 

Dean Musselman has reorganized summer ses- 
sions to cater to veterans and others on accelerated 
programs. The extension school under his guidance 
this year includes eight hundred students and a full- 
time faculty at Kent State University Canton, 
which offers freshman and sophomore college 
work. 

Many a Kent State woman visiting neighboring 
colleges has been surprised at strict hours and regu- 
lations observed by undergraduate coeds. 

Recognized for her liberal, modern point of 
view. Dr. Ada V. Hyatt has preserved for KSU 
women the freedom she believes they are capable of 
using wisely. 

As Dean of Women Dr. Hyatt has concentrated 
this year on introduction of highest-ranking na- 
tional sororities to the campus, while supervising 
reorganization of rushing and pledging practices. 
She also has worked closely with off-campus house- 
mothers for the best in rooming facilities. 




31 




ADMINISTRATIVE 
OFFICIALS 



npIMID freshmen are sometimes petrified by the gruff 
remarks of Registrar E. C. Stopher, but to many a 
graduate he is the most well-remembered and very often one 
of the best liked professors. 

With an almost fabulous memory for names and faces of 
former students. Professor Stopher has been instrumental in 
getting Kent graduates in and out of college since KSU's 
early days of 1916. 



To several hundred working students and faculty mem- 
bers, the name Paul E. Beck is little more than a signature 
on a monthly pay-check; but in his capacity as comptroller 
Professor Beck is responsible for more money than even the 
mythical king in his counting house. 

All University expenditures, from a ten-cent typewriter 
eraser to the $800,000 student center building, are super- 
vised by Professor Beck. 



Working hand-in-hand with the Comptroller is Emil 
Berg, KSU Business Manager who keeps the machinery for 
producing scholars well-oiled. 

In charge of the problem of how and where to spend Uni- 
versity funds. Professor Berg was busy this year contracting 
for the new campus buildings and furnishings, setting up 
new divisions like the photostating department, and seeing 
that academic offices were well-stocked with supplies. 



Even the problems connected with operating a University 
in a high school building in mid-downtown Canton have 
not fazed Clayton M. Schindler, director of Kent State 
University Canton. 

Professor Schindler knows most of the eight hundred 
students at the extension school, and spends much of his 
time encouraging them personally to continue their edu- 
cation after completing the two-year curricula at KSUC. 



CLAYTON M. SCHINDLER 



32 



SCHOOL HEADS 
AND FACULTY 



ART 



Elmer L. Novotny, M.A. 

Professor, School Head 
PAUL J. BAUS 



NINA S. HUMPHREY, M.A. 
THELMA HYLAND, M.A. 



Inslruclor 
Professor 
Assistant Professor 



HAROLD C. KITNER, M.A. 
ROBERT MORROW 
WILBUR W. WEST, M.A. 



htslruclor 

V:siri/tg Artist 

Associate Professor 



JOURNALISM 



William Taylor, M.A. 

Professor, School Head 

HENRY C. BECK, B.S. 

Instructor 
ALFRED A. CROWELL, M.S.J. 

Associate Professor 

JAMES A. FOSDICK, M.S.J. 

Assistant Professor 



MURRAY POWERS 

Part-Time Lecturer 

MICHAEL J. RADOCK, M.S.J. 

Associate professor 

CARLETON J. SMYTH, B.LITT. 

Assistant Professor 



MUSIC 



Fred H. Denker, M.M. 

Professor. School Head 

MRS. BARBARA C. BYLER. B.M. 

Temporary Instructor 
KENNETH BYLER, M.M. 

Assistant Professor 
CARO M. CARAPETYAN, M.A. 

Associate Professor 
A. L. DITTMER, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
MRS. IRENE G. DRAKE 

Assistant Professor 
MARTIN HEYLMAN, B.S. 

Part-Time Instructor 



ELFLEDA LITTLEJOHN, M.S. 

Associate Professor 



ROY D. METCALF, M.A. 



ERWIN MIERSCH 



HAROLD E. MILES. M.A. 



Associate Professor 



Part-Time Instructor 



Associate Professor 



FLORENCE SUBLETTE. M.A. 



DWIGHT WELDY, B.S. 



Part-Time Instructor 



ALFRED ZETZER, B.MUS. 



Part-Time Instructor 



SPEECH 



E. Turner Stump, M.A. 

Professor, School Head 
WALTON D. CLARKE, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Associate Professor 



WESLEY W. EGAN, B.A. 
ELEANOR GRAY, M.A. 
JAMES N. HOLM, PH.M. 



E. GAIL JEFFREY, B.S. 
ROBERT L. KENT, B.A. 
MURIEL K. LEWIS, M.A. 



Assistant Instructor 

Assistant Professor 

Instructor 



JOHN B. MONTGOMERY, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
G. HARRY WRIGHT, M.A. 




ELMER L NOVOTNY 




WILLIAM TAYLOR 




E. TURNER STUMP 



33 




ALICE H. HALEY 




DEPARTMENT HEAD 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



F. Dewey Amner, Ph.D. 

Professor, Department Head 

MRS. MARY W. DEVOLLD, M.A. 

Instructor 

WALTER L. DEVOLLD, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 

ROBERT H. ESSER, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
MME. JEANNE GILBERT 

Instructor 
MRS. ELGITHA M. HAUSER, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
ISABELLE HAZEN, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
JOHN R. HIPPLE, B.S. 

Instructor 
CHARLES F. KIRK, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 



HAROLD E. LIONETTI, B.A. 
HELEN W. MACHAN, M.A. 



Instructor 



Associate Professor 
WILLIAM G. MEINKE, PH.D. 

Professor 
HAZEL M. MESSIMORE, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
BERNARD MIKOFSKY, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
ERNESTO MONTENEGRO 

Visiting Associate Professor 
MRS. HELENE T. MOUGIN 

Part-Time Instructor 



ALBERTO PAMIES, ED.D. 



EUNICE E. SAXE, B.A. 



Assistant Professor 



HOME ECONOMICS 



Alice H. Haley, M. Ed. 

Professor, Department Head 

MRS. ESTHER M. GRAY 

Instructor 
NONA I. JORDAN, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 



ELIZABETH E. MOOMAW, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
ALICE E. RYDER, PH.D. 

Associate Professor 

ERNESTINE WILLIAMS, M.A. 



Assistant Professor 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



John B. Nicholson, Jr., M.A. 

Professor, Department Head 

THOMAS F. GARDNER, M.A. 

( Deceased ) Instructor 



JOHN M. GOUDEAU, M.S. 
DOROTHY M. GREEN, M.A. 



Instructor 
Instructor 



COMMERCE 

C. C. Kochenderfer, D.CS. raymond k. moran, m.a. 

Professor, Department Head Assistant Professor 



VICTOR P. GRAVEREAU, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 

JOHN L. HAZARD, M.B.A. 

Temporary Assistant Professor 



CHARLES A. TAFF, M.A. 



Assistant Professor 



MERLE E. WAGONER, M.A. 



Associate Professor 



C. C. KOCHENDERFER 



34 



ND FACULTY 



ENGLISH 



Chester E. Satterfield, M.A. 

Professor, Department Head 

FLORENCE G. BEALL, PH.D. 

Professor 

Assistant Professor 

Instructor 

Assistant Professor 

Associate Professor 

Assistant Professor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Professor 

Associate Professor 

Assistant Professor 



LAURA HILL, M.A. 
RUTH HOOVER, M.A. 



THOMAS M. H. BLAIR, M.A, 
CHARLOTTE L. DAVIS, M.A 
DOROTHY V. DILES, M.A. 
ARTHUR E. DUBOIS, PH.D. 
SARAH DUNNING, M.A. 
HILDA J. ELLIS, M.A. 
JEAN N. FRIES, M.A. 
W. LESLIE GARNETT, PH.D. 
ERIC T. GRIEBLING, M.A. 
REGINA E. HANWAY, M.A. 



Associate Professor 



Assistant Professor 

Instructor 
HARLAN M. HUNGERFORD M A. 

Associate Professor 
ADA V. HYATT, PH.D. 

EDWARD H. PAKE, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
VIRGINIA C. FERRYMAN, M A. 

Assistant Professor 
ARTHUR J. PRESCOTT, B 9 

Temporary Instructor 

KENNETH R. PRINGLE, PH.D. 



JOHN R. SPICER, FDD. 
MARGARET STOPHER. M.A. 
ROLLAND L. VOTH, M.S. 
WELDON M. WILLIAMS, PH.D. 



Professor 
Professor 
Instructor 
Instructor 
Professor 



SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 



Elizabeth M. Lewis, M.S. 

Associate Professor, Department Head 
MARIAN DARST, B.S. 

Temporary Instructor 



MARCELLINE PLESCHER, M.S. 



George K. Schoepfle, Ph.D. 

Professor, Department Head 
HAROLD H. LOUDIN, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 



PHYSICS 

JAMES W. MCGRATH. PH.D. 



Associate Professor 



WILLIAM R. PAINE. B.S. 



Temporary Instruc'.or 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Marion Van Campen, Ed.D. ^^^^ musselman, m.a. 

Professor, Departmetit Head 
EVELYN E. KENT, M.ED. JANET C. REES. M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
SUSANNE M, KOEHLER, M.A. 

Associate Professor 



Professor 
Assistant Professor 




35 




DEPARTMENT HEAD< 



MATHEMATICS 



Lloyd L. Lowenstein, Ph.D. 

Professor, Department Head 

FOSTER L. BROOKS, PH.D. 

Professor 

EMALOU BRUMFIELD, B.A. 

hislructOT 



PAUL L. EVANS. M.S. 

Assistant Professor 
FRANCES HARSHBARGER, PH.D. 

Professor 
EMERSON D. JENKINS, PH.D. 

Associate Professor 



MARVIN L, JOHNSON, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
JOHN W. LAISER, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
RAYMOND E. MANCHESTER. M.A. 

Professor 
EMMA J. OLSON, PH.D. 

Associate Professor 
ROBERT PALMQUIST, M.A. 



EMORY G. TARR, M.A, 



Instructor 
Instructor 



Alfred W. Stewart, Ph.D. 

Professor. Department Head 

DWIGHT L. ARNOLD, PH.D. 

Professor 
BALLARD I. BRADY, M.A. 

Associate Professor 

Assistant Professor 

Professor 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

ALVIN J. MILLER, M.A, 



Assistant Professor 
LESTER H, MUNZENMAYER. PH.D. 



GEORGE H. COOKE, M.A. 
AMOS L. HEER, PH.D. 



GERALD READ, M.A, 

S. MARTHA ROBBINS, M.S. 

EMMET C. STOPHER, M.A. 



Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Assistant Professor 

Professor 



ACCOUNTING 



Herbert W. Wilber, M.S. 

Professor, Department Head 
WILLIAM F. CONWAY, M.B.A. 

Professor 



THEODORE D. KRUM, M.ED. 



Associate Professor 



SMITH H. LINE, B.S. 
DONALD D. LUCK, M.B.A. 
CHARLES J. STORKAN, B.A. 



Instructor 

Instructor 
Instructor 



KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY EDUCATION 



G. Hazel Swan, M.A. 

Professor, Department Head 



OLIVE WOODRUFF, PH.D. 



G. HAZEL SWAN 



36 



^ND FACULTY 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Frank E. Ballenger 

Professor, Department Head 

HARRY C. ADAMS, M.A. 

InslTuctOT 

Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Associate Professor 

Instructor 

Professor 
FLORENCE M. HELLMAN, MA. 

Assistant Professor 
ELIZABETH A. LEGGETT, M.D. 

Associate Professor 



GEORGE J. ALTMAN, M.ED, 
MRS. MARIE H. APPLE. M.A, 
JOSEPH BEGALA, M.A. 
KARL G. CHESNUTT, B.S. 
ARVILLE O. DE^-EESE, M.D, 



GEORGE M. LYNN 



ELEANOR MELLERT, B.S. 



VICTOR M. MOORE, B.S. 



TREVOR J. REES, M.A. 



FRANCES SHAW, M.D. 



BEVERLY L. SIEDEL. M.S. 



Associate Professor 



Associate Professor 



WESLEY C. STEVENS. B.P.E. 



BERTHA WHITTON. M.A. 



Assistant Professor 



HISTORY 



A. Sellew Roberts, Ph.D. 

Professor, Department Head 

MAURY D. BAKER, PH.D. 

Assistant Professor 
SHERMAN B. BARNES, PH.D. 

Associate Professor 
GERTRUDE LAWRENCE, PH.D. 

Professor 
LEON S. MARSHALL, PH.D. 

Associate Professor 



JOHN D. POPA, B.A. 

Assistant Professor 
PHILIP R. SHRIVER, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
WILLIAM L. WANNEMACHER. PH.D. 

Professor 

HENRY N. WHITNEY, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



H. D. Byrne, J.D. 

Professor, Department Head 



EARL W. CRECRAFT, LL.D. 
MONA FLETCHER, M.A. 



Professor 
Professor 



LOUIS K. HARRIS, M.A. 



OSCAR H. IBELE, PH.D. 



Instructor 
Assistant Professor 



PHILOSOPHY 



Maurice Baum, Ph.D. 

Professor, Department Head 



JOSEPH POLITELLA, PH.D. 



Associate Professor 




MAURICE BAUM 



37 




RALEIGH DRA<i 




DEPARTMENT HEADS 



SOCIOLOGY 



James T. Laing, Ph.D. 

Professor, Department Head 

JOHN H. GIVEN, B.A. 

Temporary Instructor 
GEORGE MASTERTON, M.A. 

Instructor 



OSCAR W. RITCHIE, M.A. 
KENNETH W. YEAGER, M.A. 



Instructor 
Instructor 



ECONOMICS 



Hersel W. Hudson, Ph.D. 

Professor, Department Head 

MRS. GLADYS M. BREWER, M.S. 

Part-Time Instructor 
JOHN C. BREWER, M.S. 

Assistant Professor 



HAROLD M. ESWINE, M.A. 

Associate Professor 
DOUGLAS W. MORRILL, M.A. 



GEORGE H. COCHRAN, M.A. 



CHARLES W. OMER, M.A. 



KARL F. TRECKEL, M.A. 



Associate Professor 



Associate Professor 



C. STANLEY COREY, M.A. 



Professor 



Assistant Professor 
WILLIAM J. WEISKOPF, M.A. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



Raleigh Drake, Ph.D. 

Professor, Department Head 
RAYMOND M, CLARK, PH.D. 



MRS. EDNA R. OSWALT, PH.D. 



FREDERICK E. DAVIDSON, M.ED. 



Professor 

Instructor 
MRS. IDABELLE HOOSE, M.A. 

Temporary Instructor 
CHARLES L. LANGSAM, M.D. 

Part-Time Assistant Professor 



DANIEL W. PEARCE, PH.D. 

( Deceased ) 
CHARLES C. PERKINS, PH.D. 

MARY J. REHDER, M.A. 



Professor 
Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Instructor 



CHARLES N. WINSLOW, PH.D. 

Associate Professor 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Donald Anthony, Ph.D. 

Professor, Department Head 
PAUL E. BECK, LL.B. 

Assistant Professor 
EUGENE BIGLER, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
LOUIS S. BOFFO, B.S. 

Instructor 

WILLIAM C. DARRAH, M.S. 

Assistant Professor 



LAWRENCE W. DIXON, M.LITT. 

Associate Professor 

ARDIN E. HAYS, M.B.A. 

Associate Professor 

STANLEY C. MILLER, M.ED. 

Assistant Professor 

FRANCIS G. MULL, M.S. 

Assistant Professor 



DONALD ANTHONY 



38 



AND FACULTY 



GEOGRAPHY 



Hallock F. Raup, Ph.D. 

Professor, Department Head 

JAMES R. BECK, PH.D. 

Professor 

Associate Professor 



CARLETON N. SAVAGE, M.S. 



EVELYN G. WESTON, M.A. 



EDNA E. EISEN, M.S. 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



Dewey F. Barich, M.A. 

Professor, Department Head 

AURILIEN J. BELANGER, M.A. 

Associate Professor 
GEORGE BOWERS, M.S. 

Assistant Professor 
JOHN W. DIRKSON 

Part-Time Assistant Professor 
MARTIN O. JOHNSEN, M.A. 

CHARXES J. KESSLER, M.ED. 



Assistant Professor 



Assistant Professor 



OLIVER C. LUEY, B.S. 

Associate Professor 
FRANK A. MARSCHIK, M.S. 

Assistant Professor 
JOSEPH F. MORBITO, M.ED. 

Associate Professor 
DELMAR W. OLSON, M.A. 

Associate Professor 
ANDREW W. PATON, B.S. 

Associate Professor 
ELBERT W. TISCHENDORF, M.A. 

Professor 



CHEMISTRY 



Will S. Thompson, Ph.D. 

Professor, Department Head 

GEORGE L. BUSH, ED.D. 

Associate Professor 
J. CLEVE CARROLL, PH.D. 

Associate Professor 
GERALD H. CHAPMAN, PH.D. 

Professor 
CLARENCE L. COOK, M.S. 

Associate Professor 



JEANETTE LITTLEJOHN, M.S. 
JOHN R. LONG, PH.D. 



Assistant Professor 



MAURICE B. PALMER, PH.D. 



EARL SCHUMAKER, M.S. 



Associate Professor 



Assistant Professor 



Harry A. Cunningham, Ph.D. 

Professor, Department Head 

DORCAS J. ANDERSON, M.S. 

Assistant Professor 
RALPH W. DEXTER, PH.D. 

Associate Professor 
GEORGE R. EASTERLING, M.A. 

Assistant Professor 
J. ARTHUR HERRICK, PH.D. 

Associate Professor 
CLINTON H. HOBBS, PH.D. 

Assistant Professor 



BIOLOGY 

KENNETH L. KELLEY, PH.D. 



Professor 
MRS. LILLIAN J. RAUP, M.A. 

Temporary Part-Time Instructor 
ELIZABETH W. SMITH, PH.D. 

Assistant Professor 
CHARLES B. SUMNER, PH.D. 

Associate Professor 
PETER J. ZUCCHERO, PH.D. 

Associate Professor 




HALLOCK F. RAUP 




DEWEY F. BARICH 




39 




ADMINISTRATION 



SINCE she came to Kent State two years ago, S. Martha 
Robbins has been working to bring national sororities to 
the campus. She is greatly responsible for the several national 
social groups already active at KSU, and, as Assistant Dean of 
Women, has charge of rushing activities. 

Lieut. Col. Thomas Wall created a great deal of comment 
when he came to Kent last fall, being the only man in uni- 
form on campus. But it wasn't long until he was joined by the 
members of his ROTC unit in full swing. Working efficiently, 
the commanding officer had his KSU army ready for its full 
dress review early in the winter term. 

Ordering, preparing and serving meals to seven hundred 
coeds is a full-time job, but the chore of feeding an additional 
250 men at Terrace Lodge was added this year to the duties of 
Ernestine Williams, Head Dietician. She nevertheless man- 
aged to continue to serve full-course meals twenty times a 
week to dorm residents as well as cash patrons. 

Alfred A. Crowell is responsible for publication of the 
yellow-bound general catalog which becomes a standard ref- 
erence on the KSU student bookshelf. In addition to the three 
hundred page annual bulletin, Professor Crowell publishes 
many leaflets for individual departments. 

Job-hunting is never fun, especially during depression 
decades, but Dr. Lester Munzenmayer has helped many a KSU 
graduate to a top-ranking position. As director of the place- 
ment bureau, he keeps complete files on every former Stater 
and often assists undergraduates in finding part-time jobs be- 
tween classes. 

Keeping house for a family of 918 students, all residents of 
campus dormitories, is the big responsibility of petite Mrs. 
Rhema Fair, Director of Residences. She also provides rooms 
for off-campus students and aids commuters with their trans- 
portation problems. 



ALFRED A. CROWELl 




LESTER MUNZENMAYER 



RHEMA FAIR 



40 



ASSISTANTS 



T7IRST Assistant Dean of Men at KSU was Harold Sauer, 
-*- who came to Kent from Ohio State University. In addition 
to being chief consultant of veteran students, he worked with 
inter-fraternity council in establishing policies which opened 
the doors to national men's Greek groups. 

As University Examiner, Charles Atkinson is responsible 
for admission of each new student to KSU. This involves eval- 
uating credits from high schools and other colleges, as well as 
consulting with students as they progress from one division 
to another toward graduation. 

Each time Kent State is mentioned in print or on the air, 
the news probably emanated from Michael Radock's public 
relations office. With a staff of student assistants, he sends 
general, home town, sports and feature stories and pictures to 
publications and radio stations throughout Ohio and the entire 
nation. 

The link between classroom needs and availability of ma- 
terials is provided by Larry Wooddell, who as Superintendent 
of Maintenance sees that supplies are brought from the ware- 
house, makes sure rooms are kept clean, and issues permits 
for ambitious workers to stay in the building overtime. Some 
two hundred men are in his charge. 

Preserving the quiet authoritative atmosphere of the ad- 
ministration office is Mrs. Alice Makinson, Secretary to the 
President. With her help, students and faculty communicate 
their problems to the President without personally interrupting 
the campus chief executive. 

As Director of Teacher Training, Dr. Amos Heer tries to 
insure a sound practical background for every student gradu- 
ating from the College of Education. Through his system of 
practice teaching on the campus, young educators gain this ex- 
perience as part of their regular class work. 




MICHAEL RADOCK 




AMOS HEER 



41 



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Th 



L 



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Fr<j»i Carioti, Jr. 




akt ualuA btLna out ItLaltUalttA or tlte uea'c. 



Text books and term papers have their place at Kent State, but now 
and then the studious hush of Rockwell Library ends early and study lamps 
make way for brilliant auditorium spotlights. 

From one Campus Night week-end to another, the schedule of extra- 
curricular activities is crammed with exciting theater productions, with 
dances which reveal the beauty of campus queens, and with keen compe- 
tition in acting, in song, in decorations, and even in rowing prowess. 

Interwoven with the pattern of gay proms and contests are the more 
serious programs which also are part of college life. Solemn graduation 
ceremonies, "The Messiah," concerts by student musical groups, and lec- 
tures by world leaders — all remain vivid memories long after lights have 
dimmed on final curtain calls. 



Highlights 



43 



^Jm\ k 1 k 1 ■ ■ 



mTE GEORGE APLEY 



A N HOUR before the curtain rose on the first act of the 
-^ ■*-1947 Pork Barrel, early arrivals began to push into the 
university auditorium, and by the time the SRO sign was 
out students were crowding the aisles and hanging over the 
balcony. 

Four hours of entertainment followed, filled by sixteen 
original skits by competitive sorority, fraternity, and independ- 
ent groups, with a generous sprinkling of audience stooges. 
The usual satire on college and social life was sparked with 
an Olson and Johnson display of slapstick, a little ham, and 



some clever acting, with Jim Bullock, Lenny Taylor, and Nick 
Bozeka as emcees. 

Rapid construction of an "outhouse" gained a prize berth 
for the Industrial Arts Club. Other winners were Phi Beta 
Phi's "Fact or Fiction" with Jim Bissett's fast-moving imitation 
of South American jazz; Alpha Xi Delta's "Mass Mutiny" 
highlighted by Lois Musik's sketching of comic page charac- 
ters; and Lowry Hall's aesthetic musical number "Artists' Re- 
verie." Music for the production was supplied by Mike Fried- 
land and his Solituders. 



Carmen Miranda has nothing on the winning wriggle of Phi Beta Phi's Jim 
Bissett . . . Messy, yes, but you should have seen the curtain after this pie-throw- 
ing episode . . . Ollie Schneider, caught in mid-air, during, shall we say, an 
impressionistic dance in KMK's "Shooting of Dan McGrew" . . . Engleman's 
harmony quartet, Lou Vandervort, Colleen and Joy Brand and Carol Shindle- 
decker . . . A capacity house didn't miss a thing. 



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Members of the Apley family sit in reverent silence as Agnes Willing grinds 
out a well-rehearsed tune prompted by her proud father . . . The sewing circle 
and tea afford an opportunity for gossip about the "outside world" . . . "The 
drinking uncle" Roger finds a companion in his pleasure . . . Rebelling children 
prompt George Apley to explain Freudian principles to his wife. 




npHE sedate, exclusive world of pompous George Apley was 
-^ transferred to the University Theater in minute detail for 
the humorous satire of Victorian Boston, "The Late George 
Apley," given during last year's spring term. 

Jim Bullock had the role of the title character in the KauflF- 
man and Marquand hit, directed by Professor G. Harry Wright, 
with graduate student Don Shanower as assistant director. 

Acting in the quiet, stuffy atmosphere of the Apley parlor, 
Dolores Clark was the subdued and proper wife, with Janet 
Gillespie and Bob Stevenson as the rebellious younger genera- 
tion responsible for the minor revolution on Beacon Hill. Sup- 
porting actors were Helen Mitrovka, Lois Dolhar, Marion Lem- 
ponen, Wilbur Adams, and Jim McLean. 



ROWBOAT REGATTA 



O'N the morning of May 24 last spring, KSU stu- 
dents swarmed to the banks of the muddy Cuya- 
hoga at Fred Fuller Park to witness the seventh annual 
Rowboat Regatta, and neithei threatening skies nor 
sulky showers could discourage the enthusiastic crowd. 

Barbara Berg, as queen of KSU's royal navy, 
crowned the winners of the race. Her four attendants 
were Mary Lou Holland, Candy Zilla, Pat Godfrey, 
and Ruth Hoehn. 

"Life" photographer George Scadding covered the 
event, including the pre-race activities. A faculty 
men's race was won by Professors William Form and 
Vic Moore. Stan Mine and Bob Wentz put on a bath- 
tub act, and there was a three-men-in-a-tub skit. A 
special raft carried Mike Friedland and his floating 
swing band. 

Raft-borne Stater reporters were first-hand wit- 
nesses as Dick Kline, rowing alone for Gamma Tm 
Delta, won the fraternity race and Blacksheej^yfohn 
Sackner and Gene Jagman took first place for ih*!^^ 
pendent men. Sorority winners were Agnes Sawyer 
and Evelyn Smith of Alpha Gamma Delta, while 
Berniece Looney and Yvonne Lewandowski won for 
independent women. 



Regatta Queen, Barbara Berg, framed by pictures of the day's activities . 



Lowry's own cheering section 



Elaine Chill can vouch for the 





Cuyahoga . . . Waiting to crown the winners . . . The floating bandstand- . . . 
Wet feet, Ernie? . . . Alpha Gamma Delta winners . . . A natty nautical court 
. Scadding of "Life" photographs the waxing . , How do you do it, "Pop" 
Rub-a-dub-dub, three-men-in-a-tub. 



The paddle-boat comedy act by the Art Club was a big success . . . Bob Hoyt, 
Stater editor, interviews the queen . . , The raft-borne Stater crew, Kenny Gold- 
stein and Bob Blumer, knock off a row by row account of the races. 




11^^. 



"ff 



'l*ls 




CAMPUS DAY 



Winning Alpha Omega merrnaids in a make- 
believe under-waler scene . . . Phi Beta Phi 
promoted the KSU stadium and won the In- 
ter-Fraternity cup. 




May Queen, Mavis Lemons . . . K-girl. Marian Brum applies the first dab of paint . . . 
SC president, Tow Davey, crowns the queen . . . The colorful maypole dance . . . The 
"Roaring Twenties'* of Aloulton Hall's float . . . The fight against intolerance , . . Engle- 
man's winning float . . . The aueen with her court . . . Hopeful contenders wait on 
Lowry's steps . . . KMKs in solemn file . . . Gamma Phi Beta's "wise old owl" . . . 
Alpha Epsilon has confidence in KSU athletes. 




A FTER a full morning of racing activities at the Rowboat 

Regatta, jubilant students returned to the hill — for one 

of the loveliest Campus Day celebrations in Kent State history. 

The KMKs traditional K-painting and presentation of K- 
girl, Marian Brurs, opened a long afternoon of events. On the 
front campus hundreds encircled the maypole dancers during 
their colorful ceremony and throughout the presentation of the 
May Queen, Mavis Lemons. 

Cardinal Key women led the queen contenders in a solemn 
procession from Lowry Hall steps to the lower campus. While 
everyone waited in silent suspense, Smdent Council president, 
Tom Davey, extracted the queen's name from a secret ballot. 
Judgment was made by E. Ladislav Novotony, chairman of the 
school of art, who chose as first and second attendants Mary 
Lou Johnson and Isia Schnauffer. 

The float parade that followed was the culmination of weeks 
of hard work by various campus groups, and was a brilliant dis- 
play of talent and ingenuity. 

Both the Delta Gammas and the AOs used a clever deep-sea 
theme, but it was the AOs'that won the judges' nod. Other 
float themes displayed old-fashioned vehicles, Phigammatheta's 
"Red Menace" float, and Beta Gamma's attractive "flower- 
girls." Phi Beta Phi took fraternity honors for their 'Build A 
Stadium" float and Engleman's "Every Girl A Queen" won first 
place for the Independents. 



49 




A LITTLE weary by now, bu: still in the mood, students 
gathered far in advance around the steps of Merrill Hall 
for the day's last competitive event, the Campus Night Song 
Fest. 

Early twilight and the soft glow of campus streetlights set 
the scene, as sorority and fraternity groups filed to their places 
on the steps of the building. Adding effectively to their ap- 
pearance were the identical outfits worn by the members of 
the various groups. 

Kappa Sigma Chi's heartwarming "Meadowlands" was 
chosen the winning song among fraternities and Gamma Phi 
Beta's exceptional "Begin the Beguine" placed them in the 
winning bracket for sororities. 



Irene Brodbeck directs the AOs in the scene and the song. 'In The Still Of The Ni,ylu' . . Profs Miles and Carapetyan 
judged the event . . . Hundreds gathered for the concert . . . Bob White led the Delts in the "Battle Hymn of the Republic." 




50 



Accompanied by Dick Beckwith and Joe Forris, AOs 
Dona Mae Burkhardl, Betty Rowlen ond Betty Streeter 
admire the Iroptiy for tlieir float. 



Some Gammas and their dates take time out from the 
Campus Night Dance to read the Stoter Compus Day 




A S sunlight turned to darkness. Campus Day changed to 
-^ •*- Campus Night and the cUmaxing festivities got under 
way. Twilight had honored the traditional Song Fest and Wills 
Gym was set for dancing, gay reunion, and the bestowing of 
awards for the activities of the day. 

Outside discarded floats blocked driveways of the Greek 
houses, while inside arms and voices were still tired from 
cheering favorite choices in the morning's Rowboat Rebatta. 
But inside and out, there was no time to pause in the continuity 
of merriment and frivolity. 

The band played and dancers danced, marking time until 
intermission and the announcement of the day's awards. May 



Queen Mavis Lemmons, presiding over the afternoon activities 
of the celebration, presented the much-sought-after honors to 
Gamma Phi Beta and Alpha Omega sororities, and to Kappa 
Sigma Chi and Phi Beta Phi fraternities. Engleman Hall also 
walked off with honors. 

Soon it was all over, to be put in memory moth balls and 
revived for the even more extensive plans of the next year. 
The brightness of crepe paper faded in the general weariness 
of the day and, bit by bit, the dance broke up. Campus Night 
was soon gone with the dawn of another day, but the mem- 
ories that lingered would be used to plan the next repetition of 
the leading Kent State tradition. 




51 




In preparation for baccalaureate and graduation ceremonies, Hank Ford has 
a gown fitting with the assistance of Mrs. Pearl Province. 



The family and "best girl" are on hand co congratulate graduate Bob Smiley. 
The blue and gold streamers herald the approach of the academic procession. 




RADUATION 




TT yTHEN the books were closed on the last chapter 
' ^ and classroom assignments were over, gradu- 
ating seniors turned to the final whirl of college 
dances, parties, and picnics during the activities of 
Senior Week. The years between their introduction 
to University affairs during Freshman Week had 
been more than filled with learning scholastically, 
culturally, and socially. 

The counterpart of registration was finally real- 
ized by graduation, but there was still one more line 
— the solemn procession from McGilvrey Hall to the 
University auditorium. The carefree blue and gold 
"dinks" had been replaced by the somber black of 
tasseled mortar boards. 

The Reverend Harold F. Carr presented the Com- 
mencement sermon, "Making History." It was a 
moment of achievement and a moment of parting 
for the 255 seniors who received their degrees the 
morning of June the seventh. 



Miss Jeanetce Maurer reflects the excitement that is 
natural with preparation for the finale to four years 
of college work. 



52 




'T^'HE beauty of the campus in summer makes it 
-*- difficult for even the most studious to keep his 
mind on his books. The antics of a squirrel in a 
nearby tree or a bee accidentally caught in a classroom 
are strong competition for most professors. Regard- 
less of these diversions, approximately 3,300 stu- 
dents were enrolled in the 1947 summer session. 

With the desire of the veterans to complete their 
interrupted college careers in as short a time as pos- 
sible, the summer session has afforded a means of 
setting up a continuous accelerated study program, 
as well as furnishing teachers an opportunity to com- 
plete work for their degrees. 

Outdoor classes were popular and for geography 
students the field trip to California was a special 
event. For social life last summer emphasis was on 
the musical side, with a symphony by the Cleveland 
Orchestra, a Music School concert, the appearance 
of the Ecclesia Choir, and of the noted tenor, Raoul 
Jobin. The UT presented "Dear Ruth," and talks were 
given by the Canadian poet, Wilson MacDonald, 
Senator Walter Judd, Norman Cousins, and RoUo 
Waldo Brown. 




Summer session concerts brought sucti distinguistied stars to the University stage as Raoul Jobin of tho 
Metropolitan Opera and Wilson McDonald, well-known Canadian poet. 




A Bach Festival in the auditorium brought high praise to the choir and orchestra and its 
director. Professor Carapetyan. 



SUMMER SESSIONS 



Students aren't the only ones who enjoy getting outdoors on a hot sumraer day. Often 
the suggestion comes from the prof himseif. 




^H<ii 



L*^-'* 



^m'^i^x 






*v.* • 




REGISTRATION 



T^OR the first time in five years a typical freshman 
class of high school graduates arrived on campus 
for the 1947 Fall quarter. With the continued en- 
rollment of veterans and former students, registra- 
tion figures reached the all-time high of 5,500. 

School spirit soared and the long-missed frosh haz- 
ing was revived as once again "dink!" and "scrub that 
seal!" greeted the unsuspecting newcomer. 

The rigor of registration with its long lines and 
complicated forms was an old headache for upper- 
classmen and a new confusing experience for incom- 
ing freshmen, who also had to contend with place- 
ment tests and physical examinations. 

Freshman Week was more than just the arrange- 
ment of class schedules and examinations. The in- 
troduction to college life was highlighted by an in- 
formal reception at the President's home, a social 
hour at the newly-constructed temporary Student 
Union, and an upperclass talent show. A special 
Booster Club all-frosh pep rally preceded the Mount 
Union game and the inauguration of the first football 
train received strong freshman support. 





Bcsidencq oftd Uaffit difocian i 



iohn Lilley and Alon Hainmack reverted to rtie gay nin 

their iJick duet, complete with barbershop-style haimony and 

wolking ttlckt. 

■ - ~.; :. W tl J "■ ! Jiy.VAi. 



v^ 



m 




¥S 




T IKE so many other traditions that have been revived after 
-^ the war years, the University Theatre again presented an 
annual play chosen for the Homecoming weekend. 

For this year's play the UT chose to reproduce its summer 
show, "Dear Ruth," popular on the screen and on Broadway. 
Returning with the original cast, under the direction of Pro- 
fessor Robert I. Pearce, were Barbara Laity and Beverly Rafner, 
two members of the High School Speech Institute "cherubs." 

Janet Gillespie portrayed the attractive daughter, Ruth, Nick 



Bozeka appeared as the dashing Lieut. Bill Seawright, and Jim 
Bullock was Judge Harry Wilkins. Bob MacDonald almost 
stole the show with his character portrayal of the frustrated 
fiance, Albert. 

The popular pre-war comedy team of Guisewite and Mouse, 
entertained between scenes with their version of the skit, 
"Casey at the Bat." Their return delighted both old and new 
students. 



56 




BFITrrT^B 


^^^^^KTifi'tz/iArr /ytcAaitattcn t>/ LA^nisctMtif J Iteutte fl 


H^l^^gg^^^^^ 1 



A LL the warm family spirit of the Civil War's leading 
-^ •*- woman abolitionist was captured by the University 
Theatre production of "Harriet." The play was more than the 
mere biography of a historical character. It was an interpreta- 
tion of a great woman's work and of the sincere compassion 
that brought thousands of negro slaves close to her heart. 

A veteran of the boards, Helen Mitrovka portrayed Harriet 
Beecher Stowe, who, as the author of "Uncle Tom's Cabin," 



was indirectly blamed for causing the Civil 'War. Dom DeSimio 
supported her as Harriet's doddering absent-minded husband, 
Calvin. Among the members of the exceptionally large cast 
were J. Alan Hammack, Lea Bauman, Betty Cibula, Ed Shelton, 
Ed Halas, Felice Faust, Marilyn Hatfield, and Melba DeScenna. 
The play, under the direction of Professor E. Turner 
Stump, was set by Professor Wesley Egan, new technical di- 
rector of UT. 




57 



HOMECOMING 



Homecoming Queen Dorothy Davey centers all the day's activities . . . Donald O'Conner's 
convincing sales talk is good for program sales . . . The trumpet fanfare announces the 
queen . . . Comedy team of Mouse and Guise-wite strikes one of the famous funny poses . . . 
Comedians DeSimio, Bozeka, and Bullock do a take-off on Professor Metcalf, Dean Hyatt, 
and a campus cop . . . Beta Gammas put finishing touches on their decorations . . . The 
queen is smothered vjith flowers . . . Dotty is presented . . . Alum Fran Murphy holds the 
conversation . . . Engleman Hall's winning display. 



T TQMECQMING 1947 was a real homecoming for many 
-*- -^ alums, and KSU students were well prepared for them 
with houses and dorms decorated, a winning football team, 
and an informal dance to climax the day. 

In the morning judging was held for the best sorority, fra- 
ternity, and dormitory house decorations, with the hotly con- 
tested trophies going to KMK fraternity, Alpha Xi Delta so- 
rority, and Engleman Hall. Both preceding and following the 
game, fraternities, and sororities entertained their alumnae 
with informal dinners and parties. 

Although skies were dreary, game attendance was high. En- 
thusiasm reached its peak when Wib Little and Co. went on a 
scoring spree in the closing minutes of the homecoming fracas, 
giving the Flashes a 13-0 win over the Kalamazoo eleven. 

The marching band provided a colorful background when 
Mrs. Dorothy Davey, chosen Homecoming Queen by three 
prominent Akron men, was crowned by her husband, Tom, at 
half-time of the game. Sally Yingst and Irene Kelbaugh were 
her attendants. 

George Conway provided the music for the Homecoming 
Dance that evening, as thousands of alums and students jam- 
med Wills Gym. At intermission the queen presented trophies 
to winners of the decoration contest. 



Coach Rees sends a substitute into the Homecoming day game at a crucial moment. It 
must have been a good move, since the flashes won 1 3-0 over Kalamazoo. 

Finalists in the Homecoming Queen race were lovelies Dorothy Davey, hois Musick, Delores 
Bashline, Jean Goncher, Irene Kelbaugh, Sarah Yingst. 




59 




Hot dogs tasted even better in the rustii. Pippin Lake setting at the 
end of the road for the \X'"es!e\ Foundation havndtri 



Wesley revelers forget stuffy classroonis as they enjoy a refreshing 
evening while traveling on one of the huge haywagons. 






t. 



mkM 



'Cr(' 




Empty wallets didn't stop dating for a good 
many resourceful coeds, sponsors of the Dutch 
Date Club. Campaigning are Audrie Forn- 
shell, Gloria Ulch, Mary Lou Holland, Phyllis 
Horn and Beverly Lewis. 

Ruth Horbaly and Pat Godfrey supervise two 
masked cooks as they prepare the broth for 
the Beta Gamma "Witches Cauldron" dance. 

Corky and Mandy ' ' i ntermish" during recess 
period at tlie Beta Gam dance. 




FALL HIGHLIGHTS ■ 



/ ^ AILY-COLORED leaves covered the campus as students 
^^ left their books behind to enjoy the last few days of Fall. 
The future year seemed almost as bright as the landscape, and 
extra-curricular activities came into full swing to liven eve- 
nings as well as days of work, walks, and wonderful diversions 



from classes. 

Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians made the biggest hit, fol- 
lowed by purely local attractions proportionally as well-at- 
tended as the four NBC broadcasts. Hayrides — picnics — • 
"dutch" dates — all were part of a KSU Autumn. 



Autumn leaves and frosty moonlit nights occasionally must 
be temporarily forsaken for an all-night date with books. 
Kenny must be having a test tomorrow. 



Songster Fred Waring's Pennsy lads go over their music before one of the four 
campus broadcasts . . . The ISA hayride kept suitcase students near the campus for 
the fall term outing. 




61 




The big-little sister relationship often develops into friendship which extends 
far beyond the four year limit of the college course. 



Mrs Marnti Russell pours for Ann Irons, member of the executive board of 
W omen s League, sponsors of the welcoming reception- 




-LITTLE SISTER TEA 





\ ^ 


arm 


•^tWome 


trom the Assistant Dean of Women, Miss Robbins, made 




nc^\ 


tomcr 


s feel btjth dz ease and at home in their strange surroundings. 


np 




i 




l^j 


P 


O 




I^^^^^^I^B^Bi 


U 


i 


^m \ 




III^E^^^^^^^^P^H 


U 


1 




i 


B^^^m^^ife^^fiK ' ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^v^B 



"T? XCITEMENT ran high as signals buzzed through- 
-* — ' out the freshman dormitory and young coeds in 
fresh fall afternoon dresses hurried to answer their 
bells. They were on the way to meet their Big Sisters 
for the annual Big-Little Sister Tea, sponsored by 
Women's League and the Young Women's Christian 
Association. 

Decorations of gold and rust autumn colors were 
used for the Sunday afternoon affair in the Moulton 
Hall music room. Nearly three hundred upperclass 
coeds escorted their wards through the receiving line 
to be greeted by Mrs. George A. Bowman, Dean of 
Women Ada 'V. Hyatt, and S. Martha Robbins, As- 
sistant Dean of Women. Women's League represen- 
tatives also stood in the receiving line. 

Throughout the afternoon guests were entertained 
by piano music by Maxine Evelyn. Dormitory house- 
mothers who poured were Mrs. Eleanor LaUance, Mrs. 
Harriet Russell, and Mrs. Frances Watson. Co-chair- 
men were Bonnie Avant, Ann Irons, and Anna Mary 
Acerra. 




Case discussions are a regular part of the clinic routine with Dr. Charles 
Langsam. Psychiatrist. Dr. Charles Winslow, Psychologist and director 
of the clinic, and Mary Jane Rahder, Clinical Psychologist. 

Graduate students, such as Wilbur Thomas. 
Hj serve as clinical assistants and also find time 

^* to help undergrads with their questions 

The practical experience of trying out one 
of the tests is gained by Ruth Davidson, 
undergraduate clinical assistant, aided by 
graduate assistant Lois Jones. 




THE CLINICS 



TT7HILE most students spent their in-between 
^ ^ class hours relaxing at the Hub or perching on 
the benches of Prentice Gate, a few occupied these 
spare moments in special testing, often even more 
important than regular classroom studies. 

These students were being aided by the two largest 
Universities clinics — in speech and hearing therapy 
and in psychology. 

Under direction of Professor John Montgomery, 
the speech division emphasized correction of stut- 
tering, lisping, and other impediments. Hard-of-hear- 
ing students were given special instruction in lip- 
reading. 

Similar progress toward complete normalcy was 
made in the psychology clinic, under supervision of 
Dr. Raleigh Drake. A major branch of the organiza- 
tion concerned testing students to find their basic 
abilities and talents. 

Both clinics also aided area residents, at the same 
time giving experience to student clinicians. 



iinistenng speech and hearing 
lity. 

and Hearing Clinic, Professor Montgomery demonstrates 



PIGSKIN PROM 




CENSATIONAL upset of the powerful John Carrol 



^ 



eleven made the KSU grid team the toast of the 



campus, and the varsity heroes were feted properly 
at the annual Pigskin Prom, sponsored by the Booster 
Club November 7. 

Although members of the squad were not attired 
in jerseys and padding, they were right at home in 
Wills Gym, which was laid out as a token football 
held. Other decorations featured two large cardboard 



footballs, banners representing Kent's eight football 
opponents, and balloon nests which were released at 
intermission. 

Members of the varsity team were guests of honor 
at the affair, and served as a mass escort at presenta- 
tion of Doris Heupel, prom queen, during intermis- 
sion ceremonies. 

Music for the dance was furnished by the Solitud- 
ers, campus dance band. 



The queen shares he 
and sorority sisters. 



Mary end Chet were typicof of the increased 
number of husband and wife combinofions 
at University affairs. 



i the decorations 





65 



SADIE HAWKINS DANCE 



TF Leap Year didn't offer enough opportunities to 
-'-solve the dating problem of worried females, the 
more enterprising turned to the precedent created by 
Al Capp's famous cartoon character, Sadie Hawkins, 
and on a day set aside in her name, the girls took 
over the "datin' sitchiashun." 

The gals "catched" their men and dragged their 
prizes to the annual Sadie Hawkin's dance held in 
Wills Gym. It was a strictly Dogpatch formal — jeans, 
torn shirts and short skirts and all the moonshine 



bottle trimmings. 

Prize winning characters, selected by guest judges, 
Dorothy Hawkins, Mrs. Pearl Tucker, and Roy Wil- 
hekn were Debbie Blumer as Daisy Mae, Paul Timko 
as Lil' Abner, Ginny Straight as Mammy Yokum, 
Dick Kline as Hairless Joe, Daisy Taylor as Sadie 
Hawkins, and Marilyn Kirkland as Moonbeam 
McSwine. 

The Solituders, a university dance band, furnished 
the rootin', tootin' moosic. 





TJILGRIMS of yesteryear might well have been 
-*- shocked at the undignified pleasure of a dance, 
but members of the Newman Club who attended the 
semi-formal Pilgrim Prom were not influenced by the 
old austere viewpoint. 

Open to all Catholics and their dates, the club's 
biggest affair was held in the Aurora Country Club 
ballroom. An effective Thanksgiving Day atmos- 
phere was produced by the black and white pilgrim 



silhouettes at each side of the bandstand. Black and 
white balloons and sprays of colored leaves hung 
from the ceiling, to complete the early American 
setting. 

The evening's music was provided by Bob Smith 
and his quintet, from Akron. Anne Domiter and 
Margaret Buher were social chairmen, in charge of 
preparations for the Newman Club's effective Autumn 
baU. 



:j 



PILGRIM PROM 



SEMI-FORMAL SPONSORED BY THE NEWMAN CLUB 



\im 




/ing one of the largest audiences in University records, the Christmas oratorio brought visitors from ajl. f^rJs-t?{^4'?^Phf? '<''^^* 



THE MESSIAH 



The official lighting of the tree in the atrium and a Blue Key pledge dinner after the 
Messiah added to the holiday spirit of the day's program. 




i^ktlil 



tiiunui 



L tuL'tt^' 



A RECORD-BREAKING audience of 3,700 music- 
-^ ■*- lovers filled Wills Gym for the tenth annual pre- 
sentation of Handel's world-famous Christmas ora- 
torio, "The Messiah." 

Seldom-heard choruses and arias were effective ad- 
ditions to the campus presentation, given in the tra- 
ditional manner built up through more than 150 
years of popularity. Director of the mammoth pro- 
duction was Caro M. Carapetyan, who molded the 250 
\'oices of three choirs into the largest choral group 
ever formed at Kent State. 

Singers of the A Cappella Choir, the University 
Chorus, and the off-campus Kent Choral Society 
were blended, with musicians from the KSU or- 
chestra giving added body to the great choruses. 
Soloists included Lillian Wilkinson, soprano. Con- 
tralto Sonia Essin, Myron Taylor, tenor, and Bari- 
tone Gordon Gaines. 



68 







HOME AWAY FROM HOME 



(l^nalt'tiian ^^:-^all 

T TOME of many upperclass leaders in campus af- 
-*- -^ fairs is Engleman Hall, newest of the three 
dormitories and residence of nearly 300 junior and 
senior coeds. 

Doris Wilkes directed Engleman activities until 
she graduated in March, leaving the dorm presi- 
dency to Marion Lemponen. Other officers were 
Miriam Pugh, secretary; Lois Webb, treasurer; Ann 
Irons, social chairman; and Dorothy Shay, fire chief. 
Mrs, Frances Watson was housemother. 

Eerie ghost stories recited by flickering candlelight 
gave atmosphere to the dormitory Halloween party, 
made realistic by the addition of corn stalks to the 
modern lounge furnishings. The reception room 
underwent another transformation at Christmas time, 
when a ceiling-high Christmas tree provided atmos- 
phere for the musical program, highlighted by ac- 
cordion carols. 



Engleman Officers: Luis Webb, treasurer: Miriam Pugh. secretary: 
vice-president; Duns \\ ilkt-s, president; Doroiliy Shay, fire chief; Ann It 



Marion Lenipvincn, 




69 




BASE OF OPERATIONS 



LowRY Officers — First Row: Jean Kudrna, secretary; Shirley Edwards, vice-president; 

Peggy Buher. president; Betty Mann, treasurer; Dorothy Patts, athletic manager. 
Second Row: jane King, social chairnaan; Jeanne Wolfe, publicity chairman; Jerry Keller, 

fire warden. 




X.rr,, JIJI 



7 -- 



'17' EEN competition even among close friends 
-■-^ marked the year's activities among sophomore 
women residing in Lowry Hall. 

Monthly contests prompted coeds to decorate their 
rooms, with rivalry most intense during the Christmas 
season, when Professors Ada Hyatt, S. Martha Rob- 
bins, and Isabel Hazen judged rooms and suites to 
find the prettiest. An open house climaxed the deco- 
rating activities. 

Margaret Buher was Lowry president, assisted by 
Shirley Edwards, vice-president; Jean Kudrna, sec- 
retary; Betty Mann, treasurer; Dorothy Potts was 
athletic manager, Jane King social chairman, Jeanne 
Wolfe publicity chairman, and Jerry Keller fire 
warden. 

Most home-like dorm, Lowry Hall is the interlude 
between frosh and busy upperclass houses. Mrs. E. M. 
Russell is housemother. 



70 




VARIETY UNLIMITED 



IL^Jicn JiAl 



MOULTON Officers — First Row: Gloria Donnelly, treasurer; Barbara Lightfoot, social 
chairman; Suzanne Burnes, president; Mrs. Lallance; Elizabeth Haggerry, vice-president; 
Elizabeth Robinson, athletic director. 

Second Row: Nancianne Martin, fire chief; Nancy Pinkertun sr^icr.iM 



TNEXPERIENCE was no detriment to the gals of 
-^ Moulton Hall, who managed to carry on a full 
program of social activities equal to that of either of 
their upperclass superiors. 

Susanne Burns headed the 200-odd Moultonites, 
with Joan Haggerty vice-president, Nancy Pinkerton, 
secretary, and Gloria Donnelly treasurer. Nancianne 
Martin was fire chief, Barbara Lightfoot social chair- 
man and Elizabeth Robinson headed the Moulton Hall 
athletic activities. 

A gift exchange was the high point of the frosh 
dorm Christmas party, held in the Music Room, also 
scene of the group's house meetings. Because of their 
proximity to many campus dances, held in the ball 
room, Moulton coeds were volunteer checkers and 
hostesses at many special affairs. Mrs. Eleanore Lal- 
lance remained at the freshman dorm as housemother 
for the third year. 




71 



ALL GREEK FORMAL 




/^NE night every year, the traditional competition 
^^-^ among Greek organizations is temporarily put 
aside to make way for display of all the social graces 
and latest in evening wear at a special formal dance. 
The occasion for this exhibition of ceremony was 
the annual All-Greek formal, sponsored by Alpha 
Omega sorority to honor their new pledges. This year 
eighteen fledglings were given the official welcome at 
their "coming out party," held in the East Market 
Gardens ballroom in Akron at the end of the Autumn 
quarter. 




72 



The crowd waits for the appearance of the 
AO pledge set and the highlight of the even- 
jng's social event. 



Jim Lull led the Gammas as they carried their 
Fall songfest training into the Winter quarters. 



Professor Nicholson. Professor Cochran, and 
Mrs. McNaughcon were among the last to 
leave. 



Helping him to "put his best foot forward," 
Scortie Ryder sees to it that Frank Leonard's 
lie is straight. 




■n RIGHT-COLORED banners of each Greek or- 
-^ ganization on campus decorated the walls of the 
spacious ballroom for the All-Greek formal, pro- 
viding an appropriate background for guests who 
danced to the music of Ross Halamay's orchestra. 

Mabel Davey, Alpha Omega social chairman, had 
complete charge of the ball, the high spot on fraternity 
and sorority social calendars. 

Final touch of Greek atmosphere was added by the 
"Song Intermission," when each group serenaded 
those in the dance audience with its fraternity sons?. 







,'r 



'^ 



73 




''1^\'-^' 







TOP HOP 



I [ LM^ l\cnt <:^tate. 



Mabel Davey relaxes informally amid views of the Top Hop, where she was crowned Miss 
Kent State . . . Alabel was attended by Bonnie Avant and Eleanor Meek as she approached 
the throne . , , Miss Kent State smiles happily while holding flowers fro^n her sorority, 
Alpha Omega, and the 1948 trophy . . . Roy Newsome emceed the dance . . . Cold weather 
didn't keep many from the all-V niversity formal . . . Jack Wendelken escorted the lucky 
coed to the Top Hop, and was first to congratulate her . . , Classmates and old friends 
join in greeting the evening's heroine, and her tzco attendants . . . Students, alumni and 
faculty enjoyed the evening of dancing , . . George Taimuty helps Betty Pulkerson with 
her waist corsage . . . Eleanor, Mabel, and Bonnie smile happily as they pose before the 
throne. 



T TIGH costs of living brought even mighty tra- 
-*- -*- dition to its knees when the strict formahty of 
the annual Top Hop gave way to informal dress. 
Uniforms were out of style and veterans' budgets did 
not include tuxedos or tails. 

What was lost in tradition, however, was made up 
in fanfare in the presentation of Mabel Davey, ac- 
claimed Miss Kent State by a student election. At 
intermission the queen, wearing a royal red velvet 
robe trimmed in ermine, was escorted to her throne 
by heads of all Greek organizations and the ISA. At- 
tendants Bonnie Jean Avant and Eleanor Meek walk- 
ed beside Miss Davey during the royal procession. 

"Name" band selected for this year's Top Hop was 
the versatile Bobby Sherwood orchestra, well known 
for both jazz and danceable music. 

A new tradition was started when the queen was 
presented with the first Miss Kent State trophy, a 
silver cup. Roy Newsome made the presentation. The 
large loving cup wiU be a rotating trophy with the 
queen's name engraved on it. Miss Davey and future 
queens will keep miniature replicas of the main award. 




// must be nice to be a photographer when queens throu 
Sherwood gives out with a mellow trumpet solo. 



kisses such as the. 



Bobby 




MY SISTER EILEEN 

<=:yteiliniuii nyxeicntaiton o-r L-Liuvczntii J-lieatte 



Paul Na^rallah didn't seem to convince Jane Gates that his 
was a deep and abiding love. It seemed more like a very 
familiar line. 



A LL the adventurous spirit of a young writer and her stage- 
■'- ■*• struck blonde sister was transferred to the auditorium 
stage for "My Sister Eileen," perfectly chosen Freshman Class 
Play. Presented late in the Fall quarter, the three-act drama 
starred Jane King and Jane Gates in the leading roles. Effec- 
tively reproduced was the down-to-earth hilarity of the original 
book and comedy hit. 

Actors making their first appearance on the college stage 
included Ernest Mauer, Edward Shelton, Paul Nasrallah, among 
others, while actresses Becky Caldwell and Lea Bauman also 
were new. 

Not a full-fledged member of the frosh class but also making 
his first UT appearance in "Eileen" was Professor Wes Egan, 
technical director who designed and fully supervised building 
of the basement-apartment sets. 

Professor G. Harry Wright directed the comedy, leading the 
UT season ofT to a start sure to tickle the funny-bone of an 
audience pleased to see new theatre talent. 




The basemenr aparfment proved io be Oi private os a bonk m the 
middle of Times Square . . . From the looks of Ihings Ernie Mauer 
was obout fo cry over spilled wine . . . Eileen and her sister were never 
quite sure who might walk in, and Jane King, as Ruth, didn't always 
approve of the company. 




ANTIGONE 

laiiitazif lUteientutic^n or L viiivetMlit J-'ieatte 



The fjcing of inescapable reality brings mental agitation to 
Jim Bullock as Creon when the plot of life is revealed by 
Wilbur Proctor as the chorus. 



/^^ REEK classic methods of plot structure and planar action 
^^ were set to modern language and dress for "Antigone," 
the most unusual serious drama to open on the University 
Theatre stage in several years. Director was Muriel Lewis, 
newest member of the School of Speech faculty. 

Graduate student Dorothy Ayre held the audience's atten- 
tion with her interpretation of the title role — that of a young 
girl trying to do justice to her dead brother and her tyrant- 
uncle. 

Veteran actor Jim Bullock was the uncle, dressed in modern 
formal clothes which contrasted with the vivid red of Anti- 
gone's gown. In the supporting cast were Felice Faust, David 
Roberts, Richard Evans, Betty Hull, Frank Yukman, Robert 
Mitchell, James lacovazzo, and Robert Wallace. 

Carrying out the Greek form to the last detail, Wilbur 
Proctor had the narrator's part, as he informed the audience 
of the stage action in the traditional manner. 





rha climax in a duel of wordt brings Creon to the point of physical 
violence in an effort to turn Antigone, Ooty Ayre, to his will . . , The 
moral of the story was onwotmd olong with the plot as the "chorus" 
directed the line of reasoning . . . The theme of the fomous Hamlet 
soliloquy was also the problem of debate between Antigone and 
her sister, Felice Faust. 





UT FORMAL 



T TNIQUE posters and pictures of past Universit)' 
^^ Theater productions amid the effective glow of 
red spotlights gave a true theatrical atmosphere to 
the annual UT semi-formal, held in the Moulton Hall 
music room the last of January. 

Count Williams and his orchestra, popular Cleve- 
land dance band, furnished music. 

At intermission, new members of Alpha Psi Omega 
national dramatics honorary, were presented by Jim 
Bullock, UT social chairman. 

Chaperones for the dance included Speech School 
staff members E. Turner Stump, G. Harry Wright, 
James N. Holm, and John R. Montgomery and their 



Guests of the evening included professors Stump and 
Wright, Mrs. Stump, Mrs. Wright, and professor and 
Mrs. Holm . . . Could that be the Rhumba step that 
Felice Faust is showing to Dolores Clark, Jim Bullock, 
and date, Nick Bozeka? . . . Tired from the dance, 
many of the theatre biggies found refuge in the Moulton 
lounges . . . On or off the stage Dom DeSimio can 
command his audience, here made up of Terry Pugliese, 
Roberta Harper, Jerry Hendee, Helen Mitrovka, and 
Jim lacovazzo. 



Ed Halas and Cleveland visitor enjoyed a little kibicizing as they 
moved io for a closeup of the quintet. 



R. O. T. C. 



TT 7ITH cadence "loud and clear," the ROTC 
^ ' marched onto the campus last Fall. Veterans 
who had been trying to forget what a uniform looked 
like found themselves the objectives of a brisk re- 
cruiting drive. 

And contrary to previous emphatic statements, 
many of them soon were listed as part of the Kent 
State Reserve Officer Training Corps. 

Lt. Col. Thomas Wall, head of the military science 
department, has seen his "command" develop from the 
embryonic stage into what next fall will be the sixth 
largest unit among forty colleges and universities. 

With authority granted by the Second Army to 
enroll an additional one hundred students, it will 
consist of 165 cadets, all Juniors and Seniors and a 
basic section of non-veterans with no limit as to 
number. 



Firsc full dress meeting found the ranks a little ragged, 
but some fancy drill smoothed them out . . . Dr. Bowman 
and Colonel Wall inspect the new uniforms . . . The 
manual of arms was nothing new to many of the vets 
. . . And to think, some of these men said they'd never 
get back into a uniform! 



Almost forgotten for a while, the dress uniform of the new campus 
unit was just as "sharp" as it had been during the war years. 





NO TIME FOR CLASSES 



<=^lt <~>tuAcnt yl- LuiuaL i atieiit <~>k 



'tew 




"T^ROPPING the usual thin plot outlines, Producer 
-*-^ Lenny Taylor completely rejuvenated the annual aU- 
student musical "No Time For Classes" into a streamlined 
variety show exhibiting the best in song and theatre talent 
from the student body. 

Carrying the main load of comedy lines were Dom De- 
Simio, Jim Sharpe, Bob MacDonald, and Irving "Babe" 
Hahn. Introduction of the new music by Taylor, Bill Wil- 
liams, and others, was left to Pete Ulrich and Irene Brod- 
beck, while Felice Faust and her partner Frank Carioti 
worked out original dance routines. 

Special additions to the format were the twelve Taylor 
Girls who starred in the "Feminalities" skit. 



1948 Taylor Maids — HiUegarde Boehm, Irene Brodbeck, Barbara Brower, 
Jeanne Fulueber, Lois Heller. Helen Hallock, Helen Kalb, Irene Kelbaugh, 
Sally Koch, Jessica Lou Perry, Doris Peterson, and Carol Weltner. 



Stage crew for NTFC included Terry Pugl 
Jerry Heodee, ond Ronny Cohen. 

Surrounded by Ihc Tovlor Moids, Producer Lenny Taylor, Musical Director Bill Williams and Direcio 
Bullock, go over o score and iron out some of the kinks in the production. 




80 



ANNUAL MASQUERADE SPONSORED BY ART CLUB 



MASQUE BALL 




UNIVERSITY students and their guests stepped from 
the prosaic world of reality into the depths of under- 
sea fantasy for a full evening early in February. The event 
occurred at the annual Art Club-sponsored Masque Ball. 

After walking into the gaping mouth of a fish and wind- 
ing through a maze of crepe paper seaweed, dancers came 
upon the dance floor through the torn side of a sunken 
ship. Schools of painted fish hung from the ceiling and a 
crepe paper net filled with colored balloon bubbles further 
carried out the Davey Jones Locker theme. 

Ross Halamay and his orchestra provided the evening's 



music from a bandstand set against a treasure chest back- 
drop, completing the under-sea picture. 

King Neptune was at the Masque Ball, and earthly 
creatures and deep-sea life mingled together as octopuses 
and mermaids danced by Alpine mountaineers and sheiks 
with their harem girls. 

Twin alligator costumes won first prize in dress for 
Penny Carroll and William Pistner, Art Club members. 
Non-members winning top awards were Richard Kotis and 
Ethel Szojak, with Sheldon Pressler and Alice Kasabach in 
second place. Two Akron artists judged the costumes. 




Originality was the ki 
costumes being of the i 
bedsheets for Ihe.r wc 


enled 
srkmg 


at ths yea 
type OS des 


r s event 
tgners tun 


wtl- 
ned 


1 an obviojily small number of 
to newspoper, burlop, ond even 


Kent Stote for c 
of the Mexican. 


me night ploy 
Arab. Indian. 


sd host to a 
and a doze 


cosmopoli 
;n other n 


tan crowd OS. 
ations for thei 


artists look to the dreu 
r mosquerode 





once to the dance 
mken ship . . , The 
rize among Art Club ...^...^^-.^ . .. .■ 
in, Ethel Siojok and Dick KotIs took 



3s goined through the torn hull of o 

tame alligators carried home first 

. . No dumb-bells in the long 

for originality. 





Taking part in the "Spring Fashion Carnival" sponsored by the home eco- 
nomics students were Professor Haley. Martha Bissler, Melba DeScenna, 
Felice Faust, Delores Hunt, Mrs. Estella Keane, moderator, Barbara Berg, 
Margaret Maxton, Phyllis Province, Marilyn Taylor, and Professor Kramer. 



Even on the beach or sun porch fashion dictates called 
for ankle lengths as shown by the sun dress modeled 
by Margaret Maxton. 



Open warfare on the new look flared to a new high 
as the male protest took the form of out and out 
action. 



Barbara Berg wears one of the hit fashions of the 
show to demonstrate that the longer length could be 
very attractive. 



THE NEW LOOK 



/^^ OLD STARS, yardsticks, caps and knickers — 



O^ 



symbolic of the KSU male's answer to the hem- 



line question only paved the way to a summary 
Spring style show for University women on how 
to antagonize the men even more with the very 
latest fashions. 

Moaning and groaning from the outset of the Fall 
term, the K-Vets used a yardstick as a measure of a 
girl's sense of fashion. 

The next attack on long skirts Stater men took to 
caps and knickers, swearing to only give them up 
when Stater girls antiquated the new look. The "Fancy 
Dan" attire lasted three days. 

Padded hips, bustles, and ballerina skirts — integral 
factors in the campus Gibson girls' wardrobes — had 
faded the new look into the old look. 



83 




CHESTNUT BURR FORMAL 



NOVEL "Man-About-Town" decorations added to the 
transformation of Wills Gym as the floor was given over 
to the strict formality of the Chestnut Burr Ball, the year's 
only all-University, all-formal dance. 

Decorations for the formal February 28 featured white-tied 
gentlemen leaning against lighted lamp posts. The shirt fronts 
of glittering material matched an oversized shirt front mount- 
ed over the bandstand. Decorations, theme, and poster de- 
signs were under the supervision of Harlan McGrail, art editor 
of the yearbook. 

Perry Como, one of the ranking radio "crooners," was named 
to select the queen who reigned over the University dance. His 
decision, one of the year's most closely-kept secrets, was re- 
vealed by Terry Pugliese at dance intermission. Chairman of 
the dance. Miss Pugliese introduced Charlene Arnold, fresh- 
man in the liberal arts college and a member of Alpha Omega 
sorority. 

Miss Arnold was awarded a dozen roses by the Burr staffs, 
presented by Editor Frank Carioti, Jr. Bouquets then went to 
the two runners-up, Marilyn Taylor and Josephine Douglass, 
both of Beta Gamma sorority. 

George Conway and his orchestra played for the dance 
which attracted more than 250 couples. Included among the 
celebraters were more than one former Burr editor and other 
staff members of previous yearbooks — all joining the dancers 
at the Chestnut Burr formal. 



Chestnut Burr queen Charlene Arnold is surrounded by celebrations in her honor . . . 
Larry Vitsky congratulates the queen . . . Business Manager Bob Magee and his wife Virginia 
admire Charlene's bouquet, . . . Betty Winter and off-campus friend chat in front of the main 
bandstand . . . Nurse Jean Stage and hubby John ftnd an eavesdropper . . . Burr Editor Frank 
Carioti and Terry Pugliese, dance chairman, present the queen . . . A lamp-post dandy gets 
prettied up . . . Terry has the Queen say a few words . . . Glo Sherrets and '47 Burr editor 
Ah'in Geitgey enjoyed the dance. 

Charlene Arnold, queen of the evenings activity, sits betiveen her attendants, Marilyn Taylor 
and Jo Douglass . . . Chief Photographer Dick Arnold, Art Editor Harlan McGrail, and 
assistant Editor Marion Cole go over plans for the big affair . . . High point of the Winter 
social season, the Burr Formal carried a veil of secrecy concerning the queen to be chosen 
by Terry Como. 





85 



ACCENT ON YOUTH 

yyiuTcli .UteMittaticn cf LLnivet^uit J^keatte 



^LL the confusion of a play within a play and 
actors portraying actors comprised the plot of 




All the offecla 




Bert Emanuel, George Yates, tooi'masler of the banquet, ond Julius Greenfield, choir- The technical part of color pholcarophy icr reprocjction rpc^ivf, mor-- empnas.s each 

man of round-tobte discussions, were typical of small discussion groups. year at the Short Course. This year Akron models were used. 



PHOTOGRAPHY SHORT COURSE 



The executive committee for the 1948 Short Course meet to "iron 
out the kitilcs." Professor William Taylor holds the attention of the 
group, while Professor James Fosdici<. Short Course Executive Secre- 
tary, looks on seated at the left of the group. 



T70R the first time since its inception ten years ago, 
•^ the 1948 Short Course in News Photography 
concerned itself only with professional cameramen 
and their problems. Despite the desired cut in en- 
rollment, bringing the number to a workable 300, 
papers from thirty states and Canada sent their men 
to the conference. 

Professor James A. Fosdick was executive secre- 
tary for the seventh annual event, with Joseph Costa 
of New York as director. Other top photographer- 
lecturers included George Yates, Ralph Wareham, 
Frank Scherschel, and William Eckenberg. 




87 




Executive committee of the Radio Workshop included (circle left to right): Clem Scerback, president; Jim Bullock, vice-president; Wanda 
Lashley, secretary; Professor Walton Clarke, advisor; Wally Krivoy, treasurer; Wright Everett, publicity manager; and Kenny Goldstein, 
script director. 



T N one corner of Kent Hall members of the Kent 
-'- State Radio Workshop — otherwise known as 
KSRW — write, cast, direct, and produce their own 
scripts in a series of modern, soundproof, fully- 
equipped studios. 

Main weekly goal of the workshop staff is pro- 
duction of a top-notch fifteen-minute broadcast over 
WAKR, Akron. Basically a series of dramatic scripts, 



entire broadcasts are occasionally donated to presen- 
tation of excerpts from current UT plays, to speeches 
by students and professors, and to special concerts by 
the a cappella choir. 

Clem Scerback headed RW most of the year, with 
Jim Bullock vice-president, Wanda Lashley secretary, 
Wallace Krivoy treasurer, and Kenny Goldstein, Julia 
Ross, Tom Cacioppo, and Sandy Wolfe. 



Felice Faust and Nick Bozeka chose background music that can make or break a show . . . Marge Ritter handles what will eventually be 
a very real window slam on the air . . . Working from the control room were Fred Baker and John Lapidakis . . . Acmal rehearsal 
periods helped break Debbie Blumer and other RW members of any mike shyness . . . There is always at least one good idea to come 
out of these script writing epixodes. 




ON THE AIR FOR 



RADIO WORKSHOP 



ENT STATE UNIVERSITY 




Coordination is never more necessary than in radio production 
delivery of a broadcast. 



^■here dozens of variable must always be controlled in order to insure the professional caliber 



' I 'HE red second hand of the electric clock swings 
■*- around exactly to the hour; a finger from the con- 
trol room shoots toward the glass panel as it points 
toward an actor before the mike; and with the first 
note of the mood music the regular Saturday broad- 
cast of Radio Workshop goes on the air through its 
Akron outlet. 

For fifteen minutes actors move silently over the 
carpeted floor, dropping their script pages noiselessly 
as they are completed. In the control room one record 
after another is put in place, while a separate record- 
ing machine picks up every word and note for later 
smdy. And from behind a false door the sound ef- 
fects director produces the final touches of reality. 
KSRW on the air! 






■P 'f 



^9 




NEW LOOK FOR THE CAMPUS 




'T~'HE campus erupted, and out of the cavity created 
-*- by bulldozers, shovels, and working crews appear- 
ed the yellow brick shoots of the future men's dorm, 
student health center, and student union building. 
These were the first major constructions at KSU 
since million-doUar McGilvrey Hall was completed 
in 1940. 

Birth of the health center and the activity next to 
the "Hub," being closest to the main campus, were 
given due consideration by sidewalk engineers. While 
visible progress was being made, spirited drives 
simultaneously were in progress for the proposed 
Memorial Stadium. 




^ht Mardi Gros of KSU, Penny Carnival offered dozens of o e;;on! 
w jvi to advance the Stadium Drive. Boolhi ranged from freak showi 
(0 skill testers ond horror houses. 





rEAR'S EN 



"XTTHILE forsychia bushes bloomed along the 
' ' library' paths and a new-green glow covered 
the campus hillside, Spring quarter activities rose to 
.1 climax \vith the return of the Don Cossacks, the ap- 
pe.irance of local talent on the Men's Glee Club and 
Faculty Night programs. 

Campus couples welcomed evening programs, and 
warm weather found many taking advantage of the 
lone lanes back to the dorm. -■ 



inging group on campus, the University heorlily welcomed th 
Club in the March assembly program, directed by Professo 



Shirley Dague found good use ot the Penny Carnls 
for the principles of solesmanship she might have 

Sloppy Spring weolher brought out the knee boots. 
Irene Tyron needed a helping hand with hers at the 
Hub. 




Th 



L 



%mim 



Frank Carioti, Jr. 




atantinat rutd^ nom^eiiAe 



I 



anX ic 



at 111111, 



r 



A prominent eighteenth century poet and dramatist believed education 
began and ended with this strange combination of qualities. So it may have 
been in his day, but certainly by standards of twentieth century education 
"grammar and nonsense and learning" are but the beginning. 

Grammar to a Kent State University senior began with a long-forgotten 
course in Freshman composition. It included such a variety of talent-builders 
as term paper writing — the bane of collegiate existence — and sentence dia- 
gramming. Nonsense, too, has had its place in the University. Some from the 
stage, as NTFC and Pork Barrel; some from the Hub, dorms, and fraternity 
houses. 

Together grammar and nonsense have produced a modern learning which 
blends formal and informal academic and social training into a college 
graduate. 



Student Body 



93 




Dr. Raymond M. Clark 

Director of Graduate histruction 




i^aie 



I 




'T~*HIRTEEN years have not proved unlucky for the 
-^ youngest division in the Kent State family — the 
Graduate School. 

Once a rarity on campus, graduate students now 
total more than one hundred. Bachelor's degrees 
held by these persons are from thirty-two colleges, 
with Kent State holding the majority as fifty-two 
students have chosen to continue their work at their 
undergraduate Alma Mater. 

Ohio State University has contributed five students 
to the KSU graduate division, for the largest repre- 
sentation from another school. 

To earn a master's degree, aspirants must com- 
plete forty hours of classroom work in addition to a 
five-hour thesis. Graduate courses have been ofi^ered 
since May, 1935, when legislation converted Kent 
State from a college to a full-fledge university. 

Dr. Raymond Clark, Director of Graduate Instruc- 
tion, has been a familiar figure on campus since he 
joined the faculty in 1926. Formerly head of the 
psychology department, he served as Acting Presi- 
dent in 1943-44. 



Alice A. Belanger 

KENT. OHIO 

US n(ii\crsity of Minnesota 



Virginia M. Bica 
alliance, ohio 

BS in ED Kent Staii 



Augustine A. Cosentino 

YOUNGSTOWN. OHIO 

BS in ED Kent State University 



Jean D. Custis 

HARTVILLE, OHIO 

BS in ED Wilmington College 




94 



Joseph W. Devine 
akron, ohio 

BS in ED Akron University 

James J. Edwards 

LORAIN, OHIO 

BS Kent State University 

Jacob L. Egger 
byesville, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 



Michael Feduniak 
akron, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 

Joseph E. Foust 
ravenna, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 

Vivian E. Gage 

ROCKY river, OHIO 

BS in ED Kent State University 



Mary M. Adam 
canton, ohio 

BS Ohio University 

Dorothy E. Ayre 
caro. michigan 

BA Central Michigan 

Charles M. Bailey 

NEWTON falls, OHIO 

BS in ED 

Bowling Green State Univetsity 

Edward P. Barkley 

CANTON, OHIO 
BA Miami University 

Margaret D. Bast 
canton, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 




Roger B. Bishop 

north canton. ohio 

AB Heidelberg College 

Opal W. Boffo 
kent, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 

F. W. Brigeman 

AKRON. OHIO 

BS in ED Kent State University 

William E. Brobst 
warren, ohio 

BS Kent State University 



'4 






Mary M, Burke 

MASSILLON, OHIO 

BS in ED Kent State Universiry 

Mildred K. Campbell 
massillon, ohio 

BS Drexel Institute 

Edward P. Cory 

AKRON, OHIO 

AB; BS in ED 

Ohio State L^niversity 

Chrisavi Couris 
canton, ohio 

BS Kent State University 




Reverend Milo J. Dalton 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 
BA John Carroll Lfniversity 

Nellie G. Dehnbostel 
warren, ohio 

BA; BS in ED; MA 
Kent State University 
BMM Music 
Dana Musical Institute 

Werner K. Dickson 
akron, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 

Arleen L. Dodez 
navarre, ohio 

BA College of Wooster 



Clifford T. Hancock 
east liverpool, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 



Arthur B. Hurd 
ravenna, ohio 

BS in ro Kfnt State University 



FRANK W. JeFFERY 
MEDINA, OHIO 
liMiiin Ohio Northern 



Marian H. Jessel 
cleveland, ohio 

BS Kent State Lrniversuy 




95 




Donna J. Kuhlman 

NEW MIDDLETOW \' OHIO 
AB Voungstonn ( .>lkic 



Hsiao Fang Li 
chicago. illinois 

BS National Tsing Hua University 



Ellis T. Mills. Sr, 

cuyahoga falls. ohio 

BS in ED Kent State Univcrs 



Esther Purdv 

t~["i-AHOGA FALLS. OHIO 
R^ Kent State University- 




96 



E. Laird Isenogle 

AKHON, OHIO 

BS Kent State University 

Paul C. Janaske 

danville. pennsylvania 

BS Dickinson College 

E. GAIL Jeffrey 

TORONTO. OHIO 

BS in ED Kent State University 

Lois O. Jones 
cleveland. ohio 

AB Fenn College 

Ralph A. Keefer 

CANTON. OHIO 

BS Mt. Union College 

Paul C. Kitchin, Jr. 
windham, ohio 

AB Ohio State University 

Martha J. Lauderbaugh 

KENT. OHIO 

AB Kent State University 



Wade Mori 

BARBERTON, OHIO 
BS Penn State 

Edward J. Musch 

CUYAHOGA FALLS. OHIO 
BS University of Michigan 

Clarance H. Ortt 

NEWCOMERSTOWN, OHIO 
BS in ED Kent State Univetsity 

Orson E. Ott 

garrettsville, ohio 

BA; BS in ED 

Kent State University 

Neville S. Powell 
kent, ohio 

BS University of Houston 

Clarence L. Richey 
canton, ohio 

BS, MA Ohio State University 

Roy L. Robenstine 
mogadore. ohio 

BS Kent State University 




Howard W. Schhrm.^n 
kent, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 



Paul R. Shively 
ravenna, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 



Merle E. Leggett 
medina, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 

Harold E. Lionetti 
akron, ohio 

BA University of Akron 

Mildred E. McClellan 
canton, ohio 

BA College of Wooster 

Bertha W. Martin 
cortland, ohio 

BE University of Miami 

Otis G. Maxwell, Jr. 

CUYAHOGA falls, OHIO 
BS Kent State University 

Mercedes L, Miller 
windham, ohio 

AB Kent State University 



Theron W. Schmidt 
canton, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 

Anna Mary Seruch 
akron, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 

Don T. Shanower 
canton, ohio 

AB Kent State University 

Everet G. Sheets 
van wert, ohio 

BS in ED Ohio State University 

Marjorie Jane Shive 
canton, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 

Mary A. Short 

ELYRIA, OHIO 

BS in ED Kent State University 



Millard B. Souers 
canton, ohio 

BA Denison University 

Eva May Sparrowgrove 
canton, ohio 

BS in ED Kent State University 

John L. Starrett 
kent, ohio 

AB Heidelberg College 

Gerald M. Stevenson 
kent, ohio 

BA Kent State University 

Lloyd M. Swan 
canton, ohio 

BS Mt. Union 

MA Ohio State University 

Charles R. Thomas 
warren. ohio 

BA; BS in ED 

Kent State University 



Clyde V. Vanaman 

CANTON, OHIO 

BS Mt. Union College 

Marion E. Walker 

TWINSBURG, OmO 
BS Ohio University 

JOHN W. WARDELL 

EAST CLEVELAND, OHIO 
BS in ED Kent State University 

Roger H. Watkins 
cuyahoga falls. ohio 

BS Kent State University 

George G. Weisz 
seville, ohio 

BFA Miami University 

Margaret Ann Williams 
sharon, pennsylvania 

BA Allegheny College 



Wilbur C. Thomas 
oberlin, ohio 

BA Kent State University 



William E. Welker 
uniontown, ohio 

BS in ED 

Bowling Green State University 



Galen H. Young 
ravenna, ohio 

BA Manchester College 



Mary E. Zimmerman 
akron, ohio 

BS Kent State University 




97 




4 8 






TT THEN a handful of freshmen filed into the auditorium 
* " for their first orientation instructions in the Fall of 
1944, the entire class scarcely made an impression in the 
sprawling center section downstairs. 

By Commencement time in June, 1948, this same class, 
swollen by veterans, was large enough to overflow the main 
division of the auditorium. 

Class activities for nearly five hundred seniors were guided 
by elected officers, Frank Carioti, president; Berniece Looney, 
vice-president; Phoebe Steiner, secretary; and Alvin Weekley, 
treasurer. 



As president of Student Council, Thomas Davey led debate 
and action on leading, and often heated, campus issues. Seniors 
serving with him in Council included Anne Domiter, MatUda 
Davis, Robert Duncan, Jean Goncher, Roy Newsome, Isla 
Schnauffer, Clarence Strader, Robert Wentz, and Robert White. 

In addition to their duties in Council, Miss Goncher and 
Duncan also headed Women's League and Men's Union, re- 
spectively. Top posts on leading campus publications were 
filled by Carioti, Chestnut Burr, and Robert Lengacher, Kent 
Stater. 



Annamary Acerra 
steubenville. ohio 

ED History 



William C. Aldrich 
aurora, ohio 

Business Administration 



Morton Alexander 
kent. ohio 

LA Art 



LOIS L. Allyn 
AKRON, OHIO 
ED Business 




Carolyn A. Adambtz 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
LA Sociology 



Vincent R. Alessi 
st. clair, ohio 

ED Industrial Arts 



Richard Alexander 
canton, ohio 

ED Health and Physical 



Mary E. Altman 
bryan, ohio 

BA General Busin 




Janice K. Barden 
cuyahoga falls, o. 

BA Industrial Psychology 



Dolores F. Bashline 
akron. ohio 

ED History 



Gene M. Beachly 
cuyahoga falls. o. 

BA Accounting 



Jerry L. Bergem 
eucud. ohio 

ED Mathematic 




Hal Barden 

cuyahoga falls. o. 

BA Accounting 



Ross T. Barnes 

CLEVELAND HTS.. O. 
ED Industrial Arts 



Edwin L. Bates 
wadsworth. ohio 

BA General Business 



Janet Beattie 
ashland. ohio 

ED Secretarial Science 



98 



Barbara Ashby 
canton, ohio 

ED Social Studies 



Robert A. Bader 

DUBOIS, IOWA 
Business Administration 



Marjorie a. Bamberger 
canton, ohio 

ED Elementary Education 



CLASS OFFICERS: 




Frank Carioti, Jr. 






President 


Berniece Looney 






Vice-President 


Phoebe Steiner 






Secretary 


Alvin Weekley 






Treasurer 



ILLIAM J. AMRINE 
BRIDGEPORT, OHIO 
BA Accounting 




Calvin Anweiler 
akron, ohio 

BA Merchandising 




Bonnie J. Avant 

AKRON, OHIO 

LA Home Economics 



k 




|5 



4. 



ii^ 



Frank Carioti, Jr. 



Jack T. Baird 
cleveland. ohio 

LA Biology 






t-^f- 



Y 






Alvin Weekley 



Berniece Looney 

Phoebe Steiner 



John M. Blair 

chagrin falls, OHIO 
ED Alt 




m^iM 



Shirley J. Blood 

CONNEAUT, OHIO 
ED English 



Ernest C. Bodey 
cleveland, ohio 

la Chemistry 



Delbert C. Bosley 
akron, ohio 

BA Matkcting 




«! N E. Blackmore 

j SRON, OHIO 
^ Marketing 



VIRGINIA Block 
pleasantville, n. j. 

LA Art 



Robert C. Blumer 
chagrin falls, ohio 

LA Journalism 



Frank C. Bond 
medina, ohio 

BA General Business 



99 



John O. Botu 
salem, ohio 

BA Marketing 

Frank Boyd, Jr. 
canton, ohio 

BA Air and General 

Traffic Management 



James E. Brainard 
canton, ohio 

LA Psychology 

Joy 1. Brand 

millersburg, ohio 

ED Home Economics 



Martha A. Brandt 

NILES, OHIO 

ED Elementary Education 

Louise Brooks 

cuyahoga falls, o. 

LA Sociology 



Paul H. Brooks 
cleveland, ohio 

LA Mathematics 

Frank Broughton 
akron, ohio 

BA Accounting 



Leone R. Broughton 
chardon, ohio 

ED Elementary Education 

Peter D. Brown 
kent, ohio 

ED Mathematics 



Marion A. Bruns 

RAVENNA, OHIO 
LA English 

JiMMiE L. Bullock 

CUYAHOGA FALLS, O. 
LA Speech 



Dona Mae Burkhardt 
rocky river, ohio 

LA Speech 

Dona May Burkhardt 
kent, ohio 

BA Personnel 



Carl Burnett 

steubenville, ohio 

Business Administration 

WILLIAM L. Bush 

TALLMADGE, OHIO 
LA Pre-Law 





CftLOt 



Snow adds splendor to the 
sharp outline of the Train- 
ing School. 



Margery Button 
cleveland, ohio 

ED Elementan' Education 

Anthony J. Cacioppo 

RAVENNA, OHIO 
la Psychology 



WILLIAM J. CADY 
AKRON, OHIO 
LA Political Science 

Gae C. Caldren 

UNIONTOWN, OHIO 
ED Chemistry 



Leonard R. Carey 
akron, ohio 

ED Industrial Arts 

Frank Carioti, Jr. 
lakewood, ohio 

LA Journalism 



Carl E. Carrothers 
cuyahoga falls. o. 

BA Accounting 

Robert J. Casey 

YOUNGSTOWN. OHIO 
LA Journalism 



Patricia Marie Casto 
cuyahoga falls, o. 

BA Secretarial Science 

Joel W. Chastain 
massillon, ohio 

LA Physics 



JOHN S. Chill, Jr. 
warren, omo 

LA Spanish 



100 



48 



The summer campus sup- 
ports KSU's reputation for 
outstanding beauty. 



Joseph J. Ciresi 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
ED Secretarial Science 

Robert J. Clark 

KENT, OHIO 

BA Factory Management 



DOTTIE L. CLEVENGER 
BARBERTON, OHIO 
ED General Business 

Donald J. Clough 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
BA Industrial 
Management 



Ronald J. Cohen 

NEWARK, N. J. 

BA General Business 

Marion Cole 

east cleveland, o. 

LA Journalism, English 



Milton S. Compton 
akron, ohio 

BA Finance 

Perry D. Conklb 
mt. vernon, ohio 

BA Air and General 

Traffic Management 



Beverly B. Cook 
ravenna, ohio 

BA Personnel 

Jeanne M. Cook 
kent, ohio 

LA Speech 



Wilbur F. Cooper 
canton, ohio 

BA General Business 

Adelle M. Covault 
lorain, ohio 

ED Elementary Education 



im 




Janice M. Cover 
poland, ohio 

BA Secretarial Science 

Warren D. Craigo 
sugarcreek, ohio 

ED Mathematics 



Gertrude S. Crawford 
akron, ohio 

LA Sociology 

ELEANOR M. CROUSE 
NORTH LIMA, OHIO 
ED Comprehensive Social 



Thomas Curphey 
windham, ohio 

Business Administration 

John Dan, Jr. 
salem, ohio 

Business Administration 



Alice Danyluke 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 
ED Secretarial Science 

\ AN B. Darby 

EAST BANK, W. VA. 
LA Psychology 



Mabel K. Davey 
kent, ohio 

LA Sociology 

I'HOMAS E. DaVEY 
KENT, OHIO 
LA History, Geography 



Arthur F. Davis 
mogadore, ohio 

ED Biology 

Helen J. Davis 

SALINEVILLE. OHIO 
ED Home Economics 



Matilda M. Davis 
kent, ohio 

ED Speech 

Norma L. Davis 
boston, ohio 

ED Elementary Education 



Patrick P. Del Vecchio 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

CONN. 

BA Transportation 

John A. Demming 

CANTON. OHIO 

BA Industrial Psychology 



Jean M. De Pompei 
bedford, ohio 

ED Secretarial Science 

June M. Derks 
akron, ohio 

ED Spanish 



Virginia De Rose 
akron, ohio 

LA English 

Vernon Bert Dettor 
balboa, canal zone 

LA Premedicine 



BETTE J. DiECKMANN 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 
LA Psychology 

Elmer C. Dietz, Jr. 
stow, ohio 

BA Personnel 



Leo a. Di Nuoscio 

AKRON, OHIO 
Business Administration 

Herbert P. Divney 

RAVENNA. OHIO 
LA Management 



Anne T. Domiter 

LAKEWOOD, OHIO 

BA Secretarial Science 

Josephine G. Douglass 
kent, ohio 

la English 



Clarence J. Dover 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
LA Journalism 

Richard E. Downen 
toronto, ohio 

BA Marketing 



Robert J. Durivage 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 
BA Accounting 

Rees L. Evans 

honolulu, hawaii 

LA Journalism 



Maxine J. Evelyn 

AKRON, OHIO 
LA Sociology 

William Gluvna 
lakewood, ohio 

Business Administration 





CH^LOt 



Play ball! The World Se- 
ries is on the air. 



Barbara A. Ewell 

RAVENNA, OHIO 
ED Secretarial Science 

Frank L. Fair 
kent, ohio 

Business Administration 



Mary Lou Farrell 
lisbon, ohio 

LA English 

Betty B. Faulds 
cleveland, ohio 

ED Health and Physical 



Felice Faust 
kent. ohio 

LA Speech 

Marily-n L. Ferguson 
east palestine, ohio 

ED Social Science 



William J. Fike 

AKRON. OHIO 
LA Journalism 

JOHN W. FiNNEGAN 
MARION. OHIO 
LA Mathematics 



Suzanne Fletcher 
lakewood. ohio 



Earl Ford 

cleveland. ohio 

ED Biology 



AUDRIE J. FORNSHELL 
KENT, OHIO 
LA Spanish 

JOSEPH H. FRASCA 
FLUSHING. N. Y. 
BA Political Science 



102 



48 



Bob Hoyt, Spring Stater 
"captain," crowns Rowboat 
Regatta queen, Barbara 
Berg. 



Rudolph J. Fruscella 

AKRON, OHIO 

Business Adminiscration 

Betty A. Fulkerson 

CLEVELAND. OHIO 
LA Art 



John H. Furrer 
ravenna, ohio 

ED Social Studies 

Wesley L. Gaab 
independence, ohio 

LA Biology 



Paul C. Geisinger 
bugholz, ohio 

BA Factory Management 

Emil George 
canton, ohio 

LA Chemistry 



William G. Giesse 
cleveland. ohio 

BA General Business 

Roy G. Gifford 
akron, ohio 

BA Air Traffic 



Janet L. Gillespie 
akron, ohio 

LA Speech 

Kenneth K. Goldstein 

new YORK. N. Y. 
LA Journalism 



Jean E. Goncher 

east CLEVELAND, O. 
LA Journalism 

Sam Gordon 
akron, ohio 

LA Sociology 



103 




James M. Gossett 
kent, ohio 

LA Mathematics 

Laurel S. Gradolph 

stow, OHIO 
LA English 



Ralph Graven 
akron, ohio 

Business AdministratioB 

Ann E. Gray 

KENT, OHIO 
LA Journalism 



Guy W. Grazier 
kent, ohio 

LA Premedicine 

Allen Greenberg 
newark, n. j. 

BA Industrial 
Management 



Edward J, Grendel 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
BA Foreign Commerce 

Stanley H. Grendel 
cleveland, ohio 

BA Personnel 



Ernest B. Grimm 
cleveland, ohio 

BA General Business 

Donald D. Gritton 
toronto, ohio 

BA Air Traffic 



Roberta Grube 
lorain, ohio 

ED Elementary Education 

Janet S. Harmon 
columbus, ohio 

LA Social Science 



Wm. a. Harrington 
strongsville, ohio 

ED Industrial Arts 

Edward E. Harsa 
cleveland, ohio 

BA General Business 



Marilyn R. Harsha 
ravenna, ohio 

BA Secretarial Science 

Dale L. Hawk 
akron, ohio 

ED Accounting 



Russell F. Hawsman 
barberton, ohio 

BA Marketing 

WILLIAM L. HeARN 
RAVENNA, OHIO 
BA Air Traffic 



George C. Heaslip 
merrick, n. y, 

LA Jouroalism 

WILLARD E. HeINTZ 
AKRON, OHIO 
ED Health and Physical 



Robert H. Henderson 
akron, ohio 

LA Zoology 

Betty G. Hess 
akron, ohio 

ED High School 



Doris J. Heupel 

AKRON, OHIO 

BA Secretarial Science 

Hazel P. Himelrigh 

BARBERTON, OHIO 
ED Comprehensive 



Harold K. Hirt 
kent, ohio 

LA Chemistry 

Ruth E. Hoehn 
warren, ohio 

LA Psychology 



Olive Holmes 

MASSILLON, OHIO 
LA English 

VERNON Hood 

CANHELD, OHIO 

ED Health and Physical 



DOROTHY A. Hopkins 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

ED Kindergarten-Primary 

Loren Hostetler 
barrs mills, ohio 

ED Industrial Arts 



Robert Hostetler 
strasburg, ohio 

BA Accounting 

Elizabeth Hoy 
cleveland, ohio 

ED Chemistry 





e^iox. 



Lowry Hall reflects the se- 
renity of the quiet early 
evening on campus. 



Don E. Hoyt 

BELLEFONTAINE, OHIO 
LA English 

R, E. Hoyt 

bellefontaine, ohio 

LA Journalism 



James Hudkins 

cuyahoga falls, o. 

ED Industrial Arts 

Cecil Huff 

CUYAHOGA falls, O. 
LA Mathematics 



William Hugo 
dayton, ohio 

BA Accounting 

Herbert Hull 
akron, ohio 

Business Administration 



Phyllis Hum 

east palestine, ohio 

LA English 

Warren Hunt 
bedford. ohio 

LA Mathematics 



Jack L, Hurowitz 

new HAVEN. CONN. 
BA Industrial 

Management 

Charles D. Infield 
sharon, pa. 

ED Psychology, Biology 



Alice L. Israel 
cleveland, ohio 

ED Health and Physical 
Education 

MILAN A. JAKSIC 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 
BA Industrial 
Management 



104 



48 



Many more seniors will 
take inspiration from the 
traditional ivy of Merrill 
Hall. 



Norma Lee Jenkins 
niles, ohio 

LA Home Economics 

Arthur W. Johnson 
el monte, cauf. 

ED Music 



Ethel M. Johnson 
kent, ohio 

ED Home Economics 

Homer E. Johnson 
kent, ohio 

BA Personnel 

Management 



Robert W. Jones 
louisville, ohio 

LA Biology 

Ruth E. Kadow 
berea, ohio 

ED Secretarial Science 



Hugh Kailan 
bombay. india 

LA Biology 

Henry J. Kallal 
akron, ohio 

BA Marketing 



Thomas T. Kallis 
lorain, ohio 

BA Retail Matketing 

Paul W. Kalstrom 
akron, ohio 

BA Accounting 



Irene N. Kelbaugh 

CUYAHOGA falls, O. 
ED Psychology, English 

Walter T. Keller 

south EUCLID, OHIO 
ED Biology, Social 



Science 



105 




John F. Kelley 
AKRON, OHIO 
ED Industrial Arts 

James G. Kenski 
cleveland, ohio 

ED Mathematics 



GLORIA Jean Kessler 

ELITUA, OHIO 
ED Mathematics 

Ralph H. Kimball 
akron, ohio 

la Industrial Engineering 



Charles R. Kindle 
bellaire, ohio 

BA Accounting 

IiRwiN J. Klein 

NILES, OHIO 
ED Social Studies. 
Sociology 



Ruth E. Klein 

new BRIGHTON, PA. 

LA Zoology 

Anthony Klipsic 
pittsburgh, pa. 

ED Health and Physical 



Robert Knapp 
kent, ohio 

BA Industrial Psychology 

ri.EANORE KNEBLEWICZ 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 
ED History, Social Science 



Dorothy J. Kneubuehl 

N PHILADELPHIA, O. 
ED Elementary Education 

Frank Koberna 
hudson, ohio 

Business Administration 



Donald Koerlin 
cleveland. ohio 

LA Journalism 

Julian Y. Kofsky 
cleveland. ohio 

BA Advertising 



Helen A. Kolk 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 

ED Elementary Education 

Thomas F. Kot 
yorkville, ohio 

ED Industrial Arts 



Ralph E. Kreiger 
massillon, ohio 

BA Marketing 

Robert Lee Kreyssig 
euclid, ohio 

ED Mathematics 



William N. Kuendig 
canton, ohio 

BA Commerce 

Wesley A. Kurtz 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
BA General Business 



Charles Q. Lafferty 
pittsburgh, pa. 

BA Air Transportation. 
Traffic Management 

Mblvin Lampe 
parma, ohio 

BA General Business 



Wanda L. Lashley 
stow, ohio 

LA Political Science 

John Laurenson 
canton, ohio 

BA Business 



Isabel Lee 

youngstown, ohio 

LA Zoology(Premedicine) 

Charles A. Lehman 

AKRON, OHIO 
ED Chemistry 



Grace E. Lemley 
cuyahoga falls, o. 

BA Secretarial Science 

Mavis J. Lemmons 

AKRON, OHIO 
LA Art 



Marion R. Lemponen 
ashtabula, ohio 

ED Spanish 

Robert D. Lengacher 
sugarcreek, ohio 

LA Journalism, History 



Arnold W. Lewis 
canton, ohio 

BA Public Administration 

Jean M. Leyman 
canton, ohio 

BA Secretarial Science 





enLOt 



Mrs. Harriet Russell re- 
ceived the title of "Queen 
Mother" for 1947 from 
Bob Blumer. 



RJCHARD C. LIMBERT 
CANTON, OHIO 
ED Biology 

George E. Lintnbr 
akron, ohio 

ED Political Science, 
Social Smdies 



Rae Ellen Lohrke 
cleveland. ohio 

ED Kindergarten-Primary 

Berniece Looney 
warren, ohio 

ED Health and Physical 



Velois E. Loudon 
hanoverton, ohio 

ED English 

Marian E. Lower 
kent, ohio 

ED Art 



Dorothy W. Luck 
canton, ohio 

ED Speech 

C. H. McCausland, Jr. 

STEUBENVILLE, OHIO 
ED Mathematics 



Howard S. McCune 
akron, ohio 

BA General Marketing 

Eileen M. McGinley 
cleveland, ohio 

LA Speech 



Albert J. McGoogan 

CLEVELAND. OHIO 
BA Accounting 

Harlan W. McGrail 
akron, ohio 

BA Commerce 



106 



48 



KSU is on the air as Alan 
Freed interviews Student 
Council president, Tom 
Davey. 



Robert McKeb 
eucud, ohio 

BA Accouatiog 

Nancy M. McNutt 
snyder, n. y. 

ED Health and Physical 



John F. McVay 

cuyahoga falls, o. [> 

LA Premedicine 

Marlin W. Mack 

UMA, OHIO 
ED History 



Louise G. Mackenroth 
silver lake, ohio 

LA Sociology 

Robert Mageb 
canton, ohio 

BA General Business 



Ralph F. Marquardt 
AKRON, orao 

BA Marketing 

Kenneth W. Marty 
salem, ohio 

la Chemistry 



Duane L. May 
warren, ohio 

BA Accounting 

Leo a. May 

cleveland, ohio 

ED Industrial Arts 



Grayce M. Mays 
garfield hts.. ohio 

LA Psychology 

Walter F. Meads 
delphos, ohio 

BA General Business 



107 




Donald E. Mears 
cleveland, ohio 

LA Chemistry 

ELEANOR L. MECK 
BUCYRUS, OHIO 
LA Speech, Journalism 



WM. W. Messersmith 
COLUMBIANA. OHIO 
BA Marketing 

Genevieve K. Messik 
canton, ohio 

ED Kindergarten-Primary 



John R. Messuri 
cleveland, ohio 

LA Political Science 

James G. Meyer 
sharon, pa. 

ED Industrial Arts 



Mary E. Michel 
kent, ohio 

BA Personnel 

Richard B. Middaugh 
port jervis, n. y. 

ED Health and Physical 
Education 



Charles P. Mihalko 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
ED Social Studies 

\ Lydia Mihok 

cleveland, ohio 

ED Speech 



Howard H. Milar 
n. philadelphia, o. 

BA Marketing 

John M. Miller 
gnadenhutten, o. 

LA Psychology 



Margaret A. Miller 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 
ED English 

Violet M. Miller 
ravenna, ohio 

ED Kindergarten-Primary 



Nicholas J. Mizeres 

CANTON, OHIO 
LA Premedicine 

Florian W. Mocilnikar 
cleveland, ohio 

LA French 



Mary A. Moher 

EAST CLEVELAND, O. 
Education 

George M. Mokodean 
canton, ohio 

ED Social Science 



Michael J. Mokodean 

CANTON, OHIO 
ED Accounting 

Donald A. Moorb 

KENT, OHIO 
ED Mathematics 



Jay p. Moore 
mantua, ohio 

BA General Business 

John H. Moore 

BELLAIRE, OHIO 
ED History 



Elsie Rodgers Moritz 
salamanca, n. y. 

ED History 

William C. Moritz 
cleveland, ohio 

ED Health and Physical 



KATHRYN M. Morsch 
NEWTON FALLS, OHIO 
ED Art 

Tom E. Moses 
cleveland, ohio 

LA Sociology 



James R. Muir 
akron, ohio 

ED Journalism 

Raymond Mullaly 
youngstown, ohio 

LA Journalism 



Dayton L. Mullen 
akron, ohio 

BA General Business 

Rella Muntean 
usbon, ohio 

ED English 



Eugene E. Myer 
salem, ohio 

ED, BA 

Sales Merchandising 

Ruth M. Myers 
east palestine, o. 

ED Home Economics 





en^wx. 



The Atrium steps make a 
symbolic ladder pattern 
leading to the hilltop cam- 
pus. 



William L. Myers 
canton, ohio 

BA Marketing 

ARTHUR E. NASH 
KENT, OHIO 
LA Economics 



JOSEPH G. NESTICH 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 
ED Industrial Arts 

DWIGHT N. Netzly 
NAVARRE, OHIO 
BA Accounting 



Howard S. Netzly 
navarre, ohio 

ED Psychology, 
Social Smdies 



iRWIN R. NEWHOUSE 
SHAKER HEIGHTS. O. 
BA Accounting 



Roy E. Newsome 
WARREN, omo 

BA Advertising 

F. Gregg Ney 
meadville, pa. 

LA Zoology 



Robert C. Norris 
mansfield, ohio 

BA General Business 

DoYLE C. Nutter 

TIFFIN, OHIO 

ED Health and Physical 



Dominic J. Palumbo 
cleveland, ohio 

BA Marketing 

Clarence L. Panatzer 
akron, ohio 

BA Foreign Trade 



108 



48 



mUl^ 



Summer foliage frames the 
east wing cafeteria of Low- 
ry Hall. 



George Pappas 
akron, ohio 

ED Health and Physical 



Bessie K. Pardee 
stow, ohio 

ED English 



George W. Pelton 
niles, ohio 

ED Health and Physical 



Joseph J. Perconti 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
ED Industrial Arts 



Michael Perez 
massillon. ohio 

BA Personnel 

Bernard J. Petit 

CANTON, OHIO 
BA Accounting 



Geraldine J. Petzel 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
ED Speech 

Douglas J. Phillips 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
ED Industrial Arts 



Nadine M. Phillips 
aluance, ohio 

ED Kindergarten-Primary 

Mario R. Piastrelli 
cleveland, ohio 

ED Industrial Arts 



Margaret E. Pinkerton 

eONNEAUT, OHIO 

ED Elementary Education 

Clyde L. Pinkston 
akron, ohio 

BA Commerce 



109 




Arlo D. Plough 
ravenna. ohio 

LA Mathematics 

Peter T. Pompllo 
cleveland, ohio 

LA Psychology 



Catherine Poth 
massillon, ohio 

ED Elementary Education 

Robert E. Powers 
tallmadge, ohio 

BA Marketing 



Gay J. Provo 

WICKLIFFE. OHIO 
LA English 

Miriam R. Pugh 

MANSnELD, OHIO 
LA Speech 



Theresa A. Pugliesb 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
ED Speech 

Ruth E. Purdy 
akron, ohio 

BA Retailing 



Charles R. Quimby 
uhrichsville, ohio 

I BA Finance 

John B. Quinn 
canton. ohio 

BA Personnel 
Management 



Kenneth M. Rake 
cleveland, ohio 

ED Social Studies, 
History 

Richard H. Reash 
ravenna. ohio 

ED Health and Physical 



James B. Rector 
meadville, pa. 

BA Marketing 

Robert T. Rector 

meadville, pa. 

BA Marketing 



James C Rhoads 

ST. CLAIR, pa. 
BA Marketing 

GLENN A. Rice 

CANTON, OHIO 
LA English 



Martha Jane Riley 
miles, ohio 

ED Elementary Education 

Richard Riley 
dover, ohio 

ED Health and Physical 
Education 



Fayne E. Ritzman 
MOGADORE, OHIO 
ED Home Economics 

Robert C. Roberts 
parma, ohio 

LA Chemistry 



Audrey M. Roche 
clinton, ohio 

LA Home Economics 

Jennie H. Rocko 
toronto, ohio 

ED Elementary Education 



W. H. ROHRER 
MALVERN, OHIO 
ED Mathematics 

Dorothy J. Rose 

NILES, OHIO 
ED English 



Ruby M. Roshon 
waynesburg, ohio 

ED English 

Ernest A. Rowland, Jr. 

LODI, OHIO 
LA Journalism 



Alfred Rubin 

CA>JT0N, OHIO 
BA Accounting 

Marvin Rubin 

canton, OHIO 
BA Accounting 



Robert W. Ruggles 

east CLEVELAND, O. 
BA Marketing 

Harriette R. Russell 
akron, ohio 

ED Health and Physical 



Education 



Rudy Ruzich 
cleveland, ohio 

BA Personnel 

Laurence L. Sauber 
barberton, ohio 

LA Biology 





emot 



"Slightly tipsy," Janet Gil- 
lespie faces a family crisis 
in "The Late George . . ." 



John T. Schick 
canton, ohio 

BA Accounting 

Claudia F. Schipchik 
parma, ohio 

ED Elementary Education 



Ethel M. Schirmer 
lorain, ohio 

LA Journalism 

Joseph F. Schmiedl 
kent, ohio 

LA Psychology 



Lois M. Schmotzef 
cleveland, ohio 

LA Psychology, Sociology 

ISLA M. Schnauffer 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 
ED Secretarial Science 



Oliver J. Schneider 

RAVENNA, OHIO 
LA Political Science 

Robert W. Schneider 
akron. ohio 

BA Personnel 



Wilbur J. Schneider 

RAVENNA, OHIO 
ED Social Science 

John R. Schwartz 

canton. OHIO 
BA General Business 



Marylou Scribner 
kent, ohio 

ED Health and Physical 



Margaret J. Scullion 

CLEVELAND HTS.. OHIO 
ED Elementary Education 



110 



48 



All in fun, "Inky" shows 
queen contestants how to 
act before a contest judge. 



George Simstead 
windham, ohio 



Arthur P. Seyler 

CLEVELAND HTS.. OHIO 
BA General Marketing 



Harry P. Shaheen 

CANTON, OHIO 
BA Marketing 

Bernard J. Sharkey 

NILES, OHIO 
BA Industrial 
Management 



Dorothy J. Shay 

maple HEIGHTS. OHIO 
LA speech 

Robert S. Sheets 
columbiana, ohio 

ED Mathematics 



Ruthann Shelar 
niles, ohio 

ED Art 

Walter O. Shilling 
massillon, ohio 

BA Marketing 



Donald F. Shook 
cuyahoga falls, o. 

LA Mathematics 

Charles J. Silva 

WINDHAM, OHIO 
BA Biology 



Richard C. Singer 

canton, OHIO 
BA Marketing 

John C. Skelly 
akron, ohio 

BA Commerce 



111 




Eileen Smith 
kent, ohio 

ED Elementary Hducatioa 

Newman T. Smith 
peoria, ilunois 

BA Air Traffic 



Helen B. Sorrels 
akron. ohio 

ED Health and Physical 
Education 

Janet E. Sowry 
dorset, ohio 

ED History 



Frank H. Spechalskb 
berea, ohio 

ED Health and Physical 
Education 

Herman A. Speck 

LORAIN, OHIO 

BA General Business 



Robert W. Squires 
barberton. ohio 

LA Preraedicine 

June K. Stahlman 
kent, ohio 

LA Sociology 



Dale L. Stanford 
north lawrence, o. 

ED Music 

Betty V, Stanley 

GARRETTSVILLE, OHIO 
LA Latin 



Russell N. Stanton 
ashtabula, ohio 

BA Accounting 

Ralph E. Steere 
long island, n. y. 

BA Applied Arts 



June M. Steigerwald 
canton, ohio 

ED Spanish 

Charles F. Stein 
canton, ohio 

ED Industrial Arts 



PHOEBE STEINER 
ORRVILLE, OHIO 
ED Kindergarten-Primary 

Sylvia Steiner 

cleveland hts., ohio 

ED Kindergarten-Primary 



Alice M. Stephens 
sufheld, ohio 

ED Home Economics 

Frank C. Stevens 
weaverville, n. c. 

ED Elementary Education 



Richard M. Stewart 
akron, ohio 

LA Political Science 



Robert J. Stewart 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
ED Industrial Arts 



Clarence E. Strader 

BARBERTON, OHIO 
LA Political Science 

Marilyn V. Straight 

KENT, OHIO 
la Premedicine 



George W. Streby 
fredericktown, o. 

ED Health and Physical 



Merle E. Strong 
berlin center, ohio 

ED Industrial Arts 



WILLIAM A. STUMPF 
SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 
BA Accounting 

James L. Sturrock 
orwell, ohio 

ED Biology 



Lois Jean Stutz 

SHALERSVILLE, OHIO 
BA Secretatial Science 

William C. Sudeck 

ALUANCE, OHIO 

ED Health and Physical 



Stephen Szalay 
akp.on, ohio 

BA General Business 

GWEN SZILAGYI 
HIRAM, OHIO 
LA Political Science 



Eleanor A. Tarchanin 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 
ED Social Studies 

Laurice M. Taylor 
ashtabula. ohio 

ED Elementary Education 





cfttat 



A stroll in the fog or in 
the moonlight — a pleasant 
end to any date. 



Leonard Taylor 
new york, n. y. 

BA Foreign Trade 

Larry p. Thies 

stow, OHIO 
LA Chemistry 



Ruth M. Thornbladh 
manchester, conn. 

LA Journalism 

George B. Towner 
brady lake, ohio 

BA Personnel 



W. Ernest Translateur 

FOREST hills, N. Y. 
BA Traffic Management 

Irene Trembly 
cleveland, ohio 

ED Secretarial Science 



Frank J. Trenta 

BARBERTON, OHIO 
ED Chemistry 

Irene E. Tryon 
akron, ohio 

LA Home Economics 



Robert D. Tubaugh 
ravenna, ohio 

ED Mathematics 

Joseph E. Urban 
cleveland, ohio 

BA General Business 



Don W. Varner 
akron, ohio 

LA Biology 

Kathleen J. Vaughan 

AKRON, OHIO 
ED Business 

Comprehension 



112 



48 



Senior women may have 
many memories of their 
freshman year in Moulton 
Hall. 



Charles H. Vaughn 
akron, ohio 

LA Economics 

Paul W. Vaughn 
akron, ohio 

BA Personnel 



Frank P. Vendely 

FAIRPORT HARBOR, O. 
BA Accounting 

Vincent G. Vitale 
oakland, n. j. 

ED Health and Physical 



Jack Waggoner 
akron, ohio 

BA Marketing 

John T. Walton 
ft, myers beach, fla. 

BA General Business 



Marjorie F. Walton 
cleveland, ohio 

BA General Business 

Genevieve L. Wample 
falconer, n. y. 

LA Health and Physical 



Edmund Wanner 
columbus, ohio 

LA Premedicine 

John E. Warner 

LEAVITTSBURG, OHIO 
LA Chemistry 



Harold D. Washburn 
cuyahoga falls, o. 

BA Marketing 

Fred J. Watson 

FORD CITY, PA. 
ED Social Studies 



113 




Roderick N. Watts 

north canton, OHIO 
BA Accounting 

Lois W. Webb 
cleveland, ohio 

BA Personnel 



Alvin Weekley 
canton, ohio 

LA Economics 

Glenn D. Weigand 
salem. ohio 

la Biology 



L. Janet Weimer 

KENT, OHIO 

ED Elementary Education 

Gerald Weir 
jefferson, ohio 

BA General Business 



Robert G. White 

CUYAHOGA falls, O. 
LA Speech 

Doris E. Wilkes 
cleveland, ohio 

LA Philosophy, English 



G. William Williams 

AKRON, OHIO 
ED Music 

Katherine L. Williams 
cleveland hts., ohio 

ED Home Economics 



Max Williams 
coshocton, ohio 

BA General Business 

Marilyn E. Wilms 
salem, ohio 

LA Chemistry 



Doris M. Winick 

CANTON, OHIO 
ED Speech 

Shirley A. Wirth 

PALESTINE, OHIO 
LA Psychology 



Donald W. Wise 
parma, ohio 

ED Accounting 

JANELL I. Wise 

HUBBARD, OHIO 

ED Kindergarten-Primary 



William E. Wolf 
cuyahoga falls, o. 

LA Chemistry 

Richard P. Wolfe 

NEW LONDON. OHIO 
ED Health and Physical 



Walter N. Wolfe 

BRADY lake, OHIO 
BA Marketing 

Don C. Wrentmore 
cleveland, ohio 

BA Personnel 



George Wright 

youngstown, ohio 

LA Economics 

Joe Wyatt 

HUNTSBERG. OHIO 
ED History 



Stanley N. Yamokoski 
kent, ohio 

LA Zoology 

Betty Yount 
akron, ohio 




Alumni hear their presi- 
dent, Joe Kelly, at the an- 
nual Homecoming Day 
banquet. 



George E. Zingery 
kent, ohio 

BA Foreign Trade 

James W. Zingery 
new philadelphla, o. 

BA Indus. Psychological 
Procedures 




TIj'OR the last four years commencement-conscious 
-'- seniors have turned to their advisor, Dr. Gerald H. 
Chapman, associate professor of chemistry. 

Always the calming influence during graduation 
rehearsals and exercises, Dr. Chapman serves as mar- 
shall of the commencement parade and head of the 
commencement committee. 

Supervision of finances and senior activities also 
fall v/ithin Dr. Chapman's responsibilities as class 
advisor. However, these problems are familiar to the 
portly professor who has been associated with the 
university as a student or faculty member since 1911. 



Gerald H. Chapman 



114 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



SETTING an example in accomplishment, mem- 
bers of the Kent State University Alumni Asso- 
ciation executive council drove to Kent each month 
from every northeastern Ohio county, to attend the 
informal luncheon meetings where alumni plans were 
carefully formulated. 

Led by Joseph D. Kelly, '33, alumni functioned 
under a new constitution and the number of asso- 
ciation members was increased through an intensive 
enrollment drive. 

Two new chapters were added during 1947-48, 
in Ashtabula and Mahoning counties. These joined 
the ranks of nine clubs already active in Cuyahoga, 
Summit, Portage and Stark counties. 

Keeping alumni well-informed of work by their 
club officers, as well as providing class notes and 
campus news, the Kent Alumnus continued its quar- 
terly publication. Marion Cole, editor for the fourth 
year, was assisted by Robert Weymueller until April, 
when he assumed complete charge. 




Alumnus editor, Robert Weymueller, 
assumes the duties of graduating editor, 
Maiion Cole. 



FIRST ROW: Bernice Oswald, Gladys Kelly, Marvin Johnson, Raymond Trachsel, Joseph Kelly. 
SECOND ROW: Robert Weymueller. Marion Cole, Evelyn Weston. Malvern Randels. 




115 




4 9 



TT TITH an eye toward the future, junior class officers not 
* ^ only planned this year's activities well in advance, but 
even devised a constitution for succeeding junior classes. 

The beginning of a new tradition was established when the 
class of '49 decided to finance a Spring dance honoring the 
seniors. Proceeds of this Junior-Senior Prom were pledged to 
the Stadium Drive. 

Also new in the university club organization this year was 
the Council of Presidents, composed of heads of all student 
clubs, honoraries, fraternities, and sororities. A junior, Curt 
Sarff, the council's first chairman, was instrumental in the or- 
ganization's founding. With Phyllis Robbins he also repre- 
sented his class on Student Council. 



Phil Brustein emerged victorious in the hotly-contested class 
election. Shating the officer slate with him was a feminine trio 
consisting of Dawn Kerkhof, vice-president; Connie Norris, 
secretary; and Jane Wrentmore, treasurer. 

Robert Farnsworth and Wallace Krivoy held offices in Men's 
Union and Margaret Boone was a Women's League leader. 
John Finn edited the Kent Stater in the Winter quarter. 

Six men and six women from the class were initiated into 
Blue Key and Cardinal Key, national service honoraries. Those 
pledged were Janet Gillespie, Doris Heupel, Ann Irons, Martha 
Lansinger, Miss Robbins, and Alice Jean Watson, to Cardinal 
Key; and Finn, John Forresr, Krivoy, Richard Paskert, Sarff, 
and Donald Warman, to Blue Key. 



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■■■■' 


Junior Class Officers 


Dawn Kerk- 










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hof, 


vice-president; Phil Brustein, presi- 








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; Jane Wrentmore, treasurer; Con- 








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Norris, secretary. 






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116 




FIRST ROW; James Powers, Ray Reno, Ray Borman. 
SECOND ROW: Rosemary Morris, Beatrice Bachman. 



FIRST ROW Angeline Scourcos, Audrey Kana, Mary 

Farmer. 
SECOND ROW: James Weber, Richard Durst 




FIRST ROW: Ernest Port, Jess Richmond, Paul Schall. 
SECOND ROW: Edward Hamrle, Donald Anderson, Gene 
Snyder. 



FIRST ROW Edna Brown, Bonnie Strauss, Ellen Tucker. 
SECOND ROW: Mary Kenneli, Renna Melhuish, Laura 
Bingham. 




FIRST ROW: Gerry Rigby, Alton Foutts, Betty Abbott. 

SECOND ROW: Earl KoMar, Mary Alice Roberts. 



FIRST ROW: Sarah Johnson, Ben Cotton, Richard Johnson. 
SECOND ROW: Richard Dzurec, Henry Bury. 



117 




FIRST ROW: lla Jackson, Addie Pelfrey, Marilyn Kirklond. 
SECOND ROW: Fred Green, William Taylor, George 



FIRST ROW Dorothy Ede, Patricia Schaefer, Cathryn Mulligan. 
SECOND ROW: Gordon Porrish, Robert Singhaus, Hobarf 
Adams. 




FIRST ROW: Denver Sturgil, Robert Wernheimer. 
SECOND ROW: Robert Ashby, Melvin Lompe, Warren 
Sanders. 



FIRST ROW: Janet Crawford, Jean Stonestreet. 
SECOND ROW: Gloria Sherrets, Eileen Young, Blanch 
Trimeloni. 




FIRST ROW: Robert Sonnholter, Carl Albu. 
SECOND ROW: George Ketchy, Virginia Khoenle, Ervin 

Matthews. 



FIRST ROW: Velma Smalt, Jeanne Smith. 
SECOND ROW: Robert Buckley, Virginia Block, Albert 
Stumpe. 




FIRST ROW: Jeannette Barry, Eris May. 

SECOND ROW: Charles Solomon, Betty Rowlen, J. A. 

Manthey. 



FIRST ROW: John Miller, Virgil Costorello, lou Federico. 
SECOND ROW: Philip Botfes, Richard Riggle, Arthur 
Simons. 




118 




FIRST RO C-c-c Muldoon, Fred Hawley. 

SECOND ROW: Ruth Horbaly, Gwendolyn Roybould, Ann 
Antypas, 



FIRST ROW: Jean Anderson, Elizabeth Jones. 

SECOND ROW: James Gray, Samuel Danze, Lloyd Gfeller. 




FIRST ROW: Bruce Brooks, Vernon Kompfer. 

SECOND ROW: Jerry Dantzic, Vic Warner, Gerald Bee- 



FIRST ROW: Martha Lansinger, Chorles Whitehead. 
SECOND ROW: William Saviers, Raymond Demattia, 
Joseph Zsiga. 




FIRST ROW: Roberta Sollberger, Barbara Caldwell. 
SECOND ROW: Roberta Williams, Rosemary Grzincic, 
Charlene Moreland. 



FIRST ROW: Wayne Thomas, Robert Moodie. 
SECOND ROW: Ann Irons, Elaine Chill, Cora David. 




119 




FIRST ROW: David Kaplan, Wayne Beafty, Pat Ceglia. 
SECOND ROW: Robert Brown, Henry D! Lucca. 



FIRST ROW: Robert Zengler, Robert Krais. 
SECOND ROW: lyle Budner, Anthony Reto, Felix Diaz, 
Wallace Kotouch. 




FIRST ROW: Stella Trautz, Edward Troutz, Richard Vogen- 
itz. 

SECOND ROW: Robert Nippier, John Clugh. 



FIRST ROW: Ethelyn Ryder, Frank Leonard. 
SECOND ROW: Pool Leidel, Owen Ham'phill, Robert Wil- 
helm, John Brooks. 




FIRST ROW: Pat Simmons, Mary Lou Parker, Ida Cheruco. 
SECOND ROW: Paul Deck, Harold Yoak. 



FIRST ROW: John Forrest, John Richards. 
SECOND ROW: Lloyd Thomas, Dorothy Knopp, Warren 
Loshley. 




FIRST ROW: Harold Schoonover, Russell Harris, Robert 

Duncan. 
SECOND ROW: Kenneth Crutchley, R. W. Bulgrin. 



FIRST ROW: Vincent Hudec, Lois Hudec, Harry Higley. 
SECOND ROW: James Brindza, Don Armitage. 




FIRST ROW: Bettye Crisp, Richard McAllister, Evelyn Fel- FIRST ROW: Alice Jones, James Langan, Helen Garrison, 

lows. SECOND ROW: Donald Grahe, William Furst. 

SECOND ROW: Thomas Crawford, Robert Danford. 




FIRST ROW: James Wilkins, Jr., William Fogarty, Paul 

Robinson. 
SECOND ROW: James Thomas, Robert Marty. 



FIRST ROW: Dotty Schramm, Kathy Hosfeld, Betty Vey. 
SECOND ROW: Joyce Bates, Lucille Hymon. 




121 




FIRST ROW: Thomas Shubert, Paul Stevenson, Walter 

Jones. 
SECOND ROW: John Pachuta, John Carrel. 



FIRST ROW: Ruth Anne Crawford, Ton! Mittiga, Margaret 

Sawyer. 
SECOND ROW: James Rinier, Jules Du Bar. 




FIRST ROW: Russell Gray, Calvin Anweiler, Wilbur Beal. 
SECOND ROW: Patrick Miladore, Charles Petty. 



FIRST ROW: Carol Klein, Gordon Kirk, Margaret Hissem. 
SECOND ROW: Harold Bantum, George GifFord. 




FIRST ROW: Curtiss Sarff, Jordan Truthan. 
SECOND ROW: William Waidelich, Edward Lynch, Frank 
Kozlowski. 



FIRST ROW: Eleanore Tomasik, Joann Kemp, Gloria Neff. 
SECOND ROW: Nancy Swigart, Eleanore Kolk, Mary Lou 
Smith; 




122 




FIRST ROW; Frances Gaug, Owen Swanson. 
SECOND ROW: Marvin Goer, Ralph Steere, Dominick 
Cocioppo. 



FIRST ROW: Josephine Cook, Morcye Armington. 
SECOND ROW: Edwin Corlcins, Don Livezey, William Hod- 
son. 




FIRST ROW: Robert Kidd, Roy Looper. 

SECOND ROW: Dorothea Helmon, Dorothy Leopold, Ruth 



FIRST ROW: Jean Hammond, Donna Gover, 

SECOND ROW: Wesley Gordon, John Dilling, Peter Ulrich. 




FIRST ROW: Abigail Dickerson, Morjorie Engren. 
SECOND ROW: George Groft, John Moyer, Clare Perez. 



FIRST ROW: William Haase, Bob Towner. 
SECOND ROW: Helen Bishop, Gertrude Moss, Ann Di 
Claudio. 



123 




FIRST ROW: Don Wagner, Neal Manning, Owen Mc- 

Cafferty. 
SECOND ROW: Carlos Davis, Charles Haag. 



FIRST ROW: Francis Herzog, Earl Greaves, Henry Lanzdurf. 
SECOND ROW: AnHlony Simone, Willis Richardson, Willis 
Brown. 




FIRST ROW: William Caskey, Robert Brown. 
SECOND ROW: Laurence Klein, Richard Zevalkink, Gary 
Fox, Edward Isfnick. 



Candy ZiMa, Barbara Berg and Mary Lou Holland relax 
in their quarters that won several Room-of-the-Month Con- 
tests lost spring in Lowry Hall. 




FIRST ROW: Robert Gelczer, Karl Burns. 
SECOND ROW: Gerald Furbish, John Kolo, Harvey Sny- 
der, Robert Cornwell. 



FIRST ROW Jean Miller, Joan Wordell 

SECOND- ROW: Lloyd Miller, Richard Arnold, William Dal- 




FIRST ROW: Jean Tedrick, Jane Wrentmore, Phyllis 

Mikula. 
SECOND ROW: Connie Norris, Nancy Bailey. 



FIRST ROW: Tasmcn Dowding, Fred Hartman. 
SECOND ROW: Milton Kenngott, George Ebel, Russell 
Logon. 




The construction rash spreads to the atrium as a car- 
penter begins work on the new university postoffice. 



FIRST ROW Rachel Jane Thomas, Janet Douglass, Dorothy 

Rice. 
SECOND ROW: Dorothy Miller, Joan McDermott, Muriel 

Swain. 




Professional baseball visits the campus as Bill Veeck, 
president of the Cleveland Indians, addresses on attentive 
I student body. 



FIRST ROW: Frank Zima, Joseph Zoludny. 
SECOND ROW: Glenn Boskett, Robert Morrow, Richard 
Cone. 



125 




FIRST ROW: Everett Jenkins, Jerry Schaaf. 

SECOND ROW: Donald Rupert, Iris Harkins, James Harkins, 



FIRST ROW: Emma Zittlau, Eleanor Jonoitis. 
SECOND ROW: Robert Hildebrand, Virginia Gilcrest, 
William Hawkins. 




FIRST ROW: Hubert Mabe, Tom Saltsman. 

SECOND ROW: Patricia Harrington, Madelyn Goddard, 



FIRST ROW: Steve Brynes, William Schenk. 
SECOND ROW: John Lapunka, Naomi Moses, Wilfred 
Cheethom. 




O R S 




126 




FIRST ROW: Roger Howard, Cletus Fisher. 
SECOND ROW: Ross Whitemyer, Roy Hein, Richard 
Bartchy. 



FIRST ROW: Roy Inscho, Margaret Staib. 
SECOND ROW: Phil Brustein, Richard Paskert, John Van- 
dever. 




FIRST ROW: Charlotte Madison, Kathryn Wells, Barbara FIRST ROW: Stephen Stofsick, Don Swartz. 

Lee- SECOND ROW: Schirrman Johnston, Robert Hersmon, 

SECOND ROW: Katherine Boukas, Don Smith, Ruth Hetting- Archie Erwin. 




FIRST ROW: John Anderson, Carl Hutton. 
.iECOND ROW: Fred Riegler, Ross Lingruen, Al Pete. 



FIRST ROW: Frank Klein, Charles Walker. 
SECOND ROW: Mearle Eisenhart, Stephen Szalay, Robert 
McGowan, 




J U N I 



iwmmE:^-''"fm 




111 




FIRST ROW; Raymond Gionnamore, Hubert Howes, 
SECOND ROW: Leonard Jarvis, Jock Bernhardt, Don Kirk- 
patrick. 



FIRST ROW: Fay Morris, Patrick Sullivan, Verna Krause. 
SECOND ROW: Harold Greenwald, Ray Murray. 




FIRST ROW: Robert Carney, Elton Newman, James Satte- 

son. 
SECOND ROW Carl Jordon, John Whipple. 



FIRST ROW: Alan Poese, Port Hall. 

SECOND ROW: Don Moore, Glenn Parker, Glenn Barber. 




FIRST ROW: John Wolcott, Louise Jones, Jock Baker. 
SECOND ROW: Frank Longo, Frank Fedorka. 



FIRST ROW: Wayne Grubaugh, George Gibbons, Morris 

Galloway. 
SECOND ROW: Robert Broski, Donald Cassidy. 



128 




FIRST ROW; Margaret Boyle, Cecelia Elson. 
SECOND ROW: Gene Jagmin.Olin Ulrey, Sidney Fox. 



FIRST ROW: Michael Lower, Harry Burkhort. 
SECOND ROW: William Davis, Charles Latham, Willion 
Gardner, 




FIRST ROW: Albert Koenig, Jr., Thomas Pimbley. 

SECOND ROW: James Wise, Nancy Baker, John C. Wise. 



flKcl h _' » ihicrp M-ir, Cloren:e 0!t 

SECOND ROW: John Kocher, William L. Williams, Adolph 
Frehs. 




FIRST ROW: Ralph Graven, Jack Loney. 
SECOND- ROW: Jbhn Grimaldi, Robert London, Harry 
Reed.. 



FUST ROW. Naomi Teter, Marilyn Snyder 
SECOND ROW: Bjss Constontine, Charles Daum, Marjorie 
Melrose. 




129 



^ o o 




FIRST ROW: John Phillips, Charles Weber. 

SECOND ROW: Jack Moore, Ray Rice, William Loughrey. SECOND ROW: Bonnie Sue Kaiser, Virginia . Reed, Helen 

Hallock. ■ , 




ei ^ 



FIRST ROW; Nick Free, James Steele 

SECOND ROW: Chorles Sua, Everret Rigel, Kenneth Lange. 




FIRST ROW: Cloy Boker, John Wise. 
SECOND ROW: William Wilde, William Borlon, 
Hooper. 




FIRST ROW: John laurenson, Sarah Yingst. 
SECOND ROW: Walter Tisevich, Corol Johnson, Robert 
: Severns. 



FIRST ROW: Duane Budner, Irvmg Hohn. 
SECOND ROW: teonard Fogtesong, James Bulche 
Roth. 




130 




FIRST ROW: Befty Wilson, Harold Province, Allene Siegel. 
SECOND ROW: Kathleen Wolters, Helen Gergel, Rose- 
mary Acierno. 



FIRST ROW: Engene Schmiedl, John Shirillo, Irving Portman. 
SECOND ROW: Richard Fannin, Tom Conwell. 




FIRST ROW: Charlotte Caldwell, Elizabeth Stewart, Mar- 
garet Boone. 

SECOND ROW: Robert Bailey, Charles Hopkins, Carl 
Blackburn. 



FIRST ROW: Donald Zimmerlin, Martin Barrett, Leo Kot. 
SECOND ROW: William Kendall, Bernard Kilbride. 




131 




5 



TJLANNING activities for 1,700 second-year students proved 
-*- no easy task for sophomore class officers. However, class 
spirit showed itself on occasions such as the class agreement to 
co-sponsor the Popularity Ball with the freshmen and juniors. 

Between rehearsals for NTFC, University Theatre, and civic 
lodge plays, Dominic De Simio found time to devote to his 
duties as sophomore presidenr. His assistants in organizing the 
class included Carol Brown, vice-president; Mary Lou Masin, 
secretary; and John Wilhelm, treasurer. 

Among Smdent Council members who began the year as 
sophomores were Betty Jean Keck, Clarence Peoples, Philip 
Dempsey, William Shuttleworth, and John Gressard. 



The latter three shouldered the responsibilities and head- 
aches that accompanied selection of juniors and seniors for 
mention in "Who's Who Among Students in American Uni- 
versities and Colleges." 

Disproving the old theory that a write-in candidate "never 
has a chance," William Byrne tallied sufficient votes to elect 
him to the vice-presidency of Men's Union. 

In the spring quarter Robert WeymueUer began his duties 
as editor of the official alumni publication and campus repre- 
sentative of the Alumni Association. 

Although late in organizing, the sophomores still hoisted 
their flying colors in time to carry on the traditions of the class. 



^■^^PHOMORE 





Class Officers: John Wilhelm, treas- 
urer; Mary Lou Masin (seated), secre- 
tary; Carol Brown, vice-president. 

Dominic De Simio, president. 



132 




FIRST ROW: William Juhn, Edword L. Johnson, William Underwood, Myron Abood, Nino Venetta. 

SECOND ROW: Alfred Talirico, Mary Immler, Dorothy Pickett, Helen Belden, Cofherine Questel, Ann Bilanych, Ada Mae 

Hamilton. 
THIRD ROW: Glen Woodson, Martin Juhn, Don Kogey, David Huprick, Robert Fuehrer, Charles Hildebrecht, Mitchell McGuire, 

Andrew Peresta, Harry Bauschlinger, Mike Ancik. 




FIRST ROW: Upson Kyte, Chuck Dornbusch, Ed Hirzel, Richard Masin, George Holvey. 

SECOND ROW: Shirley Petermon, Dona Kyser, Jean Bittner, Mono Gween, Betty Moe Bertram, Solly Lou Schell, Dorothy Cross, 

Harriet Hollamby, 
THIRD ROW: Don Witten, Sue Cohen, Mary Lou Mosin, Eleanor Reilly, Corol Weltner, Carol Donley, Georgette Brusok, Betty 

Roessei, Biilie Mae Worden, Faye Kreider, Sheila Hirshberg, Marty Shingler, John Helleis. 



133 




FIRST ROW: Bob Cochran, Glen Woodson, Roy Brannon, Tom Martin, Bob Williams, Paul Snyder. 
SECOND ROW: Don Goldsmith, Florence Longe, Irene Docko, Dolores Clark, Marilyn Miller, Patricia McClister, Charles Kendig. 
THIRD ROW: Rudy Vannucci, Adam Rogolsky, Berwyn Guther, Edwin Atzenhofer, Daniel Griffin, Lee D. Miller, Ralph Stork, Bill 
Pilati, Nicholas Kropolinsky, James F. Huston. 




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FIRST ROW: Andrew J. Smith, Thane C. 
Haryu, Robert L. Evans, Al Ragonese, Lou 
Bumgartner, William Hoflman. 

SECOND ROW: Ruth Snyder, Beverly Ben- 
der, Betty Hull, Rosemary Schrader, Ann 
Bilanych, Jean Dvorak, Anne Ricciuti, Cuba 
Copeland. 

THIRD ROW: Nicholas Pisanelli, Harold 
Frazier, Ernest Murany, Bernard Schnabel, 
Fendell Johnson, Richard L. Dzurec, Lester 
R. Irwin, James Takacs, Bob Hampton. 



FIRST ROW: Jim Root, William J. Walker, 
Bob Weymueller, Gino Martinelli, Dick 
Abraham, George Borovicka. 

SECOND ROW: Jeanne Wolfe, Rosalia Fiori, 
Margaret Ann Black, Jean Louise Miller, 
Norma Harper, Judy Douglass, Joan Schill- 
ing, Helen Long. 

THIRD ROW: Pete Dohoda, Jack B. Esper- 
sen, William Kraley, Bernard Elewski, Bill 
Schaefer, Marion Courtney, Richard Logan, 
Robert Wissler, William M. Gudenus. 



FIRST ROW: Gilbert Green, Lewis Konstan, 

John Kulnitzky, Howard Beilhart, George 

Tabeling, Ernest Mauer. 
SECOND ROW: Don Wiese, Peg Buher, 

DoUie Patts, Jane Lais, Mary Baldridge, Al 

Serbanuta. 

THIRD ROW: Frank Romeo, Mike Varveris, 
Dale Hewitt, Ralph Brannon, George Caso, 
Martin Weissgarber, Dick Beachler, Frank 
Fetchet, Ted Gaynor, Stuart Barnes, Arthur 
Vance. 



134 



FIRST ROW: Ronald Walsh, Manuel Bar- 
reiro, Bob Ryan, Norman Flechler. 

SECOND ROW: Marty Lou Keisler, Dora Lee 
Kriechbaum, Joan Sehringer, Jean Shaffer, 
Paula Quinn, Jeanne D. Bolton, Beverly 
Stafford, Helen James. 

THIRD ROW: Paul E. McGough, Joseph 
Sherman, James G. Georgiadis, George C. 
Rybak, John F. Wilhelm, Al Cosier, Richard 
L. MuUer, Marty Pfinsgrafl, Albert C. Ro- 
haley, Ralph J. Maglione, Robert M. Rufner. 



FIRST ROW: M. D. Baughman, Robert Lorig, 
W. D. FuUerton, William E. Bigley, Edward 
A. Pelletier, Harry Pelley, Art Kambury. 

SECOND ROW: Sidney H. Mountcastle, Jen- 
nie Lou Keith, Mary Lou Fouts, Dorothy 
Mae Hackney, Pat Masky, Evelyn Burt, 
Loretta Nawrocki, Cecil Laraway, Jr. 

THIRD ROW: Al Fregly, George H. Ross, 
Robert E. Morelli, Frank A. Mikolich, Ed- 
win Olson, Al Larson, Richard L. Frame, 
Jonah Howells, Larry Stith, Ronald A. 
White. 



FIRST ROW: Charles Kelley, Clarence Peo- 
ples, Bob Wallace, Myron Gilbert, Ger- 
mane Swanson, Joe Messersmith, Richard 
Davis. 

SECOND ROW: Al Harmon, Hyman Wild- 
horn, Don Wilson, Betty Biller, John Schu- 
macher, Robert Hammer, Edward Barabas, 
Kenneth S. Hainai 

THIRD ROW: Kenneth Engel, Julius Kiss, 
Don Oehlke, Jerry Hennis, Bert Searls, 
James Marous, Ken Nielson, Richard En- 
right, Jim Crisp, Charles Wagner, Eugene 
Krent, Richard Gerber, Cecil R. Huff, Bob 
Linn, Joseph Hunt. 





P H O A/^Wl E S 



135 




Smooth functional lines of the Industrial 
Arts Building exemplify modern architecture. 




FIRST ROW: Lawrence La Viero, Charles 
Heflin, James T. Cherpas, Gordon Rice, 
Dale Ballinger, Tom Cadwell, William E. 
Baker. 

SECOND ROW: Carol McLaughlin, Ruth 
Khoenle, Joanne Mannino, Elsie Jakubjan- 
sky, Marilyn Patzwahl, Margaret Prentiss, 
Gloramae Witt, Nancy Heckman, Patricia 
Hess, Patt Bowden. 

THIRD ROW: Arnold Peterson, Albert Dal- 
torio, Robert Purgert, Gordon Canning, 
Robert F. Garnon, Raymond Biro, Robert S. 
King, Thomas White, Marion Del Vecchio, 
Joseph S. Miller, William Heintz, Robert 
Hughes, William McDermott. 



FIRST ROW: Glenn McFarland, Bill Pistner, 
Vincent Destro, Bill Christenson, George 
Hettinger, Harry Hanson, Jack R. Morrell, 
Paul R. Evans, Jr. 

SECOND ROW: Elaine Kaupinen, Penny Car- 
roll, Elaine White, Catherine Mulhearn, 
Arlyn Robinson, Fran Rigel, Anna Csuti, 
Jean Davidson, Frances Barr. 

THIRD ROW: Joe Abrutz, Frank Kromar, 
Paul Beavers, Joseph Ferro, Bob French, 
George Prusha, Bill Brown, Carl B. John- 
son, Edmund Wigley, John Dosa, Carl Di- 
mengo. Bob Sterk, Dean Becker, George 
Wilson. 



136 



FIRST ROW: James Ellis, William Byrn, 
Raymond Perez, Loreto George, Bill Gul- 
ish, Elliott Anderson, Howard Price. 

SECOND ROW: Mary Hoover, Ginny Horn, 
Ann Eshler, Lois Dorsey, Lois Porter, 
Helen Mitrovka, Jeannette Painter, Caroline 
Beard. 

THIRD ROW: Dwight Strayer, De Forest 
Winner, Bob Horn, John P. McMillen, 
Kenneth Lord, Edward Kissack, Charles 
Nairn, Paul A. Mathews, Bill Girgash, Don 
Persons. 



tl ^ 



FIRST ROW: William Love, Ernest Kneuer, 
Vincent Barchino, Henry White, Vernon 
Brown, Frederick Holp. 

SECOND ROW: Virginia Morar, Marian 
Cleaton, Carol Callahan, Marilyn Taylor, 
Annagene Kingsley, Gloria Ulch, Jeanette 
Waltz, Juanita Simmons. 

THIRD ROW: Harold L. Miller, James Kra- 
mer, Salvatore Gatti, Terry Atkinson, Mel- 
vin McClain, Ernest McCord, Jay Larsen, 
Joseph Erode, William Palmer, John Bonar, 
Elwood Finley. 



Billowy clouds frame the campus overhead 
in the intricate patterns ot a_summer sky. 





O R 



137 



s o 





FIRST ROW: Bernard Suhayda, Joe Fried- 
man, Artie Garner, Michael P. Clouse. 

SECOND ROW: Bob Eckelberry, Ralph Live- 
^ zey, Kirk Trimble, Roosevelt Buzzelli, Tom 
Allio, Richard Knabb, Paul Whiteman. 

THIRD ROW: William Todeff, Robert Doak, 
Dean Fletcher, Jay Tenner, Joe Calvaruso, 
John K. Dillan, Jule C. Salerni, Roger Baele, 
Michael Bibee, William Saltsman. 



FIRST ROW: Norman R. Rael, Thomas V. 
Di Cola, Lester Gamble, Dale Cochran, 
Merle Wiese. 

SECOND ROW: Marilyn Kotis, Gretchen Ra- 
der, Nancy King, Sallie Wagoner, Janice 
Galloway, Mae-Jeanne Rice, Pat Buckson. 

THIRD ROW: Pat Caliguire, Howard A. 
Simon, William Pochal, James Sitler, Harry 
GriflRths, Joe Caliguire. 



FIRST ROW: Andrew Jurgens, George White, 
Edward Lustig, Ralph Wuest. 

SECOND ROW: Beverly Post, Gloria Crone, 
Leona Lewis, Joann Cahill, Joanie Bollmey- 
er, Jerrie Gore. 

THIRD ROW: Margaret Panasuk, DoUy Ny- 
iry, James Boettler, Lee McMillen, Patrick 
Murphy, Edward J. Stanley Jr., Maxine 
Schoonover, Edna Morehouse. 



138 



FIRST ROW: Elwood Gibson, Dominick 
Badia, John L. Ovington, Vincent Bologna, 
Jr., Emil Mandalfino, Wilbert Bjorklund. 

SECOND ROW: Marjorie Ennes, Sue Lieber- 
mann, Shirley Edwards, Doris Merton, 
Margaret Jones, Dorothy Jewell, Verna 
Berger. 

THIRD ROW: Erwin Becker, Alvin Howdy- 
shell, Alexander Zetts, Wayne Rush, Arnold 
Cheyney, James Rice, C. R. Bammerlin. 



'^ '^ 9 JJ 



O 



FIRST ROW: Virgil Garner, Dick Haley, 
Clarence Lanzer, John Collins, Floyd Watts. 

SECOND ROW: Doris White, Rita Pompan, 
Lois Dolhar, Germaine Brugge, Paula Neu- 
mann, M. Joan Alten. 

THIRD ROW: Don Jacoby, John Lyon, Flor- 
ence Howard, Earl Wilson, Janice Flicking- 
er, Janet Steiger, William L. Bush. 



FIRST ROW: Tom Spencer, Bill Shuttle- 
worth, Russell Foldessy, Phil Bjorson, Jack 
Hague. 

SECOND ROW: Bob Wright, Robert Phil- 
lips, Lois Moats, Judy Evans, George Ertler, 
Bill Reiclarel. 

THIRD ROW: Marvin Ford, Joe Sharra, Jim 
Brown, Kathleen Waddell, Frank Abbott, 
Joseph Wheller, Tom McColloch, Erving 
Blackman. 





PHOMORES 



139 




5 1 



CCQORRY, we're all out of dinks," was a standard freshman- 

^week lament in September, 1947. 

Such evidence of the old "rah-rah" spirit returned to Kent 
State when the class of 1951 enrolled in the university last 
fall. Probably because most of these newcomers were younger 
than the freshmen veterans of the immediate post-war years, 
the new frosh clamored for dinks long after the last one had 
been sold. 

Again the vigorous spirit of the class revealed itself with 
the production of the all-frosh comedy, "My Sister Eileen," 
which introduced a host of new talent to the Kent State theater. 
Among the budding thespians were Jane Gates as the fragile 
Eileen; Jane King, the practical and witty Ruth; Paul Nasral- 



lah, the mean old landlord, and Edward Shelton, the fancy free 
newspaperman. 

Potential campus leaders stepped into the political limelight 
to revive waning politics when the final count revealed the 
election of Richard Rice, president; Lee Sproat, vice-president; 
Rita Hau, secretary; and Charles Fletcher, treasurer. 

Four newly-elected Student Council members included Ted 
Trask, Joseph McCabe, Nancy Reddrop, and Sally Koch. 

Par Patton, Don Esenwine, Robert Paskert, and Trask up- 
held frosh rights in Men's Union this year. 

From all indications, it looks as if the class of '51 will 
produce enough political tycoons to replace the upperclass 
"wheels" upon their graduation. 

Quarters were crowded for frosh coeds who moved 
into Moulton hall, now the only freshman dormitory 
on campus. The governing body of the dorm consisted 
of Sue Burns, president; Elizabeth Haggerty, vice- 
president; Nancy Pinkerton, secretary; and Gloria 
Donnelly, treasurer. 

Frosh couples danced to the music of Dale Stanford 
and his orchestra at the "Sweater Swagger" early in 
February under the soft lights in Moulton Music 
Room. The strictly stag affair marked the class' first 
social event of the winter quarter. 




140 




It wasn r Iool, ahcr the bct;inning of the year before the new campus citizens 
began to show up in the extra-curricular organizations. Freshmen soon found 
their places m the Radio Workshop, University Theatre, pubhcations, and every 
other phase of student effort. 



Each freshman was introduced to the medical facihcies of the University during 
the hrst week when his complete physical record was made up for the files. At 
least the blood test was one examination the students didn't have to cram for. 



The first few days of university life are always a bit dazzling for the new crop of freshmen, strange to the 
campus, the faces around them, and their new homes. Deserted Wills Gym offered quiec relief to this weary 
trio as they added the final touches to long days of registration procedure. 




141 





E S H M 



142 




Freshman week hazing kept the seol at Prenhce Gate shining . . . The first foot- 
ball train migration found hundreds of loyal rooters in the entering clas$ A 
feeling of doss unity become stronger os freshmen such os Carolyn Ma;twell and 
Colleen Gull turned out to pay does to Guenveur Harper and Dick Morrow 
President and Mrs. Bowman personally received the new mernbers of the student 
body at the annuo! reception ... A new crop of talent for the UT showed up for 
(he freshman production "My Sister Eileen/' with Jane Gates and Jane King in 
the leadmg roles. 






143 




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eit 



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Early each Saturday morning streams of coeds and young men, dressed for 
work in plaid wool shirts and blue jeans, make their way to respective sites of 
the fifteen Greek houses in Kent. Studies are forsaken for a scrub pail and paint 
brush, and the pledges dig in for a busy day. 

Focal point of campus fraternity activity is "The House," where "brothers" 
meet and work as they build up memories which will be recalled with sentiment 
and affection for years afterward. 

Just as fraternity houses can be transformed with a little paint, it doesn't 
take much to convert a campus coed into the belle of her sorority ball. For 
those who enjoy social functions, the fraternity is the thing; and long after 
graduation the house will remain the place where "It's so nice to come home to." 



F 



raternities 



145 



ALPHA GAMMA DELTA 




'-i-r.^VS^Y^t^"^^ 



220 North Lincoln St. 



MATILDA DAVIS PresidenJ 

ANNE DOMITER Vice-President 

GAY PROVO Secretary 

MARIAN ZAPKA Treasurer 



The third floor is called "Sinner's Sanctum," 
but it's the closest thing to heaven in the 
house! Mary, Inky, Bev, Evie, and Anne talk 
things over. 



Mother Dee gives her approval to Gay before 
she goes to the Burr formal. 




"pETURNING to the campus a week early in September, 
-*-*- members of Alpha Gamma Delta sorority pitched in im- 
mediately to renovate their house at the end of Lincoln street 
in time for the formal rush season. 

After a nightmare of long days of painting and sewing, the 
house was completely redecorated, with a cheerful new decor 
of dawn gray and pale green walls and woodwork. The Alpha 
Gamma Delta insignia of the twin roses was carried out in the 
pattern of the colorful window hangings. 

Scene of the installation of Alpha Gamma Delta as the 
Alpha chapter of the national group was the music room of 
Moulton Hall. Ceremonies took place December 6, when the 
local women joined the nation-wide sorority founded at Syra- 
cuse University in 1904. Installing officers, honorary members, 
and additional guests were entertained after the ceremonies at 
a special luncheon. The official President's Home at the east 
corner of the campus was opened for the affair. 

Rushing brought the Alpha Gams the regular quota of 
twenty freshman pledges. Since that time, eight more women 
have been pledged to membership, bringing the total sorority 
registration close to fifty persons. 

A "Palm Beach" theme was carried out at the annual pledge 
dance sponsored by Alpha Gamma Delta in Akron late in Feb- 
ruary. 

Bridge playing proved to be the favorite form of relaxation 
at the Alpha Gamma Delta house. Learners were well in evi- 
dence, and the process was aided by help from Housemother 
Dee. Several campus fraternities participated in open house 
bridge parties sponsored by the Alpha Gams, to carry on the 
traditional Sunday-evening get-togethers. 

Alpha Gamma Delta women were in evidence in most of 
the major campus organizations and activities. Two members 
were mentioned in the collegiate Who's Who, and one was 
an officer of Cardinal Key, women's national service honorary. 
Two more Alpha Gams were active in Zeta lota, honorary for 
outstanding women in business administration. 





FIRST ROW: Jackie Honninen, Beverly Post, - el Dis Loudon, Irene Tryon. 

SECOND ROW: Jane Claypoole, Marian Zapka, Matilda Davis, Anne Domiter, Patricia 

Schaefer. 
THIRD ROW: Wanda Harmon, Phyllis Province, Betty Mae Bertrom. Bonnie Jean Avant, 

Jeri Petzel, Anne Blockwelder. 




FIRST ROW: Margaret Sawyer, Goy Provo, Solly Schell, Mary Baldridge, Millicent 

Loudon, 
SECOND ROW: Kay Kotiszewski, Maryan Tiffin, Dorothea Helman, Eleanore Kneblewicz, 

Eleanor Tarchonin, Barbara Ashby. 
THIRD ROW: Evelyn Smith, Barbara Lee, Betty Yount, Pat Masky, Kathryn Wells, Jackie 

Averell, Ruth Frederking. 




147 



FIRST ROW: Betty Jones, Lois Ann Boll, Jean Davidson, Kathryn Panis. 

SECOND ROW: Gae Caldron, Shirley Lees, Irene Kelbough, Evelyn Reynolds, Marcella 

Elwood. 
THIRD ROW: Barbara Timmons, Jody Wade, Marilyn Brobst, Janet Copley, Alice Jilek, 

Jeanne Wolfe. 



ALPHA OMEGA 




f(ri^'imp^-!m^^xismimm;:^i^i^^:*f:- 



309 University Dr. 



KATHLEEN VAUGHAN President 

DONA MAY BURKHARDT ..Vice-President 

EILEEN SMITH Secretary 

BETTY HESS Treasurer 



^^. 



Telephone calls are of prime importance in 
any coed's life, and Laura Jane is the lucky 
gal. Dona Mae and Dee look on anxiously. 



Marty Riley and Betty Hess love to listen to 

mystery stories before they retire. Mavbe they 
find them "relaxing'" . . . 



Seems Lydia can't have any privacy while writ- 
ing to her one and only. 




/^NE of the few remaining local sororities on campus is 
^-^ Alpha Omega, which maintains its green and white home 
on University Drive. Alpha Omega women continued this 
year to take part in many campus activities, and the sorority 
was represented in the leading honoraries. 

Among the biggest events on the social calendar is the All- 
Greek formal, presented annually by the AO's for members 
of the entire fraternity-sorority group at Kent State. Akron's 
East Market Gardens was the scene of this year's successful 
dance, highlighted by presentation of Alpha Omega pledges 
to the fraternity circle. 

After an extensively promoted campaign, Mabel Davey was 
elected Miss Kent State of 1948. Clothed in royal velvet and 
ermine, she was presented at the traditional Top Hop formal. 

Other queenships also have come in overwhelming numbers 
to the AO's this year, including the Homecoming, Chestnut 
Burr and Kappa Sigma Chi honors. The last award has been 
made to members of Alpha Omega for three consecutive years, 
making it possible for the group to keep possession of the 
sweetheart trophy. 

Honors in another field came to Alpha Omega at last 
spring's Campus Day festival. An acquarium with human 
mermaids drew the award for the most original float entered 
by sorority groups in the parade. 

An exciting day in the AO house is the time when mem- 
bers of the sorority exchange pledges with their brother fra- 
ternity. Delta Phi Sigma. Delt pledges answer the beckoning 
calls of AO actives and Alpha Omega pledges do the same 
at the Delt house — both groups going through a rigorous 
routine of cleaning, painting, and scrubbing. 

AO coeds also kept in trim this winter by participating in 
the Women's Athletic Association tournaments. They tied 
for the winning cup. 

Among less vigorous activities of Alpha Omega are the 
semi-annual parties honoring the sorority housemother, pa- 
trons and patronesses. These events take place at Christmas 
time and during the spring quartet. 





FIRST ROW: Jessica Perry, Alice Sherman, Lois Ann Heller, Alberta Sturr!, Becky Culley. 
SECOND ROW: Pat Maglione, Joanne Ackerman, Eleanor Tomosik, Jackie Duke, Martha 

Riley. 
THIRD ROW: Cliorlene Arnold, Adele Halter, Dorothy Marburger, Mary Catherine 

Scullion, Dorothy Romanovich, Elien Hobart. 




FIRST ROW. Nancy Heiks, Carolyn Stofcho, Marilyn Morse, Pat Wolcott, Marilyn Had- 

field. 
SECOND ROW: Dona May Burkhardt, Helen Kolk, Kathleen Vaughan, Eileen Smith, Betty 

Hess. 
THIRD ROW: Irene Brodbeck, Mary Helen Pearse, Lydia Mihok, Phoebe Steiner, Dona 

Moe Burkhardt, Marilyn Marsha. 




149 



FIRST ROW: Delores Bashline, Mary Alice Hiller, Jeanne Cook, Mary Michel, Janet Weimer 
SECOND ROW: Jean Milford, Eleanore Kolk, Betty Jean Keck, Mabel Dovey, Betty 

Rowlen. 
THIRD ROW: Barbara Ewell, Romelda Kolk, Peg Johnson, Laura Wendelken, Shirley 

Baker, Dorothy Davey. 



ALPHA XI DELTA 




Formerly Gamma Sigma Phi 
516 East Summit St. 



ISLA SCHN AUFFER President 

NITA WENDLING Vice-President 

DORIS HEUPEL Secretary 

BONNIE KAISER Treasurer 



Time for bed and always time to talk over 
the "beaux." Are you eavesdropping. Georgia? 



Bridge seems lo be "the" game everywhere, 
holdmg everyone's interest but Carol's. 



DICK TRACY, Little Orphan Annie, Charles Charles, Tar- 
zan and "Vitamin" Flinthart came to life in last year's 
Pork Barrell long enough for members of Alpha Xi Delta 
sorority to walk off with the trophy and "bring home the 
bacon." 

August 17 local Gamma Sigma Phi was pledged to Alpha 
Xi Delta, and November 22 the coeds were formally installed 
as Beta Tau chapter of the national sorority, founded in 1893 
at Lombard College. 

Each year varsity football players choose their own queen, 
and at the close of the 1947-48 season Doris Heupel reigned 
as Pigskin Prom Queen at the dance honoring her and the 
grid team. 

Alpha Xi's also won the contest in honor of Homecoming 
by gaily decorating their house at Summit and Lincoln streets 
with a "Feudin' and Fightin' " theme. Judges chose their work 
as the best in the sorority division, designed to portray the 
KSU-Kalamazoo fracas. 

No matter what time of day visitors drop in at the Alpha 
Xi Delta house, they find tables of bridge well-filled. Everyone 
seems to know how to play, and "proof of the pudding" is 
the coeds' winning of the bridge tournament sponsored by 
Pan-Hellenic council. 

Not all Alpha Xi entertainment is impromptu, however. 
Immediately after the rushing season, the social merry-go- 
round got under way with a Christmas party for patronesses 
and alumnae. Next came the annual winter formal in Jan- 
uary, which had to be postponed a week when Old Man Win- 
ter went to work, making it impossible to reach the country 
club. But the Alpha Xi's weren't discouraged: the following 
week they held the dance which proved to be one of the high- 
light events of the year. 

The social year ended for Alpha Xi Delta women and 
alumnae with a formal spring dinner dance at the Tudor Arms 
Hotel, Cleveland. 

In addition to their social activities, Alpha Xi's found time 
to participate in three honorary groups, as well as Student 
Council, the Kent Stater, Women's League, and Allocations 
Committee. 




FIRST ROW; Shirley Marks, Alberta Gehring, Georgio Kennedy. 
SECOND ROW: Nito Wendling, Bonnie Kaiser, Isia SchnaufFer, Doris Heupel. 
THIRD ROW: Elsie Jakubjansky, Mix Grodolph, Ethelyn Scott Ryder, Margaret Scullion, 
Noncy Baker, 




FIRST ROW: Nancy Reddrop, Lillian Torgler, Marian Torgler, Betty Farrar. 
SECOND ROW: Marcelline Zagg, Marttia Cholfant, Charlene Jones, Phyllis Weager. 
THIRD ROW: Jeanne Roe Zesiger, Martha Bissler, Morionne Bowden, Betty Reddrop, 
Potricia Bowden. 




151 



FIRST ROW: Satly Koch, Phyllis Horn, Mory Lou Ebinger, Carol Stiienbouer. 

SECOND ROW: Phyllis Robbins, Rose Ann Mason, Mary Lou Johnson, Janice Edgerton. 

THIRD ROW: Dora Ruckel, Joan Huffman, Virginia Yeadon, Corol Taylor, Janet Sonow. 



BETA GAMMA 




21} University Dr. 



RUTH HORBALY President 

CONNIE NORRIS Vice-President 

KATIE POTH Secretary 

BEVERLY LEWIS Treasurer 






Just like home when you can raid the ice box! 
That sandwich tastes mighty good to Nan. 



Pat reminisces as the gang looks on. It must be 
one of those songs that makes a coed senti- 
mental. 



An evening at "Ye Olde Sorority House" gets 
the girls together for a good time. 



.r<^ 






"DETA GAMMA sorority fired the opening gun on Kent 
-*-^ State social life this year with their sponsorship of the 
"Witches' Cauldron" at Halloween time. As the first all-Uni- 
versity dance, the affair served to introduce new students to 
University social routines and provided a brief lull from the 
first four weeks of hard school work. 

Other dances also were on the Beta Gamma agenda for the 
year. Actives were guests at the fall "Lollipop Hop," presented 
by Beta Gam pledges to symbolize their infancy as sorority 
members. Dancers dressed in children's outfits which added to 
the hilarity of the strictly informal party. 

The mood was exactly opposite for the sorority's annual 
spring supper dance, held at the University Club in Akron. 
Here lovely decorations, soft music and dim lights added ro- 
mance to the atmosphere for the "Moonlight Mood" formal. 

Another big time for every Beta Gamma member was last 
spring's Campus Day, when Mavis Lemmons was selected 
from a large court to preside as Queen of the May. She was 
honored at an outdoor ceremony on the front campus and 
again at the dance that evening. 

The same day, two Beta Gamma coeds were attendants to 
the Rowboat Regatta Queen at festivities on the river in the 
morning. The sorority also received honorable mention for 
their entry in the Campus Day parade. 

As a reflection of their delight at being "just kids" for the 
"Lollipop Hop," Beta Gammas worked full-time to insure 
happiness for children who are ill. Throughout the year mem- 
bers of the sorority collected and repaired toys, and their 
work was rewarded when they presented the bulging treasure 
chest of delightful playthings to youngsters in the children's 
ward of Robinson Memorial Hospital, in Ravenna. 

Week-ends at the Beta Gamma house were spent remodel- 
ing the sorority home on University Drive; but things were 
always spick and span for Sunday evening suppers, when 
various fraternities were guests. 

Beta Gamma coeds had a chance to see their members in 
nvo campus theatricals — "My Sister Eileen" and NTFC 





FIRST ROW: Margaret Zilla, Nancy Heckmcn, Alice Romanachuck. 

SECOND ROW: Mary Jane Clerk, Nan-ty Pence, Dorothy Paul, Gertrude Willioms. 

THIRD ROW: Marilyn Taylor, Marge Ennis, Kathryn Poth, Marion Harsley, Carol Weltner. 




FIRST ROW: Jane King, Beverly lewis, Jo Douglas, Connie Morris. 

SECOND ROW: Alice Lombard, Ruth Horbaly, Ann Antypas, Nancy Bailey, Jean Keller. 
THIRD ROW: Chorlene Morelond, Nancy Lombird, Jean Tedrick, Jane Wrentmore, Pat 
Godfrey. 




153 



FIRST ROW: Treva Davis, Bette Shepherd, Carol Moeller, 
SECOND ROW: Pat Addcms, Winifred Jones, Mavis Lemmons, Judy Douglas. 
THIRD ROW: Carol Callahan, Betty Childress, Miriam Mi'^hell, Kathleen Cvengros, Jane 
Jenkins, 



CHI OMEGA 




Formerly Kappa Lambda 



CHRISTINE VOGT President 

JEAN STONESTREET Vice-President 

BETTY HERRMANN Secretary 

EILEEN YOUNG Treasurer 




That cash register's only a prop, but a few 
Chi Omegas get a scare as a coke chaser. Meet- 
ing in the Jay-Teen has its advantages after all. 



Marge studiously ignores the music and empty 
grape juice bottles as she tries to come out 
ahead. There's nothing like having enough 
seats to go 'round, either. 



Nope, this isn't Joe's Pool room. Just an 
after-meeting fun session complete with ping 
pong and sore muscles. 



T AST SPRING the air buzzed with talk of "nationals" com- 



1^ 



ing to the campus, but nothing was certain. While rumors 



still were flying among the local fraternities, Kappa Lambda, 
youngest local at the time, was the first to step out and be 
pledged to a national social sorority. They chose Chi 
Omega, founded at the University of Arkansas in 1895. 

June 7 members were installed formally as the Lambda 
Delta chapter of Chi Omega. To the Kent State coeds went 
the honor of being the one hundredth chapter on the Chi 
Omega roU, as weU as the first national on campus. 

When fall rushing season opened, the Chi O's were handi- 
capped without a house, but, to prove that the age of chivalry 
was not dead. Phi Beta Phi's graciously offered the use of their 
home. Fourteen women were pledged during the autumn sea- 
son. 

Meetings were reserved for business, but after each session 
Chi Omegas found time for dancing, since they usually met 
in the Jay-Teen downtown. Another place they called home 
was the Moulton Hall music room, the site of most of the 
special sorority celebrations. 

When the "new look" in women's dress caused a furore at 
Kent, as everywhere else, the K-Vets revolted against long 
hemlines by measuring every coed's skirt and rewarding the 
wearer of the garment they considered the exact proper style. 
A Chi Omega member was chosen "Miss Right Length" in the 
novel competition. 

Skirts gave way to blue jeans and plaid shirts for one of the 
biggest jobs at Kent State — decorating Wills gym for dances. 
Chi Omegas took the lead in this project, as well as in helping 
to sell tickets for the dances and promoting sales of student 
directories. 

One of Chi Omega's national traditions calls for their 
pledge group to entertain all other pledges on campus. This 
was done in January with an informal party, highlighted by a 
skit about "A Typical Pledge's Day." 

Fun also gives way to seriousness for Chi O's, who offer an- 
nually a trophy for outstanding work in the field of sociology. 
First KSU award was made this spring. 




155 




FIRST ROW: Margaret Anne Martin, mary lou Smith, Ruth Hettinger, June James, Alice 

Jones. 
SECOND ROW: Helen Gorrison, Billie Mae Worden, Aurelia Adams, Barbara Henry, 

Mary Lou Masin. 
THIRD ROW: Nancy King, Joan Luthy, Ann Gifford, Peg Pinkerton, Carol Peterson. 




FIRST ROW: Lucky Hyman, Borbara Clark, Down Kerkhof, Dora Michael, Carol Klein. 
SECOND ROW: Suzanne Bums, Hildegarde Boehm, Maxine Schoonover, Phyllis Persons, 

Shirley Woodbridge. 
THIRD ROW; Carol Mahan, Marion Cleaton, Elizabeth Robinson, Corol Brown, Nancy 

Pinkerton, 




FIRST ROW: Gretchen Rader, Joanne Harvey, Marian Lower, Barbara Thomos, Madelyn 

Goddard. 
SECOND ROW; Eileen Young, Jean Stonestreet, Christine Vogt, Betty Herrmann, Janet 

Crawford. 
THIRD ROW: Gwen Clough. Sue Yocum. Morion Yearkey, Virginia Radu, Carol Orlikowski. 



DELTA GAMMA 




Formerly Sigma Sigma Sigma 
and Sigma Delta Sigma 

548 East Summit St. 



VIRGINIA BLOCK President 

MARY JANE BLACKWELL. . .Vice-President 

PATRICIA BUCKSON Secretary 

SHIRLEY WIRTH Treasurer 







'*^ 


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t^i-ik.«-il' 










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Mrs. Chestnut entertains some of the girls in 
her room. Whatever she has to say, it must be 
very interesting. 



Jean gives out with a tune — but who's hold- 
ing Jean's and Grayce's attention? 



The "anchor" girls spend a pleasant evening 
at home working on the books and looking 
through the lively sorority scrapbook. 



i m 



TTROM their big Summit street house atop the highest hill 
-*- in the county, Delta Gamma sorority members spread their 
wings again this year to enter enthusiastically into campus so- 
cial and intellectual activities. 

Formal installation of the Gamma Epsilon chapter of Delta 
Gamma took place December 6. A reception the next day in 
Moulton Hall completed the celebration. Original chapter of 
Delta Gamma was founded at Lewis School in 1873. 

Members of Delta Gamma found their way into Student 
Council and the annual collegiate Who's Who. First Rowboat 
Regatta queen was a Delta Gamma who reigned at the river 
race while dressed in white shorts, an angora sweater, and 
white sailor hat. 

In February, actives gave a special dance at Twin Lakes 
for the pledge chapter. Each pledge was presented individual- 
ly as she took her place in the huge anchor formation, which 
completed the impressive ceremony. 

The Delta Gammas also entertained their brother fraternity. 
Gamma Tau Delta, at a house party during the winter quarter. 

Another major social event at the Delta Gamma house was 
the annual Founders Day banquet, when the house was deco- 
rated with cream colored roses and bronze, pink and blue rib- 
bons. After the opening reception, members of the Eta Chapter 
from Akron joined Kent State Coeds in a dinner at the 
Robinhood. Alumnae were also guests at the affair, which took 
place March 13. 

Not all social affairs concern only members of the sorority, 
however. Twenty-seven underprivileged children were enter- 
tained by coeds of Delta Gamma at a special Christmas party. 

The coeds themselves got such a treat from watching the 
delighted children that they immediately set to work planning 
a similar fun-fest. Traditional gifts and Yule carols gave way 
to special heart-shaped presents and game songs for a Valentine 
party, when twenty-five more underprivileged youngsters were 
treated as royal guests. 





FIRST ROW: Ruth Hoehn, Mary Hoover, Nadlne Phillips, Janice Cover. 

SECOND ROW: Betty Jean Bartlow, Marilyn Jones, Shirley Wirth, Virginia Block, Mary 

Jane Blackwell, Jeanne Carey. 
THIRD ROW: Polly Bailey, Dolores Kne, Martha Potchen, Mary Lou Holland, Eleano' 

Brace, Olive Holmes. 




FIRST ROW: Nancy Seffing, Camilla Caine, Dorothy Kline, Roberta Wedewen. 
SECOND ROW: Becky Taylor, Janet Bcattie, Annagene Kingsley, June Wilder, Noncy 

Swjgart, Mary West. 
THIRD ROW: Mildred Lowe, Ruth Ann Gallagher, Geraldine Keller, Doris Bronco, Groycia 

Mays, Sallie Wheeler. 




157 



FIRST ROW: Patricia Buckson, Gerry Tarmichoel, Virginia Horn, Morjorie Pormeiee. 
SECOND ROW: Janice Galloway, Shelmir Ritchie, Patricia Sutton, Mary lou Carson, Joan 

Waterhouse, Carol Keidel. 
THIRD ROW: Barbara Berg, Judy Williams, Anne Baldwin, Jean Goncher, Ethel Johnson, 

Saflie Wagoner. 



DELTA ZETA 




Formerly Gtimnin lola 

Meeting at 123 Linden Rd. 



MARILYN BRUST President 

ANGEUNE SCOURCOS Vice-President 

MARTHA WILBER Secretary 

KAY PRICHARD Treasurer 



Snack time before bed is a familiar scene 
everywhere. Marty drops in just before closing 
hour. 



Angie seems to be quite happy serving tea to 
the girls. Being "in the know" about this 
branch of etiquette is an asset to all coeds. 




TT ENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S newest local sorority, Gam- 
-'-^ ma Iota, made its appearance on the campus during the 
formal fall rush season. It wasn't long until they were pledged 
to Delta Zeta, national social group founded in 1902 at Miami 
University. National pledging ceremonies took place Decem- 
ber 19. 

Delta Zeta launched itself vigorously during the informal 
rush period, and added eighteen more women to their ranks, 
making the total number thirty-five. 

Without a house or other material assets, the Delta Zetas 
set out enthusiastically to establish themselves on campus. 
They were the first group to buy a seat in the proposed Me- 
morial Stadium. Sorority members also helped support the 
stadium fund by selling 409 student directories. Published by 
Blue Key honorary, the directory was sold to students, with 
all proceeds going to the drive. Delta Zeta won the first di- 
rectory trophy for its effort. 

During their first year, the social calendar of the Delta 
Zetas included a buffet supper at the home of one member in 
Stow. Persons attending included the original seventeen 
members. 

Almost a dozen foreign accents marked the outdoor picnic 
supper given by the coeds for Kent State students from other 
lands. Serving all-American hot dogs, coke and potato salad, 
the women offered a material lesson illustrating the good- 
neighbor policy. 

After the excitement of installation, rushing and final exami- 
nations, the Delta Zeta coeds ended their successful year with 
a spring formal. "Come to the Mardi Gras" was the theme of 
the dance, carried out in soft music and lighting effects. 

Several members of the sorority worked together outside 
of the group as well as within. Three coeds were volunteer 
counselors to freshmen smdents. Other outstanding members 
included the first post-war woman business manager of the 
Kent Stater and the director of sound effects for the theater 
and radio groups. 





FIRST ROW: Thelma Waddell, Joan Setuinger, Dora Lee Kriechbogm, Shirley Drake, 
Evelyn Burt, Borbara Brower. 




FIRST ROW: Martha Keisler, Martha Wilber. 

SECOND ROW: Kafhryn Prichard, Lillion Bowser, Marilyn Brust, Angeline Scourcos, Eliza- 
beth Roup. 




159 



FIRST ROW: Constance Colucct, Margaret Fitzgerold, Julio Ross, Jane Kile Byrn^ Ruth 
Raub, lona Chombers. 



GAMMA PHI BETA 




^rmerly Theta Sigma Upsilon 
and Theta Sigma Tau 

520 South Lincoln St. 



BETTY HOY President 

DOTTY CLEVENGER Vice-President 

JEAN SHAFFER Secretary 

ELIZABETH STEVE Treasurer 



Last year's "May Day" song fest winners prac- 
tice to capture the cup again this spring. 



Linda sticks to her studies while the girls play 
solitaire. It takes four to play this one out. 



A nice fire gives one that "glowing" feeling. 
VC'hen it's about four below that would be 
ummm — good! ' ' 



GOOD singing and athletic skill are the marks of Gamma 
Phi Beta sorority, second national social group on the 
Kent State campus. The Beta Zeta chapter, fifty-fourth mem- 
ber of the national, was formally installed October 25 at a 
ceremony in Moulton Hall, performed by chapter members of 
Ohio Wesleyan University. Gamma Phi Beta was founded at 
Syracuse University in 1874. 

Two song festivals were won by coeds of the sorority dur- 
ing the spring term last year. A warm-up trophy was theirs 
as the result of the Kappa Mu Kappa song contest at the 
fraternity's Jubilee Dance. But the real honor for music 
prowess came on Campus Night, as the singers offered the 
enchanting "Begin the Beguine" from the steps of MerriU 
HaU. 

Also on the Gamma Phi Beta trophy shelf are two athletic 
awards gained this year. The group won the matches in soccer 
and volleyball after beating other sorority and women's dor- 
mitory teams. 

More visible results came from the physical energy spent 
in remodeling the sorority house. After a complete redecorat- 
ing job, the house on South Lincoln Street was ready for its 
national guests. 

Highlights of the winter quarter included the annual pledge 
dance, held at the Aurora Country Club. Also during that term 
was the tea presented for pledges of other sororities as a tra- 
ditional gesture of friendship. 

Gamma Phi Beta did its share in supporting plans for the 
forthcoming Memorial Stadium. In conjunction with Alpha 
Phi Beta fraternity, the coeds gave a dance during the spring 
term, donating the entire collection to the drive. 

Many outstanding women were members of the sorority, 
from the president right down the line. Several coeds were 
in Cardinal Key honorary, four women were on the executive 
board of the Women's Athletic Association, and several more 
were officers of the Health and Physical Education Club. Other 
groups to which Gamma Phi Beta members belonged included 
the science honorary, theater and radio clubs, business admin- 
istration honorary, and Women's League. 





FIRST ROW: Linda Ross, Eloise Stockman, Teddy Scott, Jean Greer. 

SECOND ROW: Mary Jane Averill, Grace Tesmer, Ingrid Ullman, Pat Sellers, Mary Du- 
laney. 

THIRD ROW: Mary Marsh, June Ford, Nancy Snodgross, lee Baumon, Nancy Warnock. 




FIRST ROW: Pat Kilrain, Marilyn Orr, Ruth Mason, June Maxwell. 

SECOND ROW; Eileen Kneifel, Margaret Breath, Laverne Honsberger, Dana Danford, 

Jean Shaffer. 
THIRD ROW: Becky Caldwell, Janice Lone, Delores Carroll, Peggy Buher, Mary Beth 

Ikerman, Shirley Robinson. 




161 



FIRST ROW: Betty Rutherford, Elizabeth Steve, Laverne Santa, Dorothy Sohramm. 
SECOND ROW: Annamary Acerra. Harriette Russell, Betty Hoy, Dorothy Clevenger, 

Lois Allyn. 
THIRD ROW: Ruth Baker, Alice Jean Watson, Jean Fulweber, Charlotte Thomas, Jean 

Melick. 




^j 



m ^^^ 






First Row: Dawn Kerhof, Janet Crawford. Matilda Davis. SECOND Row: Ruth Horbaly. Millicent Loudon, Marilyn Brust, Elizabeth Raup. THIRD ROW: 
Patchen, Elizabeth Hoy, Isia Schnauffer, Alice Jean Watson, Peggy Pinkerton, Agnes Hart, Kathleen Vaughan. 



UNDER the guidance of the National Panhellenic Con- 
ference, the Kent State University Panhellenic Council 
was founded October 30 to replace the local group with the 
same name. 

Composed of twenty-seven members, the group includes 
one senior, one junior and one alumna from each sorority 
on campus. Under the Council's guidance formal and informal 
rushing take place. The group works closely with the office 
of the Dean of Women in planning this event each term. 

This year Panhellenic sponsored a benefit bridge to raise 
money for support of a war orphan. The central group also 
gives a bridge tournament for sorority entrants and pro- 
motes good scholarship by offering a trophy to the sorority 
with the highest average grade for all its members. 






Am 






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ELLENIC COUNC 




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.-< 



First Row: Rudy Ruzich, Frank Leonard, Jim Rhoades, Dana Leeuett, Bob Ginther. SECOND Row: Alfred Rubin, Russell Hawsman, Julian Kofsl, Jack Hurowitz, Wallace 
Krivoy, Don E, Smith, Don Renwand. Randy Newhouse, Robert Wentz, 









. ^^c^a^-'-fipif'^^ 



AEr^r AAr, 







"PERFECT coordination is as necessary to the welfare of 
-'- fraternity organizations on a college campus as it is to the 
success of an army. 

That is why the president and one other member of each 
fraternity at Kent State meet on alternate Wednesdays in meet- 
ings of Inter-Fraterniry Council. 

Aim of the group is to promote intellectual, social, and cul- 
tural life, as well as loyalty to the University and its traditions. 
The council also controls rushing and pledging, serving as a 
coordinating body between the campus fraternities and the 
administration. 

Efforts of the council during the last year have been par- 
ticularly important as, with the aid of Dean of Men Raymond 
Manchester and University President George Bowman, the 
group opened the way for national fraternities. 




INTER-FRATERNITY COUNC 



HA EPSILON 



jaam 



^X^ 



::^_-.. 



213 Lake Street 



JULIAN KOFSKY President 

ED WEISSFELD Vice-President 

JOSEPH FRIEDMAN Secretary 

MARVIN RUBIN Treasurer 



Just before finals finds the boys "knee-deep" 
in studies. Here Marty explaias a problem 
to one of the twins. 



Everyone was quite interested in Sid's con- 
versation on the phone. What — or who — 
could be that important? 




The AE's always enjoy the impromptu music 
supplied by Phil and Shelly, but "Jose" pre- 
fers more professional music. 



' ^^-^^ 



A LPHA EPSILON was still in its infanq' during 1947-48, 
■^ -^ but signs of rapidly increasing vigor indicated at the 
outset of the year that AE was beginning to mature even 
before its second birthday. 

And it wasn't long before those omens began coming true. 
After having been tied together only by the bonds of friend- 
ship for many months, the fraternity succeeded in renting a 
house in September. 

From that day forward, there was little doubt that Alpha 
EpsUon was here to stay. That first month of school the fra- 
ternity was a small, well-knit group of sixteen men. Too small, 
indeed, to compete successfully in intramurals; but that didn't 
deter the AE's, who kept building for the future. 

October saw thirteen men pledge the fraternity, including a 
varsity footballer and the producer of "No Time for Classes." 
Already in the group were men prominent in journalism, 
radio, debate, and almost every other department. 

Two dinners, the first in October and the second in No- 
vember, honored new members as they became pledges and 
actives of Alpha Epsilon. 

Dreamy music and dim lights in the beautiful ballroom of a 
leading hotel in Cleveland were the outstanding features of a 
highly successful formal dinner dance shortly before the end 
of the fall term. 

After several wartime years during which the junior classes 
did litde more than exist, an Alpha Epsilon member took over 
the reigns and guided the organization back to a place of im- 
portance in campus affairs. He also helped establish a campus 
chapter of the American Veteran's Committee. 

Outstanding originality which marked the sets of "No Time 
for Classes" was also largely the brainstorm of an AE man, 
art director of the musical show as well as a member of the 
Chestnut Burr art staff. 

In its brief life Alpha Epsilon has earned its position among 
the family of Kent State fraternities, and is meeting the al- 
ready-established standards of educational and social activity. 





FIRST ROW: Leonard Taylor, Murroy Pearlman, Harvey Israel. 

SECOND ROW: Ronald Cohen, Irving Portman, Allen Greenberg, Sidney Rosenthal. 

THIRD ROW: Herbert Goldberg, Barry Lazarus, Victor Weissfeld. 




FIRST ROW: Dr. William Meinke, Julian Kofsky, William Weiskopf. 

SECOND ROW: Joseph Friedman, Alfred Rubin, Marvin Rubin, Martin Leimon. 

THIRD ROW: W. Ernest Translateur, Phillip Brustein, Edward Weissfeld. 




165 



FIRST ROW: Kenneth Goldstein, Daniel Miller, Frank Calvary. 
SECOND ROW: Manuel Peretz, Richard Lyons, Robert Fox, Ben Appel. 
THIRD ROW: Charles V/eiss, Myron Gilbert, Burton Briefmon. 





Boys must be boys, as usual, and a few Phi 
Betas take time out for some rough-house. 
Watch that ear, fellow! Those things come 
loose, you know. 



Olsen and Johnson had nothing on the local 
version. "Kentzapoppin." It's things like this 
that make Homecoming a success. 



The living room seems big until everyone 
tries to invade it. Bill manages to concentrate 
on the game, even while "everyone wants to 
get into the act." 



166 



TJAYING rent year after year isn't the best business policy 
■*- in the world, a group of returning veterans quickly realized. 
Besides, they thought, to be most effective a fraternity should 
own its own house. 

Arriving at this decision, the determined group of Alpha 
Phi Beta men set about procuring funds to swing a purchase. 
They individually took advantage of veteran loan opportunities 
to borrow money which they in turn loaned to the fraternity. 

That accomplished. Beta set out to find a suitable home, and 
located the attractive house at 227 E. College Avenue. Ex- 
penditure of some cash and a lot of energy put the new home 
into tiptop shape, and 17 members of the fraternity now make 
it their Kent residence. 

Any Beta, though he realizes the difficulties of such a ven- 
ture, is convinced that it has been well worth the effort, for the 
house provides the site for the meetings, bull sessions, and 
social affairs which serve as an oudet for their enthusiasm. 

That vitality is apparent not only within the fraternity, but 
also in its relations toward the entire university community. 

When plans were announced for the University Memorial 
Stadium drive, the Betas were quick to offer aid. Within a 
matter of days they had announced their intention to give the 
drive every assistance. Shortly afterwards they combined with 
Gamma Phi Beta sorority to announce that they would co- 
sponsor an all-university dance, with all profits directed to the 
stadium fund. 

This action was not the first indication of the fraternity's 
interest in the university. For a number of years Alpha Phi 
Beta has presented the annual Manhood Key, awarded to the 
outstanding male graduate on the basis of scholarship, leader- 
ship, character, and courage. These, the Betas feel, are the 
things which make a fuU university life. 





FIRST ROW: Bob Cole, Ronald Thomas, Bill Thomas, Eugene Krent. 
SECOND ROW: Bill Mack, Dana Leggett, Edward Grendel, John Dan, Steve Byrnes. 
THIRD ROW: Lloyd Thomas, Norman Thompson, John Lapunka, Don E. Smith, Stan Grendel, 
John Beles, Bob Reash. 




FIRST ROW: Joel Henry, Thomas Barrett, Bernard Petit, Edward Wojack. 

SECOND ROW: John Barrett, Charles Reickwein, George Heaslip, Paul Weitzel, Louis 

Loutizar. 
THIRD ROW: Martin Danilo, Frank Wallis, George Rybok, Roland Patzer, Dick Folley, 

Jack Barry, Jim Powers. 




167 



FIRST ROW: Harry Wise, Fred Hawley, George Case, Frank DePasquale. 
SECOND ROW: George Ebel, Frank Kromar, John Kulnitzky, Ervin Mathews. 
THIRD ROW: William Cooke, Glenn Fuller, Robert Hart, John Bandi, Paul Peiper, Al- 
Lumsden. 



I SIGMA 



m 




262 Columbus St. 



BOB WENTZ President 

BOB BEACHY Vice-President 

FRANK SPECHALSKE Secretary 

CHARLES PETTY Treasurer 




Varsity K men of the "athletic fraternity" re- 
hash one of the year's big games as they go 
through an old Burr. 



Mabel slips one "under the counter" in the 
new recreation room which is the pride of 
the Delis. 



Delt housemother, Mrs. Blanche Green, takes 
time out with her boys to go over their fa- 
vorite campus songs. 



168 



SIDELINE markers are usually difficult to see on Rockwell 
field, but on this particular fall evening, what with mud 
and the trample of hundreds of feet, no one was quite certain 
where they were. A large crowd of students craned their necks 
in an effort to be "in on the kill" and the markers were swal- 
lowed up in the tide. 

It was a tough battle. First one team of mud-smeared grid- 
der threatened and then the other, with neither team able to 
fight the mire effectively enough to punch through for a 
touchdown. Then, with seconds to go, a successful pass gave 
Delta Phi Sigma six points and another in its long string of 
athletic conquests. 

This was the case in intramurals, but the situation was the 
same in any varsity sport on the campus. Somewhere, on the 
field, standing on the sidelines waiting the go-ahead signal, or 
standing guard over water bucket and bandages, there was 
certain to be a Delt. 

"The Athletic Fraternity" — A good natured epithet that's 
long been applied to Delta Phi Sigma; a nickname of which 
they are quite proud, because it has been earned over a long 
period of years. 

In case anyone might suggest that athletes, according to tra- 
dition, are strong on brawn and short on brains, the Delts can 
prove otherwise. The president of the group served as a mem- 
ber of student council, the Kent Stater staff, and several other 
organizations, while a varsity basketballer abandoned the 
court for a term as editor-in-chief of the Daily Kent Stater. 
Eight men were active in Blue Key; five were named in Who's 
Who; a dozen or more won varsity athletic letters; and in 
almost every other club activity in which they participated 
Delts took over posts of leadership. 

Social life continued as usual, with such traditions as the 
"Scummers Hop" becoming ever more firmly established with 
Delta Phi Sigma, whose cry of "Hail, Men!" can be heard 
coming from the house on the Columbus street hilltop. 





FIRST ROW: Paul Hehr, James Brainerd, William Seitz, Sheldon Webster, Roy Winsper, 

Joseph Colonese. 
SECOND ROW: Richard Paskerf, Frank Spechalske, Robert Wentz, Dr. Weldon Williams, 

Robert Beachy, Charles Petty, Lou Federico. 
THIRD ROW: Joseph Perconti, Irwin Klein, Nicholas Tsoucalas, Russell Gray, William Jones, 

John Finn, William Fulmer, Randy Newhouse, Roy Hein, Pat Milodore. 




FI.RST ROW: Kent Eby, James Von Gilder, Robert Sonnhalter, Jack Shrimplin, Irvin Wheat- 
ley, Alexander Smith. 

SECOND ROW: James Busson, Bernard Rickleman, Fred Klaisner, Henry Ford, Richard 
Wolfe, James Brindza, Thomas Katin. 

THIRD ROW: Emil George, Robert Norris, William Juhn, Edward Mro2, John Shirilla, 
Robert Von Ko'^nel, John Forrest, George Ulvild, William Sudeck. 




169 



FIRST ROW: Martin Juhn, Tony Simone, Fred Russell, Tony Reto, Bill Knight, Bill Wolf. 
SECOND ROW: Joe Finelli, Paul Sweeney> Frank Mesek, Art Davies, Joe Zaiudny, Frank 

Polichene. 
THIRD ROW: Rudy Gerbitz, Dick McAllister, Dick Wenger, Dick Schlup, Don Schaller, Fred 

Baker, Wade Milford. 




202 North Lincoln St. 



ROBERT DURIVAGE President 

FRANK LEONARD Vice-President 

JOHN SCHICK Secretary 

ROBERT SHEETS Treasurer 



White leather and nailheads brighten this 
corner of the Gamma house, and, iocidentally. 
also show off the trophy case. 



John, Wes, Jim, and Bob all think that Peggy 
Lee is quite, quite terrific! 



What's this? Most of the boys at home to- 
night? They must be campused. 




SLEEPY residents of a campus women's dormitory shivered 
their way to their windows, pulled aside the drapes, and 
knelt down to look upon a group of young men and women 
who had braved the cold to sing familiar Christmas carols 
which now rang across the frosty air. 

Carrying out one of its finest traditions was Gamma Tau 
Delta fraternity, which annually presents a yuletide serenade 
for campus dorms and sorority houses, assisted by the mem- 
bers of their sister sorority, Delta Gamma. 

But this was only one of the occasions when the brother- 
sister social groups cooperated in work and play. Together they 
planned and enjoyed swimming, skating, tobogganing, and in- 
formal pre-dance parties. Sunday evenings found Gammas 
dining at the Delta Gam house, or members of the sorority 
enjoying a meal and an evening of dancing and music at 202 
N. Lincoln, long-time home of the Gammas. 

Immediately after returning to school last Fall, members of 
Gamma Tau Delta went to work on the project of redecorat- 
ing the fraternity house. Many hours and thousands of paint- 
brush strokes later, they proudly opened wide their doors, toss- 
ed out the welcome mat, and invited everyone on campus to 
survey their work. 

Visitors found a new soundproof ceiling, light green walls, 
an in-the-wall trophy case, and a leather-upholstered stairway 
— all outstanding features of the modernistic front room. 

Once again a local social fraternity began to make plans to 
go national. Like many other groups on campus, the Gammas 
had formerly been an educational fraternity as national Sigma 
Tau Gamma, and had made a good record on campus as a 
local. With this record behind them, and aided by the fact that 
they own their own house, they have moved toward nationali- 
zation slowly, waiting the moment when they might affiliate 
with one of the top nationals. They too want "nothing but the 
best." 





FIRST ROW: Frederick Scadding, Robert Ryan, Germaine Swanson, Kenneth Webb. 
SECOND ROW: Robert Sheets, Frank Leonard, Robert Durivage, John Schick, William 

Loeblein, Tom Crawford. 
THIRD ROW: John Gressard, Richard Stover, George Groft, Bob Phillips, Frank Bond, 

John Allan, Jack Clark. 




FIRST ROW: Eugene Schmiedl, Ray Looper, Ted Burke. 

SECOND ROW: Bud King, James Luli, Dr. Raymond Ciark, William Shuttleworth, Richard 

Kline. 
THIRD ROW: Russell Johnson, Alan Larson, William Davis, Frank Vendely, William Greaves. 




171 



FIRST ROW: Arnold Lewis, Tracy DeForrest, Jack Rehner. 

SECOND ROW: Bob Ginther, Wesley Kemp, James Rector, Mr. Victor Grovereau, Bud 

Wilgohs. 
THIRD ROW: Howard Netzley, Bob Fornsworth, Harvey McCorkle, Dick Bamberger, 

Roger Francey. 



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132 South Lincoln St. 



WALLACE KRIVOY President 

JACK HUROWITZ Vice-President 

BOB CASEY Secretary 

BILL BECHERER Treasurer 



:^=^^^1S 



The new combination radio from the pledges 
gets a workout from the actives. Are those 
more party records? 



George, the "Kamook Krupa," goes to work 
on the drums in the smoker. John is more 
interested in the piano. 



'Tis music when Larry's around! Makes one 
think of days around a campfire. 



TT' APPA MU KAPPA, the university's oldest fraternal or- 



JS. 



ganization, celebrated twenty-five years on campus last 



April with a gala Silver Jubilee all-university dance, attended 
by more than a thousand smdents. 

In honor of the anniversary, the fraternity planted a 25-foot 
larch tree near the concrete K on the front campus, placed 
there by the fraternity on a earlier occasion. On Campus Night 
the tree was surrounded by a large crowd eager to watch the 
painting of the K, which traditionally opens the KSU May 
Day activities. 

Fifty brothers of Kappa Mu Kappa, attired alike in black 
trousers, white shirts, fraternity emblems and golden sashes, 
marched from the house at 132 S. Lincoln across the street 
to the campus to start the ceremony. 

In a convertible sedan, following the marching KMK's, 
came the fraternity sweetheart and K-Girl, iVIarian Bruns of 
Alpha Xi Delta sorority. She officially touched oflf the Campus 
Day festivities by applying the first dab of white paint to the 
K. Retiring President Roy Apple and incoming prexy Wallace 
Krivoy completed the painting of the K, as fraternity mem- 
bers formed a large circle around the trio and sang KMK songs. 

Thus tradition-minded Kappa Mu Kappa continued one of 
the University's many colorful customs, while demonstrating 
the KMK ideal of a well-rounded fraternity; for in the circle 
around the K could be found campus leaders in athletics, 
politics, journalism, dramatics, scholarship, and other fields, 
including the Student Council president. University social 
chairman, a Kent Stater editor and outstanding thespians. 

Homecoming also was a successful day for the fraternity, as 
Kappa Mu Kappa won the trophy for the most original house 
decorations. The house was redecorated with modernistic 
painting, lighting and furniture in time to welcome the hun- 
dreds of fraternity alumni who had remrned for the week-end. 

The year's achievements of Kappa Mu Kappa continued 
to be recorded in the KMK magazine Skull and Crossbones, 
sent to alumni as well as fraternity men on campus. 





FIRST ROW: Pat Del Vecchio, Bob Weymueiier, Howard Atwood, Bruce Walker. 
SECOND ROW: John Laurenson, Bill Byrne, Jack Baker, Oliver Schneider, Ward Robinson. 
THIRD ROW: Bill Henry, Glenn Barber, Larry Vitsky, Jack Wendelken, Bob Davis, Joe 
O'Hara, Bob Eckelberry, Fred Watson, Bob Heighberger. 




FIRST ROW: Frank Case, Bob McGowan, Al Tischendorf, Jim Cramer, Leonard Snider, 

Bill Beier. 
SECOND ROW; Cecil Laraway, Ray Hyser, Gene Horrison, Terry Atkinson, Park Shriver. 
THIRD ROW: Bob Danford, Michael Vinciguerra, Glenn Stockhouse, Bob Shedden, Bob 

King, Don Thomas-Moore, Gene Vezie, Harry Griffiths, George Kenney, Charles 

Goetzinger. 




173 



FIRST ROW: Bob Lengacher, Wilbur Schneider, Bob Jones, Bill Crorey. 
SECOND ROW: John Wolcott, Jack Hurowitz, Wolly Krivoy, Bob Casey, Bill Becherer. 
THIRD ROW: Howard Hyser, Porter Hall, Bob Clark, Alan Poese, Bernard Sharkey, Roy 
Newsome, George Pelton, Tom Crawford. 



KAPPA SIGMA CHI 




Cfnlj 



210 South Willow St. 



RUDY RUZICH President 

WES KURTZ Vice-President 

JOHN BOTU Secretary 

ANTHONY THOMAS Treasurer 



A few of "the boys" offer a toast to one of 
their members who has just taken the big 
step — toward marriage. 



Here's one fellow who believes the oM saying. 
"Every KSU girl a queen." Looks Hke his 
buddies are more than a little interested, too. 



^^'■««^ 



W ,.■ : . ; 



i .... ■ i 



Bill points out a few things as the Kappa Sigs 
bed down among the books during mid-terms. 





TN 1931 a group of independent men decided that the Uni- 
-*- versity could support another Greek organization. They had 
all been members of an independent club, enjoyed each other's 
friendship, and decided that rather than join an already-estab- 
lished fraternity they would found one of their own. 

Those first few years were an uphill struggle. When World 
War II came along and the fraternity was forced to become 
inactive, it was firmly established, but by no means a campus 
power. But in 1946 pre-war members began to remrn from the 
war, and they came back determined that things would be a 
little different. 

Kappa Sigma Chi fraternity was successful. Within a year 
the organization, now 16 years old, was right up at the top, 
scrambling for first place in campus fraternity leadership. 

In the spring of '47 the group continued its tradition of se- 
lecting a Kappa Sigma Chi sweetheart to reign at the Sweet- 
heart Dance. This year Carolyn Stofcho of Alpha Omega was 
chosen to carry on the tradition and reign over the affair. 

Meanwhile fraternity pledges added to student's musical 
education by throwing a jazz concert which drew swarms of 
hepcats to the auditorium. 

On the serious side. Kappa Sigs also were active. Lack of 
coordination between University organizations which resulted 
in widespread confusion gave rise to a successful idea carried 
out by a Kappa Sig. The plan biought all campus leaders to- 
gether into a Council of Presidents organized to increase co- 
operation and suggest solutions to campus problems. 

Last Fall the fraternity took another Bunyanesque stride 
forward by purchasing its own house on South Willow Street. 
There, one step from a campus hangout and one block from 
the campus, the Kappa Sigs smdy and engage in the bull ses- 
sions which are such an important part of fraternity life. 





FIRST ROW: DonMaxwell, Frank Zima, Charles Wiland, Art Kambury. 
SECOND ROW: Tom Welsh, Dick Zimmerman, Sam Dudra, Earl Ford, Bill Fike. 
THIRD ROW: Ed Spisak, Gene Erwin, Bill Williams, Dom Palumbo, Merle Wiese, Chuck 
Stewart. 




FIRST ROW: Gene Beachley, Mickey McDermott, Tom Gallagher. 

SECOND ROW: Curt Sarff, Dr. Leon Marshall, Mr. Andrew Paton, Dr. Maurice Palmer. 

THIRD ROW: Joe Leatherman, Hugh Davis, Jerry Cummins, John Wilhelm, Pete Ulrich. 




175 



FIRST ROW: George Schuran, Harold Washburn, Larry Avrill, Judd Moore. 
SECOND ROW: Tony Thomas, John Botu, Rudy Ruzich, Wes Kurtz, Don Cox. 
THIRD ROW: John Kocher, Lorry Theiss, Don Renwand, Bob Wolcott, Martin PfinsgroflF, 
Mario Piastrelli. 



PHI 




603 East Main St. 



JAMES C. RHOADS President 

RUSSELL HAWSMAN Vice-President 

HAROLD BARDEN Secretary 

EVERETT JENKINS Treasurer 



Here the boys try their hand at cooking. Bob 
is quite intent on his soup — but you never can 
lell. Bob: too many cooks still may spoil that 
broth! 



Keith is given the once-over by the 
actives. Jim's sardonic smile shows his and 
the others' enjoyment of the sport. 



^1 



Three of the boys are just relaxing while 
Jerry and Bob seem to be preoccupied with 
other matters — could be studies, even. 



TWENTY-FOUR underprivileged children of Kent stared 
goggle-eyed at the huge Christmas tree, as if this were a 
little too much to believe. And among them, catering to their 
every wish, were the brothers of Phi Beta Phi, as pleased as 
the kids at the success of their annual Christmas party. 

This is the outstanding characteristic of Phi Beta Phi, its 
members believe. The fraternity prides itself on devotion to 
the interests of the university and the community. Other 
charitable activities this year included the fraternity trip with 
a group of children to a baseball game in Cleveland. 

Of course, in addition to the performance of these civic 
duties, the fraternity, like any other, has social life of its own. 
Shortly after the beginning of the new year the Phi Betas held 
their annual winter formal in Cleveland. 

Founded in 1938, the fraternity went inactive during the 
war, and was one of the first to be revived in the autumn of 
1945. Since then. Phi Beta Phi has been working — very suc- 
cessfully, the men believe — toward nationalization. The re- 
cently-redecorated house at 603 E. Main street, on the corner 
of University drive, is one strong material argument in their 
favor. 

During the last eighteen months, Phi Beta Phi has risen in 
general esteem on campus. Determination and tremendous 
energy and effort may have had something to do with this, 
for the fraternir)' carried off top honors last spring in both 
Pork Barrell and the Campus Night parade. A Phi Beta brother 
also won the 1947 Most Popular Man election. 

In February of this year the Memorial Stadium got the 
campus kick-off signal and once again it was a member of Phi 
Beta Phi who led the way : A Phi Beta member of the Smdent 
Stadium Committee took over the first day of the individual 
drive and guaranteed it a roaring start. But the Phi Beta Phi's 
still continue to predict "This is only the beginning." With a 
firm background and a host of new pledges the group is ready 
to hold its own. 





FIRST ROW: Richard E. Swigart, Neal Manning, Williom Wilde, James Bisett, Dave Roth. 
SECOND ROW: Joseph Ciresi, James Rhoods, Prof. John Montgomery, Russell Hawsman, 

Herman Speck. 
THIRD ROW: James Himes, Donald Livesey, James O'Brien, Paul Lawson, Joseph Moron, 

George ErHer. 




FIRST ROW: Keith Gainey, Dick Erdley, Jerry Overholt, Owen McCafFerty. 
SECOND ROW: Don Kagey, Bob Sm-'lhe, Everett Jenkins, Tom White, Gene Woodson. 
THIRD ROW: William Reichord, Bob Hosteller, Dave Calvin, Glenn McDermott, Bert 
Searles. 




177 



FIRST ROW: Edwin Elson, Ralph Stark, Carl Weinke, Glen Woodson, Joseph Hunf. 
SECOND ROW: Richard Knab, Vincent Alessi, Ralph Wuest, Joseph Abrutz, Ed Fried). 
THIRD ROW: John McNamara, Richard Frame, John Kramer, Frank McCleman, James 
Brown, Fred Green, Robert Erdley. 



PHI GAMMA THETA 




Meeting at 122 Francis Dr. 



JACK URCHEK President 

TOM WILHELM Vice-President 

WARREN JEVNIKAR Secretary 

CHUCK LAFFERTY Treasurer 




Phigams go over plans for their big Winter 
project, featuring the Cleveland Browns' movie. 
Watch out there, fella! Don't fall asleep. 



My. aren't these Sunday night sessions fun! 
Never thought life in a dull ol' frat house 
could be like this. 



The Phigam paddle holds no fear for actives, 
safe in the basement rec room. But wait 'till 
those pledges are on the other end of the 
board! 



SINCE their inception in the spring of 1947, members of 
Phigammatheta looked forward to the time when they 
would be recognized by Inter-Fraternity council as a KSU 
local fraternity. Toward rhis end of proving themselves worthy, 
they were whole-heartedly behind one or another of the campus 
drives. 

Students attending Golden Flash home basketball games 
during the winter heard the Phigammathetas repeat their yell 
as they made the rounds selling refreshments. All profits were 
turned over to the stadium drive. 

This project was in addition to their distinction of being 
the first organization on campus to contribute cash to the fund. 

Professor Merle Wagoner became sponsor of the group 
immediately after it was founded, and a short time later 
Professor William Taylor became its advisor. Phigams realize 
that the aid of the two genial faculty members has been in- 
valuable during the first difficult year, and credit for the initial 
successes goes largely to these faculty men. 

Phigams are particularly proud of their advanced views 
concerning the responsibility of a fraternity. In their general 
plan of organization is included a cultural program designed 
to benefit the Phigam man in his associations with the univer- 
sity, fellow students, and his fraternity brothers. 

Youth has its drawbacks, but Phigammatheta has found its 
latent advantages as well. These include being able to start 
off on an entirely new program without fearing violation of 
what has gone before. 

Early in the Spring quarter the Phigams realized their fore- 
most immediate goal. On April 22, Inter-Fraternity council 
granted them recognition as a local campus fraternity and the 
Phigams became Phi Gamma Theta. fledging Greek organi- 
zation of the campus. 

Realizing this position, the Phi Gams are attempting to 
build a new conception of their fraternity life, and, along with 
it, new traditions. Its members are spurred by the hope that 
they will succeed and that soon Phi Gamma Theta will be a 
leading campus power. 





FIRST ROW: Bill Criswell, Len Price, Bob Evans. 
SECOND ROW: Hank Fusco, Dick Kotis, Paul Loos. 




FIRST ROW: Warren Jevnikar, Frank Klein, Jim Kline. 

SECOND ROW: John Morris, Bob Chambers, Phil Dempsey, Chuck Lofferty. 




179 



FIRST ROW: Jack Urchek, Bill Chastain, Art Seyler. 
SECOND ROW: Chuck Cook, Tom Wilhelm, Neal Nelson. 




Ernest Rowland 




e^e, a'ce catcA beaucL tt. 



Modern psychologists have many a time borne out this statement of 
Oliver Goldsmith, who perhaps was the first to realize that physical activity 
can aid the mind as well as the body. 

Excess exuberance of young newcomers to the campus finds an outlet 
in organized sports; older students take a little time oif from their established 
routine of study to relax and keep physically fit: these are participants in the 
intramurals program. 

For a group with an entirely different purpose, "the sport is the thing." 
These are the men who comprise the varsity squads — the few responsible for 
building the reputation of KSU in the eyes of other teams. 

Essentially, however, the purpose of intramural and varsity athletes is the 
same. Whether old or young, he-man or coed, all can forget everyday cares 
in the heat and good sportsmanship of athletic competition. 



Sports Ye a r 



181 




First Row: J. Coll. F. Solak, W. Weir, N. Nelson, R. Paskert, F. Burmeister, V. Mclntire, H. Schoonover, 

J. Urchek. 
Second Row: P. Hehr. K, Harsh. J McNaughton, W. Kurtz, D. Palumbo, T. Evans. R. Harris, L. Pigat. 

Coach W. Stevens. 
Third Row: R. Battista. J. Mileski, I Pisani. T, Malanev, R. Stevenson. G. Kovalick. L. Snvder. D. Tilton. 

R. Miller 



In a conference with two of his mound staff, 
coach Wes Stevens gives some pre-game advice to 
pitchers Tom Evans and southpaw Karl Harsh. 



'T^HE first Kent State post-war baseball season ended with 

the presentation of varsity "K's" to 21 baseballers who 

compiled a season record of six wins, seven losses, and one tie. 

Coach Wes Stevens did not have to look far for men who 
could belt the pellet, for, at the end of the campaign, he had no 
less than seven men above the .300 mark. Bill Weir, Jim Coll, 
Tom Kot, Jack Urchek, Wes Kurtz, Dick Paskert, and Larry 
Snyder closed the season with better than one for three aver- 
ages. Weir led the sluggers with a sensational .451 average. 

Hank Burmeister was the top percentage pitcher with two 
victories against no defeats. 

Highlight of the season was a three-day road trip to Ada, 
Ohio and Lafayette, Indiana where the Flashes encountered 
Ohio Northern and Purdue University. 




Lanky Jim Coll safely stretches a single into 
a two-bagger m an inter-squad game. 



Kent State can claim a "Murderer's Row"' too. Heavy hitters of last season 
were Dick Paskert, Hal Schoonover, Jim Coll, and Neal Nelson. 




182 




Not all of the men on the track team are wiry 
and speedy. Husky footballer Rudy Gerbitz needs 
his size to hurdle the heavy shot. 



First Row: S. LeVine, B. Rickelman, G. Blaurock, R. Mowery, R. Beachy, W. Pistner, R. Eroskey. R. Wolfe, 

W. Moritz. 
Second Row: R. Frame, V. Vitale, T. Clark. W. Cox, J. Helleis, L. Prasek, R. Gerbitz, S. Wolfe, I. Lockridge. 
Third Row: Coach J. Begala, E. Knever. H. Speck, J. Warner, J. DelSantro, H. Clark, F. McClimon, R. 

Rairigh. R. Bollman, R, MacAIlister, Assistant coach K. Chestnutt. 
Fourth Row: G. Mills, .1. Warner, L, Klein, J, Sparks, E. Greenwood. D, Kratzer, 



^^ACK XEAite 



T 7" ARSITY track came back on campus after a wartime lay- 
off of five years, with Joe Begala coaching the cindermen. 

Out of a seven-meet schedule, of which five were dual meets, 
the tracksters managed to notch two victories while going 
down to defeat five times. The Blue and Gold bested Mount 
Union College and Fenn College and were beaten by Bowling 
Green University, Case Tech, and Western Reserve in dual 
meets. In two triangular meets KSU finished in third place. 

Although every man on the team was participating in col- 
lege track for the first time, a host of new squad records were 
made. Dick Frame set a new mark in the 120-yard high hurdles, 
while Dick Mowery did the same in the 220-yard low hurdles; 
the high jump and pole vault records were broken by Tom 
Clark and Herm Speck respectively; and the 880-yard and 
mile relay teams shattered the previous record. 



Taking a few warm-up turns around the field are fleet tracksters Richard 
Mowery. Henry Clark, Robert Bollman and Robert Rairigh. 



Caught by the camera in mid-air as he is about 
to clear the bar is Herm Speck. 




183 




r^ h> 



f^ J% 






h ^ ^ .ef- 




First Row: Walter Wojno. William Osterlund. Tom Saltsman, Joseph Kotys, Donald Wilson. 

Second Row: Richard Paskert. William Casey, Lee Baker, Paul Cook, Forrest Benner, Professor Wesley Stevens. 

Third Row: Richard Hamf, Harry Burnell, Ben Allbcrry, Robert Keith, Robert Von Kaenel. 



. SWIMMING TEAM 



Tj NJOYING the most successful season in the Uni- 
-'--' versity's history, the natators, coached by Wes 
Stevens, racked up an impressive nine wins as against 
only two losses in dual meets. 

The crack 400-yard freestyle relay team, composed 
of Tom Saltsman, Bill Osterlund, Walter Wojno, and 
Captain Don Wilson, won eight straight until Fenn 
handed them their first and only defeat of the season, 
to wind up the campaign with an impressive 10-1 
record. 

At the end of the season, the mermen journeyed to 
Cleveland where they took fifth place in the Fenn 
relays. 

In the Ohio Conference meet at Oberlin, the tank- 
ers encountered better success. They placed no less 
than ten men in the finals and captured third place. 

The marked improvement in the squad can best 
be seen in comparison with the 1946-47 team which 
won only two meets out of twelve and placed but one 
man in the Ohio Conference finals to wind up in 
fifth place in the standings. 




WES STEVENS 



184 




Walter Wojno, fi 



KSU 


35 


KSU 


36 


KSU 


50 


KSU 


26 


KSU 


49 


KSU 


57 


KSU 


43 


KSU 


44 


KSU 


20 


KSU 


46 


KSU 


47 


KSU 


5 


KSU 


16 


KSU 


11 


KSU 


71 


KSU 


181 


KSU 


16 


KSU 


10 


KSU 


14 


KSU 


16 


KSU 


195 


KSU 


111 


KSU 


13 



SWIMMING RECORD 

Carnegie Tech. 31 

Wooster 30 

Baldwin- Wallace 25 

Ohio University 49 

Baldwin-Wallace 17 

Wittenberg 18 

Ohio Wesleyan 23 

Wooster 21 

Fenn College 46 

Slippery Rock 20 

Wittenberg 19 

GOLF RECORD 

Denison 11 

John Carroll 

Fenn College 5 

Ohio University 8V2 

Canton K.S.U.C 51-2 

Western Reserve 

Denison 6 

Fenn College 2 

Hiram College 

Canton K.S.U.C 41/2 

Western Reserve 6I/2 

Mount Union 3 



GOLF TEAM 



"P UNNING true to his practice of turning out 
-'-^ winning teams, Coach Harry Adams shaped a 
large turnout of golf candidates into a smooth-strok- 
ing team which won ten matches and lost only two. 

Paced by sub-par men Bill Holland and Loreto 
George, the linksters ran up a total of 158 points 
while holding their opponents to only 52 markers. 

The season started rather shakily, but as the men 
gained experience and confidence their playing began 
to improve and KSU became the team to beat on the 
links. 

After dropping their opener to Denison, the golfers 
captured their next two matches and then lost a 
heartbreaker to Ohio University by one point. 

The team then found itself and embarked upon an 
eight-game winning streak which carried them to the 
end of the season. They gained revenge by trouncing 
Denison in a return match and went on to topple 
Western Reserve and K.S.U.C. twice, and Fenn, 
Hiram, and Mount Union once each. 




First Rov Lurcu Glui^^, Jay Lemon, Evan Lemley. Dick Enright. Bill 

Holland 
Second Row. Dick Masterson, Jack Ruble, Eueene Grimm. 



185 




Coach Begala receiving an award from the 
Booster Club on behalf of his wrestHng team 
at the BC's annual dance. 



NO other phase of athletics has accomplished more in the 
way of spreading the name of Kent State University 
than the Coach Joe Begala's wrestling teams. 

Since Coach Begala came to the Kent State campus his 
teams have ranked among the best in the country. The veteran 
mentor boasts one of the outstanding coaching records to be 
compiled. His squads have totalled 127 victories in 152 en- 
gagements, with one ending in a draw, for an over-all per- 
centage of .841 plus. 

Three of his teams have gone through the season undefeated, 
those of '35, '36, and '47. 

In inter-state competition, held annually in Cleveland, Be- 
gala's squads hold the edge in victories. In the eleven years of 



competition, Kent State has won the title no less than eight 
times, bettering outstanding entries from New York, Penn- 
sylvania, Michigan, Indiana, West Virginia, and Illinois. 

However, one of the marks which Begala prizes most is 
the Blue and Gold superiority over Ohio University in recent 
years. Prior to 1933, Ohio U. had a string of 17 consecutive 
years without a loss to a Buckeye state team. Begala, former 
captain of the Ohio U. team, broke that streak in his fourth 
year at Kent and has amassed a total of thirteen wins to two 
defeats since. 

Stressing rigorous physical training and practice. Coach 
Begala has proved that a team in shape is the team that wins. 



186 



^A^^.,,^fj 



WRESTLING 



TTTRESTLING Coach Joseph Begala, genial, rotund pro- 
^ prietor of Begala Beach, managed to scrape together 
enough winning competitors to put together a ten-meet sched- 
ule for his 1948 grappling campaign. 

Shunned by larger schools, the Begalamen have had a hard 
time lining up opposition for the high-flying toe twisters. 
When the matchmaking is in full bloom, the Golden Flashes 
seem to find most of the best lurking in obscure, dark corners. 

Several "name" teams ventured out into the open and were 
immediately signed by the KSU grappling experts, along with 
some of the Buckeye teams. 

Chief among the big squads were Syracuse, Indiana State 
Teachers, Lock Haven ( Pa. ) State Teachers, Kansas State, and 
three formidable Ohio teams. — Case Institute of Technology, 



Findlay, and Ohio University, Begala's alma mater. 

The Flashes went through their program with a total of 
eight wins against two setbacks — both by close decisions. 
Case turned the tables on the Golden Flashes, 15-13 early in 
the season and then the Orange of Syracuse performed an 18-8 
operation on the Blue and Gold. 

Although the Begalamen lost to Case, they were stiU con- 
ceeded the Ohio State championship crown since the Tech 
team met only six Ohio competitors and lost to Ohio U. 

Promising freshmen, unable to perform in dual meets be- 
cause of Ohio conference rules, give the 1949 season a rosy 
outlook, along with several lettermen that Begala will have 
remrning to the mat wars next year. 



CoaLh Joe Begala, whose wresriing squads have been consistenily among the country's better 
teams, shows Gene Glass how to break the hold that Mike Slepecky has on him. Judging 
by the determined look on Slepecky's face. Glass isn't going to have an easy time of it. 



Bob Bader latching on to his Syracuse University opponent in 
the 165-pound match . , . That's Mike Milkovitch submarining 
under his Kansas State man in the 175-pound fracas. 




187 





GENE GLASS 




T_l HADING the impressive list of matmen returning last 
-*- -*- season were Gene Glass, who broke his wrist at the start 
of the 1946-47 season and was forced to the sidelines. Jack 
Shrimplin, Vince Vitale, Ray Bickler, Bob Bader, the Milko- 
vitch brothers, John and Mike, and a holdover from before the 
war, Mike Slepecky. 

Additional strength was found in Ignatius Russo, Dick 
Kline, much improved over the 1946-47 season, Joe Kloster- 
man, Dave Roth, Ralph Wilson, George Calogar, and Richard 
Mihaleye. 

Slepecky, interstate champion and national collegiate run- 
ner-up in 1941, re-entered KSU just before the grappling cam- 
paign opened and got into shape in time for the Baldwin 
Wallace fracas to further strengthen the Flashes' mat hopes. 



The situation is reversed- Mike Slepecky, who usually does the pushing around, is getting a 
taste of the mat and how it feels in the Syracuse match — one of the two dual meets that 
Kent State lost last season. 



IGNATIUS RUSSO 



^: k 



188 



ROBERT BADER 






JACK SHRIMPLIN 



MIKE SLEPECKY 



JOE KLOSTERMAN 




:__ "VT 7INDING up their season with ten victories as against 
* ' two defeats, the Begalamen also finished the year by win- 
ning seventy of their ninety-six bouts, and tallied 280 points 
to their opponents seventy-six. 

In KSU's attempt to repeat as the Interstate champs, the 
grapplers placed five men in the semi-finals but failed to gain 
a first and fell into a tie for fourth place. 

However, they fared better in the Northeastern Ohio dis- 
trict AAU meet and walked off with second place. Only two 
veterans entered the meet. They teamed up with freshmen 
Tom Hanson, Gil Montague, Gil Dubray, Armando Caperna, 
and Nathan Simon. 

In the National Junior AAU tourney, Mike Milkovich won 
the 175-pound championship while Montague and Dubray 
notched second places. 



The referee gives John Milkovitch two points for a taicedown during the match with Syracuse 
University. John is busy trying — rather successfully — to tie up his opponent and bring his 
shoulders to the mac to store a pui and garner another five points for KSU. 




RALPH WILSON 





189 




MIKE MILKOVrrCH 



In a huddle with his assistants, head -.oach Trevor Rees maps out a plan of strategy. The coaches are; Wes Stevens, line coach; George Lynn, freshman mentor; Rees; Harry 
Adams, end coach; and Karl Chestnutt, line coach. 




>■ v .Ti i^A . < ♦•* ^ A^ -<y*M*H' 



Did he make the badly needed first down? In a tense moment of a crucial game even the substitutes sitting on the bench claim their share of the conflict and suspense that 
their teammates on the field are enduring. 



190 



In the office or on the field, Trevor Rees directs 
the university's athletic program to provide 
facilities and instruction for all phases of sports 
activities. 




On the field the coaching position demands alertneis 
and quick action. Typical is the last minute briefing of 
All-Ohio guard, Frank Mesek. 



AS the football squad trots onto the field in the 
opening game of the season, spectators see the 
finished product of weeks of arduous physical team 
training. They also see the culmination of months of 
strenuous work accomplished by the university ath- 
letic ofiice. 

Scheduling of games, transportation difficulties, 
hours of paper work — these and various other tasks 
constituted only the smallest part of the momentous 
job of organizing a football team. 

But as the autumn season came the plans shaped 
into reality. Little problems were stiU to be ironed 
out, but in the main football was here and the hours 
of effort began to show results. 

Leading KSU's second postwar team was energetic 



young Trevor Rees with his capable assistants Harry 
Adams, Karl Chestnutt, Wes Stevens, Joe Begala, and 
a newcomer from Ohio State University, George 
Lynn, who headed the freshman football squad. 

With the emphasis on stronger and better football 
teams, coach Rees dropped from his schedule several 
"breather" opponents. Turning to more formidable 
foes, Rees scheduled such recognized football powers 
as Miami University and Youngstown College. 

The need for a stadium became more apparent as 
only rwo games were scheduled for the home field. 
But spirited student effort combined with help from 
local business groups and alumni aid gave clear in- 
dication of adequate stadium facilities for the next 
football season. 



191 




Mount Union Even 



TN the first collegiate football game to be played in Canton's 
-^ Fawcett stadium, an opening day throng of 13,000 spec- 
tators witnessed the inauguration of Kent State's "new era" in 
football with its brother combination of Tommy and Leo Kot 
passing their way to a 13-6 victory over a highly favored 
Mount Union eleven. 

Halftime ceremonies were highlighted by the performance 
of the Cleveland Brown's Musical Majorettes, led by George 
"Red" Bird. 

Kent State's newly-organized Booster Club sponsored a foot- 
ball train, the first in the history of the university, and carried 
397 student members to and from the game. 




ent ... 13 



Mount Union 6 




GEORGE MILLS 

Fullback 



PAUL SWEENEY 

Halfback 



192 




Virg Roman's right toe punches the pigskin true in the Miami gome played under the arc lights at the Rubber Bowl. It was a sad caravan of cors which wound 
its way bock to Kent from the Bowl, to return later in the season to victory. 



FRANK KLEIN 
Tackle 




t .... 7 



Miami ... 35 



"\ /TORE than 14,000 frantic football fans jammed the Rub- 
-'-'-'- ber Bowl in Akron to see the Golden Flashes go down in 
bitter defeat before the mighty Miami University Redskins 
from Oxford, 35-7. 

Kent State's lone touchdown came in the third period when 
quarterback Neal Nelson tossed a ten-yard pass to halfback 
Bob Beachy who scampered the two remaining yards for the 
score. 

Outplaying their hosts in every statistical department, the 
Redskins, led by All-Ohio quarterback Mel Olix and left 
halfback Ara Parseghian, compiled an overwhelming total of 
293 yards rushing to the Flashes's 132. 




PAT DEL VECCHIO 



HOWIE WOLFGRAM 
Halfback 



?RAHK MESEK 
Guard 



193 




GEORGE KOVALICK 

Guard 



Quarterback Johnny Moore hands the ball off to Paul Sweeney as the fleet holfback cracks into a hole opened up by George Kovalick. Wib Little and Ho 
Wolfgram add deception to the play. The flag in the background should have been at half mast — KSU lost. 



TI? NTERING the Wooster game as the heavy favorite to win, 
-*— ' the visiting Golden Flashes developed a severe case of 
"fumbilitis" and lost their second game in a row by the score 
of 13-6, 

Dropping the pigskin seven times — four times within easy 
striking range of the Scot goal — the Flashes literally gave the 
game away and slipped into ninth place in the Ohio conference 
standings. 

Led by the steady ground-gaining of Wib Little and Paul 
Sweeney and the passing of Bob Beachy, KSU compiled more 
than twice the yardage that Wooster did. A pass from substi- 
tute halfback Fred Russell to end Bob Evans in the final quarter 
provided Kent's only touchdown. 




ent .... 6 



Wooster . . .13 




Neal Nelson and Wib Little lead interference for ball 
Sweeney as he picks up six yards on the Wooster field. 



BILL BARTON 

Quarterback 



It seems that the principles of modei 
classrooms and onto the football field. 



I dance ore carried out of the 



194 




The big boys close in on Howie Wolfgrom, 140 pounds and seven ounces of running dynamite, in the Kalamazoo game. Wotfgram hurtles over bandaged Johnny 
Moore in an effort to pick up yardage in the homecoming triumph. 



PAUL LOOS 

Halfback 




ent ... 13 



Kalamazoo . 



TT 716 LITTLE, Kent's "Newcomerstown Express," staged a 
' ' one-man exhibition of football to the delight of an over- 
flow Homecoming Day crowd of 6,000 frenzied students and 
alumni to give the Golden Flashes their second win of the 
season over the previously undefeated Kalamazoo Hornets, 
13-0. 

Playing the brand of football which earned him All-Ohio 
honors, Little romped through the hapless Hornets for touch- 
down runs of 67 and 20 yards after three scoreless quarters. 

Little's exhibition added another thrill to a thrill-packed 
Homecoming Day, the biggest in the University's history. 




Holfback Fred Russell watches the white lines pass under his fleet feet 
as he chalks up a nineteen yard gain. 



BOB BEACHY 



The "Newcomerstown Express" breaks loose on the direct track to the 
goal posts as Wib Little tallies the touchdown runs. 



195 




tlSIif 



DICK PASKERT 

Tackle 



Picking up steam, halfback Tommy Kol grils his leeth as he prepares to hit the Folcon forward wall. Bent on destructi 
(42) while Neal Nelson mounts the top of the pile to waylay his man. 



r Lou Federico (60) and Wib Little 



A LONG-STANDING jinx was exploded when a favored 
-^ ^ Bowling Green eleven eked out a victory over the Flashes 
in the closing minutes of the game, 21-18. 

Boasting of having never lost a game on the Bowling Green 
home field, KSU wilted in the final five minutes and allowed 
the Falcons to take to the air and score two touchdowns to 
keep intact their Homecoming Day celebrations. 

After BG jumped to an early 7-0 lead it was Wilbur Little 
who put Kent ahead with touchdown runs of 52 and seven 
yards. A quarterback sneak by Neal Nelson finished the scoring 
for the Flashes, but an inspired Falcon aggregation rallied to 
win. 




Kent .... 18 



Bowling Green 21 




The ball can be found in the center of the picture, but there was no forward motion in this play as the Flashe 
up against a stone wall of defense by the Bowling Green eleven. 



BOB EVANS 



196 




flashing his Ipana smile, Wib Little sets sail on a 26 yard jaunt In the defeat of John Carroll. His running mate — behind the bird cage — is Paul Sweeney. Chubby 
Neal Nelson (20) watches Little give the Blue Streaks a run for their money. 



JACK URCHEK 
Guard 




t ... 26 



John Carroll . 7 



' I 'HE "greatest" John Carroll football team in its history 
-*- strutted down to trounce a meager Kent State eleven and 
limped back home to the tune of a 26-7 licking. 

The "bowl-bound" Blue Streaks, who rated the Golden 
Flashes as a breather game, were pushed all over the field by a 
fighting mad Kent team. 

Halfback Paul Sweeney turned in one of the longest and 
finest exhibitions of broken field running seen during the sea- 
son when he caught a short pass from Fred Russell and ran 
90 yards around the field and 41 yards forward to the Carroll 
nine yard line where Russell, on the next play tallied. 




TOM KOT 

Halfback 



After the brawl is over ... All the action of the Carroll gome didn't come during playing time on the field. 
though rivalry was strong, controversy was short lived, and the game went on as usual. 



ROY SNYDER 



197 









fl3^iM^S»*86 







First Row: L. Federico, R. Miller, G. Kovalick, F. Mesek, B. Appel, D. Foilm. 

Second Row: R, Paskert, J. Wilhelm, R. Wolfe, H. Miller, D. Pape, B. Mooradian, F. Klein. 

Thipd Row: R. Davis, P, DelVecchio, R. Evans, G. Ertler, R. Snyder, J. O'Brien. 

Fourth Row: End Coach H. Adams, Line Coach W. Stevens, E. Capri, P. Loos, D. White, R. Sonnhaker, P. Sweeney. 

Fifth Row: Trainer J. Begala, Manager J. Morris, Head Manager F. Spechalske. 



A HECTIC week of inter-campus rivalry, featuring bonfire 



I\ 



rallies and raids on each other's campuses, was victori- 



ously terminated as the favored Flashes trotted off the field 
with a 6-0 win over their greatest rival, Akron University. 

A crowd of 14,195 fans packed the Rubber Bowl to witness 
Wib Little again display his usual stellar brand of ball by out- 
racing the entire Akron team for 78 yards and the only score 
of the night. 

The victory was Kent State's third successive win in their 
oldest gridiron rivalry, dating back to 1923. Previously, the 
Zippers had tallied 11 wins with one scoreless tie. 




• . . . 6 



Akron . . . . 



198 



t ""T^* 







vi 



■«S5. ' **^ A 



i'^^r ■v3.ti'''^i 




First Row: R. Hyser, R. Gerbitz, K. Engel, J. Urchek, P. Guster, R. Kotis, R. Garmus. 

Second Row: T. Wilhelm, J. Hughes, N. Nelson, W. Barton, P. Perman. J. Moore, H. Yoak. 

Third Row: B. Richleman, J. Coll, J. Pisani, T. Kot, G. Mills, V. Mclntire, Head Coach T. Rees. 

Fourth Row: H. Wolfgram, W. Little, F. Russell. R. Bcachy, Freshman Coach G. Lynn, Assistant Line Coach K. Chesnun. 

Fifth Row: Manager W. Seilz, Faculty Manager R. Moran. 




t . . . . 



Youngstown 13 



' I ~HE Golden Flashes closed their season with a dismal note 
-*- as they bowed before the Youngstown College Penguins, 
13-0. 

An overflow crowd of 14,000 packed Rayen Stadium in 
Youngstown expecting to see a running duel between Wib 
Little and Youngstown's Al Campana but saw only half of it. 

While Campana ran roughshod to score both of the Pen- 
guin's touchdowns, one on a 76-yard jaunt. Little was held 
to a total of only eleven yards net rushing by the powerful 
Youngstown line. 

With the passing of Neal Nelson and the running of Paul 
Sweeney, Kent twice drove within easy scoring range but 
failed to tally. 



199 



BASKETBALL 




Aiding the basketball squad is assistant coach 
Karl Chesnutt. 



HARRY ADAMS 

Basketball coach 



J 



200 




The visitors from John Carroll wear a look of grim determination as they 
close in on Leroy Thompson who is about to take a header into the mat. 



Harry Anderson seems to have let the ball slip througl 
the Baldwin-Wallace players are making a futile attempt 



his fingers while 




QTARTING his second year as head basketball coach, Harry 
^ Adams formed the nucleus of the squad from six returning 
lettermen from the 1947 team which won 13 games in 24 
starts. 

Fred Klaisner, 1947 all-conference third team choice, Leroy 
Peoples, Dale Haverstock, Leroy Thompson, Harry Anderson, 
and Bill Sudeck composed the foundation of a hardwood team 
that was to compile the second best record in the university's 
history. 

Among the other candidates that responded to Adams' call, 
Jerry Amico, Lenny Price, George Fulton, John Collver, and 
Hank Urycki, by virtue of their playing prowess, distinguished 
themselves as varsity material. 

From the first day of practice to the final minute of the last 
game it seemed that the team was on. Although the squad 
had its bad moments, some of which resulted in the loss of a 
game or two, it could not be denied that the 1 948 hardwooders 
were good. 

For the first time in the university's basketball history the 
Flashes led the Ohio conference pack at the halfway mark of 
the season but the jinx team. Mount Union, toppled them 
from the top of the heap by defeating the Blue and Gold three 
times out of as many encounters. 

On the other hand, the basketballers bested their arch-rivals, 
Akron University, twice during the season for the first time 
since the 1940-41 campaign and shattered the Zippers' nine- 
game win streak over KSU. 

Big Leroy Thompson led the squad in points scored with 
238 counters but was hard pressed by Dale Haverstock who 
ended the season with 224 tallies; in all, six men finished with 
points over the century mark. 

Thompson and Haverstock, both eligible for the coming 
season, were awarded All-Ohio berths on the 1948 squad. 



201 




JERRY AMICO 

Forward 



lEN PR(CE 

Guard 



Leroy Thompson looks as if he is going to be successful in pushing the ball through 
the hoop while Mount Union looks on. Thompson is being assisted by Jerry Amico. 



DALE HAVERSTOCK 

Guard 



T TARRY ANDERSON netted fourteen points to give the 
-'- -*- Flashes a one-sided 59-39 win over Ashland in their 
opening game, but the team was then edged out by Western 
Reserve, 50-45. Experimenting with a zone defense, the 
Adamsmen abandoned it too late to salvage a victory. 

Entering the win column again with an easy victory over 
Muskingum, the Flashes ran up a streak of five wins before 
being stopped by a powerful Xavier quintet, 60-52. 

The Blue and Gold then ran in reverse and lost four con- 
tests in a row. A tremendous rally in the final quarter of the 
Baldwin-Wallace game almost broke the losing streak at three 
but it fell short and the Flashes lost by three points. 

The skidding cagers journeyed to Akron for a return match 
with the Zippers and managed to score one more point than 
did Akron to once more come out on the long end of the score. 

But the losing streak was enough to drop Kent from the 
Ohio conference lead. 




eason's record 



KSU 59 Ashland 39 

KSU 45 Western Reserve 50 

KSU 76 Muskingum 68 

KSU 58 Youngstown 53 

KSU 61 Albion 55 

KSU 38 Mt. Union 51 

KSU 70 Youngstown 68 

KSU 68 Wooster 56 

KSU 59 Akron 49 

KSU 64 Heidelberg 40 

KSU 87 Youngstown 53 



202 




JOHN COLLVER 

Ml Forward 



LEROY PEOPLES 
Forward 



John Carroll is totally unaware of what is about to happen as Dale Haverstock 
pounces down upon the ball. Jerry Amico looks the situation over from behind. 



BILL COX 

Forward 



HENRY URYCKI 

Forward 




eason's record 



KSU 52 Xavier 60 

KSU 33 Mount Union 35 

KSU 33 Mount Union 46 

KSU 54 Baldwin-Wallace ... 57 

KSU 53 Akron 52 

KSU 46 Bowling Green 62 

KSU 59 John Carroll 44 

KSU 74 Kenyon 47 

KSU 53 Baldwin-Wallace .49 

KSU 68 Heidelberg 60 

KSU 50 Baldwin- Wallace ... 53 

KSU 76 John Carroll 60 



TV'SU threw a scare into the highly-touted Bowling-Green 
-'-^Falcons before succumbing to the Bee-Gee's superior 
height and reserve strength. Supported by Fred Klaisner, who 
tossed in fourteen points, the Flashes jumped to an early eight- 
point lead until the Falcons' reserves saved the game for the 
regulars. 

After beating John Carroll and enjoying a 74-47 field day 
against Kenyon, in which Dale Haverstock dropped in nineteen 
points, the cagers took on a much favored Baldwin-Wallace 
aggregation in a return bout and, sparked by John CoUver and 
Leroy Peoples, eked out a 53-49 win in KSU's last home game. 

Taking to the road for their three remaining games, the 
Flashes journeyed to Tiffin and coasted by the Princes of 
Heidelberg but were handed a loss by the Baldwin- Wallace 
Yellow Jackets in their third meeting of the season by another 
three-point margin. 

The John Carroll Blue Streaks were never a threatening 
factor as KSU romped 76-60, to end the season victoriously. 



203 




BOB HERSMAN 
Center 



'TPHE battle with John Carroll not only marked the end of 
-'- the basketball season but terminated the playing careers 
of two great athletes, Bill Sudeck, and Harry Anderson. 

Sudeck, a senior, completed his fourth season of varsity ball 
and was the first KSU athlete to receive four awards in a single 
sport. He retired with at least two records to his credit. His 
four-year total of 779 points is the highest scored by a Flash 
eager, and his thirty-four points against Kenyon in 1945 re- 
mains as the individual high mark. 

Anderson, a sophomore star, became ineligible for another 
season because of the AAU purity code which prohibits the 
participation of any professional athlete in college sports. 
Anderson is a member of the Chicago White Sox baseball 
chain. 



204 



IN REVIEW 



'T~'HE students of Kent State University could look back on 
-^ the 1947-48 basketball campaign with the greatest satis- 
faction and pride; not only had it been one of the most success- 
ful basketball seasons but it had furthered the university's 
policy of endeavoring to inaugurate the "new era" in athletics. 

Anticipating the future seasons, coach Harry Adams is ful- 
filling well his part in the momentous task of increasing the 
university's athletic prowess. 

Although it was Adams' job to turn out winning teams he 
did not ignore the quality of sportsmanship in his men. The 
Kent State basketball team was conspicuous in its splendid dis- 
play of sportsmanship. On many occasions comment on the 
clean, hard playing of KSU's cagers was brought to the atten- 
tion of coach Adams as well as the university students and 
faculty. 

This rightful praise is even deeper in magnitude because of 
the fact that the Flashes continue to live up to their ideals 
when off the court and on the campus. 

And so it is with all of Kent State's varsity sports; win, lose 
or draw, the opponent leaves the game knowing that the team 
he has just been in competition with has fought hard and bat- 
tled every inch of the way — but has played the game clean. 



Feinting the Youngstown guard out of position, Jerry Amico dribbles past 
him and down the court. Running in to help out is big Leroy Thompson. 



The hosts from Albion are fouling each other in an attempt to see who gets 
possession of the ball. Hank Urycki stands ready to move in. 




205 



MEN'S INTRAMURALS 



A NOTHER year of intramural directing was attributed to 
-^ ^ Vic Moore, who guided and directed all phases of com- 
petition between the various fraternities and independent 
groups on campus. 

Maintaining its claims as the athletic fraternity, the Delta 
Phi Sigma's gloried in the limelight of intramural sports ac- 
tivity. The Delts downed the Godfrey Gophers, independent 
group winners, in the all-university gridiron championship 
tilt, 13-2 and then captured the all-university basketball 
championship by edging out Phigammatheta club in the 
finals, 41-35. 

In other sports Jim Kline gained the undisputed title as 
KSU's top tennis player by capturing the school tennis 
championship twice in succession. 

Kappa Mu Kappa's wrestlers took the interfraternity mat 
crown in the grappling tourney while Kappa Sigma Chi 
fraternity stroked its way to first place in the Greek swimming 
championships. 



Gamma Tau Delta Jim Luli at the net spots a high one in volleyball competition 
against the Kappa Sigs. 



Individual tennis pIay-o£Fs find Jim Kline and Bob Chambers matched in the finals, 
later won by Kline. 




Bill Knight, Delta Phi Sigma coach, goes into 
a huddle with his team during the championship 
contest. The Delts won the all-University grid 
crown from the Godfrey Gophers, independent 
champs. 



Sharks Club swimmers are poised on the edge 
of the home pool as they prepare for a practice 
relay, in anticipation of later competition. 



There's always a fraternity brother at home with 
the rubbing alcohol to come to the rescue of those 
who insist on trying out their armchair theories 
on basketball through intramural games. 



207 




WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS 



UNDER the auspices of the Women's Athletic Association 
board composed of representatives from each sorority 
and dormitory, University women engage in athletics in a pro- 
gram correlated to men's intramurals. 

Making their bid for the trophy awarded to the organization 
compiling most points by the end of the school year, the Alpha 
Xi Delta's took a clean sweep of the ping pong tourney. 
Gamma Phi Beta sorority jumped to the lead in the trophy 
race by winning the volleyball and badminton championships. 

The bowling tournament was won by Beta Gamma sorority, 
while the Off-Campus Girls, an independent organization, 
bested all opposition to emerge victorious in the basketball 
linals. 

Advised by Miss Beverly Seidel, instructor in physical edu- 
cation, the WAA strives to present a suitable intramural ath- 
letic program in which any woman in residence is eligible to 
participate. 



Off-campus, dormitory, and sorority groups were sponsors of basketball teams during 
the heated Winter season. The OfT-Campus gals, an independent group, won the 
coed championship. 



Fred Scadding gives Carol Stilenbauer of Moulton Hall a few pointers as she pre- 
pares to let one slide down the alley. 




This may not be as good as a sandfot, but the back 
driveway provides a line diamond for Ruth Ger- 
don, at bat. Catcher Mary Lou Ebinger, and 
Ump Jean Beckman. 



Maybe it's their swimming style that keeps these 
coeds in good shape . . . 



Advisor Eleanor Mellert beats the rhythm for 
Modern Dancing Club girls as they go through an 
interpretative routine. 



One class where homework is no chore is tennis, 
especially on a warm sunny afternoon. 




Doris Heupel congratulates Mary Ikerman after 
a fast badminton game. 



One of the more graceful sports is carried out in 
the true Robin Hood fashion by archer Marty 
Wilbur and her companions. 



209 










Th 



L 



Frank Carsoti. Jr. 




wati 



L 



an^ii4 Pi 



<eain^ 



wLUt cia^ii wa'ck. 



Thousands of school boys habitually squirm in their seats each afternoon, 
eager to rush to the nearest empty lot. As youngsters grow older the heat and 
dust of the ball diamond give way at four o'clock to club rooms, where far- 
sighted University students learn to supplement and enrich their classroom ex- 
periences through a variety of social, religious, and intellectual activities. 

Unwieldy size has lessened class feeling. The comparatively advanced age 
of most veteran-students has decreased interest in childish frivolity. Class spirit, 
however, is not completely gone; neither is fraternal loyalty. 

Rather, strength of both groups has given way to something finer, as ma- 
ture students recognize the wisdom of mental expansion through extra-curricular 
activity. The four o'clock bell has taken on a new meaning. 



Organizations 



211 




First Row: Miriam Pugh, Marion Lemponen. Jeri Peczel. Betty Faulds. SECOND RoW: Jean Goncher, Felice Faust, Jeanne Cook, 
Matilda Davis, Phoebe Steiner. THIRD Row: Wanda .Lashiey, Doris Wilkes, Eleanor Meek, Marion Cole, Isla SchnaufiFer. 



cardMl key 



WOMEN'S NATION^ 



RVICE HONORARY 



WINTER PLEDGES — First Row: Maxine Evelyn, Marjorie 
Sprott. Second Row: Phyllis Robbins, Janet Gillespie, Terry 
Pugliese. Third Row: Doris Heupel, Martha Lansinger, Alice 
Jean Watson, Elizabeth Hoy, Ann Irons. 




T7 ACH year's Campus Day celebration is led by a group of 
-*— ' coeds dressed in white and carrying red ribbons or flow- 
ers. These are the women of Cardinal Key, national service 
honorary, who are chosen for membership because they lead 
in all university activities, as they do in the annual celebration. 

Other outstanding contributions of the leading honorary 
are the Penny Carnival, Family Day, Leadership Clinic, and 
the sale of campus Christmas cards. Each coed also receives 
birthday greetings from Cardinal Key. 

Working to uphold the honorary 's motto, "Prudence, justice, 
temperance, fortitude: I observe them faithfully, that my serv- 
ices may be genuine, my life complete," are officers Jeanne 
Cook, president, Matilda Davis, Felice Faust, Joy Brand, 
Phoebe Steiner, Marion Cole, and Marion Lemponen. Dr. 
Florence Beall is advisor. 



HONORARIES 



212 




First Row: Jim Bullock, Tom Davey, Irwin Newhouse, John Thomas, Frank Spechalske, Robert Duncan, Robert Wentz. SECOND 
Row: Mickey Dover, Curtiss SarfF, Robert Rector, Donald Warman, Richard Paskerc, Roy Newsome, John Fmn, Wallace Krivoy, 
Robert Casey, John Forrest, Frank Carioti, Jr., William Hugo. 




blURcey 

MEN'S NATIONAF*^fVlCE HONORARY 




One of the most popular persons on the faculty, genial Dean 
of Men, Raymond E. Manchester, acts as advisor to Blue Key. 



' I 'HE first post-war student directory, containing nearly six 
-*- thousand names and addresses, made its appearance on 
campus this winter. Published and sold without profit by Blue 
Key, the directory is a typical example of services offered by 
the men's national honorary. 

Men's correlary of Cardinal Key, the honorary aids in Penny 
Carnival plans, and assists with the Leadership Clinic for of- 
ficers of campus organizations. 

In its sixteenth year on campus. Blue Key has upheld its 
motto, "Serving I Live," by taking charge of Frosh "Week and 
helping with the Stadium Drive and voting details. 

Thirty Blue Key men are led by President John Thomas; 
Frank Vendely, vice-president; Frank Spechalske, secretary; and 
Randolph Newhouse, treasurer. Faculty advisor is Raymond 
E. Manchester, Dean of Men. 




HONORARIES 



INTERNATIONAL PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS FRATERNITY OF 

DELTA SIGMA PI 





KENT STATrUNIVERSlTY 



First Row: Harlan McGrail, Archie Erwin, 
Robert McKee. Morris Galloway. 

Second Row: Joseph Stofsick, Lawrence 
Avril, Allen Poese, Vincent Hudec. George 
Wright. 

Third Row: Dean Arden AUyn, Dr. Donald 
Anthony, Professor Charles Taff. Clifford 
Hancock, Professor Victor Gravereau. 



First Row: Donald Clough. Henry Burg. 
Herman Speck. Rudolph Ruzich. 

Second Row: Leonard Jar\'is, Harold Wash- 
burn, WiUiam Underwood, Melvin Lampe. 

Third Row: Edward Spisak, Roy Newsome, 
Raymond Reno. Frank Vendely, Hugh 
Howes. William Stumpf, Charles Haag. 



HONORARIES 



214 





ROBERT T. RECTOR Headmaster 

WILLIAM L. MYERS Senior Warden 

DENVER STURGILL Junior Warden 

MAX A. WILLIAMS ' . . Treasurer 

WILLIAM G. GIESSE Scribe 

WINTON C. KOCH Historian 



T7 IGHTEEN hundred Business Administration students 
-'— ' argue, complain and sometimes are even well-pleased in 
the registration lines at the B.A. office in Merrill Hall. Behind 
enrollment tables sit members and pledges of Delta Sigma Pi, 
hearing all imaginable excuses for putting someone in a cer- 
tain class after the role has been closed for days. 

Pre-registration red-tape is simplified in the College of 
Business Administrarion through the cooperation of the Beta 
Pi chapter of rhe International Professional Fraternity of 
Delta Sigma Pi. 

Business meetings, field trips, professional meetings, and 
banquets make up most of the activities of this group. Out- 
standing in the events of the fall quarter was participation of 
the group in installation ceremonies of the Beta Tau chapter 
at Western Reserve University's Cleveland College. Harding 



Wichert, 1946-47 Headmaster at KSU, took part in the formal 
installation. To close the term the Akron branch manager for 
a leading outdoor advertising firm spoke at the Christmas 
banquet. 

Highlight of the Winter quarter was a field trip to General 
Electric's Nela Park in East Cleveland, arranged by a former 
Kent State faculty member and alumni of the Beta Pi chapter. 
Twenty-two undergraduate members pledged during the Win- 
ter quarter and were initiated February 21, with an officer of 
the Akron Better Business Bureau as speaker at the formal 
dinner. 

The sixty members of Delta Sigma Pi closed the year with 
a dinner-dance commemorating their sixth birthday as a 
chapter. 




HONORARIES 




First Row : Eleanor Meek, Rosemary Acierno, 

Jeri Petzel. 
Second Row: Marion Cole, Joann Kemp, Ethel 

Schirmer, Jean Goncher, Gloria Sherrets. 



First Row: Clarence Peoples, Mickey Dover. 

Second Row: Frank Carioti, Jr., Professor Mich- 
ael J. Radock, Larry Vitsky, Robert Wentz, 
John Forrest. 



LAM 




PHI 



TI? VERYTHING was quiet in the huge hotel banquet room, 
-*— ' as guests waited expectantly for the announcement of the 
winner of a new cup, presented to the outstanding woman in 
the School of Journalism. 

Marion Cole won the 1948 award, established this year by 
Lambda Phi, women's journalism honorary. The fund for the 
cup was set up by alumna Frances Murphy. 

Operating under a new constitution, Lambda Phi continued 
its sponsorship of an annual FaU term reception to acquaint 
new students with upperclass journalists and faculty members. 
The honorary also gave a luncheon for journalism alumni on 
Homecoming Day, and were co-sponsors of the Northeastern 
Ohio Scholastic Press clinic. 

Officers of the women's honorary were Eleanor Meek, presi- 
dent; Marion Cole, vice-president; and Rosemary Acierno, sec- 
retary-treasurer. Helen Radock was advisor. 



cwiPi 



|iEj| ° 



/^N call to help with the many regular yearly affairs spon- 
^-^ sored by the School of Journalism are the members of 
Chi Pi, men's journalism honorary. 

With Mickey Dover as president, the men this year took 
charge of the annual banquet for recognition of all work on 
publications within the department. Larry Vitsky was student 
banquet chairman, representing Chi Pi. 

Another important day for the men most active in campus 
journalism is the time of the Northeastern Ohio Scholastic 
Press Clinic, scheduled late each spring. For this event Chi Pi 
plans in detail a newsworthy skit, which is covered by students 
from area high schools in competition. Chi Pi also aids the 
women's journalism group in handling NEOSP registrations 
and lunches. 

Serving with Dover as Chi Pi officers were John Forrest, 
Robert Lengacher, and Clarence Peoples. 



HONORARIES 



First Row: Jim Sharp, Helen Mitrovka, Dominic 
DeSimio, Janet Gillespie, Julia Ross. 

Second Row: Professor John Montgomery, Pro- 
fessor Walton Clarke, Professor E. Turner 
Stump, Professor G. Harry Wright, Professor 
Eleanor Gray. 

Third Row: Felice Faust, Jim Bullock, Dorothy 
Ayre, Nick Bozeka, Alan Hammack, Donald 
Shanower, Terry Pugliese, Dorothy Luck. 



First Row: Norman Bertelloti, Eugene Berrodm, 
Professor Robert Kent, Myron Gilbert, Herbert 
Kaley. 

Second Row: Roger Howard, Betty Cibula, War- 
ren Lashley, Miriam Pugh, Professor James 
N. Holm. 

Third Row: Bill Davis, Jeanne Cook, Jeri Pet- 
zel, Wanda Lashley, Professor E. Turner 
Stump. 




ALPHA 




MEGA PI KAPPA DELTA 



National Speech Honorary 



T T 7 HENEVER someone is needed to handle radio sound 
' ^ effects, stage lighting, theatrical make-up, or any other 
number of specialized fields of air and stage dramatics, the 
person possessing this skill is certain to be among the active 
members of Alpha Psi Omega. 

This national speech honorary is the only nationwide or- 
ganization ever founded on the Kent State campus. Grand 
Director is E. Turner Stump, head of the KSU School of 
Speech who began the honorary. 

Professor G. Harry Wright, theater director, also is Alpha 
Psi Omega advisor. Officers include Nick Bozeka, president; 
Terry Pugliese, vice-president; Felice Faust, secretary; and Jim 
Bullock, treasurer. 

Membership in Alpha Psi Omega is through accumulated 
points gained by work in radio or theater, either on or off 
stage. Thirteen speech students were active this year. 



"\ /f ILEAGE record set in representing Kent State through- 
-^^■*- out the nation invariably is set by members of Pi Kappa 
Delta, national honorary speech organization. 

Most important debates this year were held at Bowling 
Green State University, scene of the national convention. But 
debaters also gave up vacations and week-ends to travel to 
Virginia and many of the Great Lakes states to compete ver- 
bally with students from other schools. 

A new accent was introduced by Pi Kappa Delta to the 
KSU stage early in the fall, when Kent State debaters Warren 
Lashley and Roger Howard argued the international court 
system with two English college students. 

Lashley was Pi Kappa Delta president this year, with Betty 
Cibula vice-president; Miriam Pugh, secretary; and Roger 
Howard, treasurer. James N. Holm, a charter member of the 
honorary, was faculty advisor. 



HONORARIES 




First Row: Dorothea Helmaa, Jean DePompei, 

Rella MuQtean. 
Second Row: Lois Webb. Angeline Scourcas. 

Professor Elizabeth Lewis, Doris Heupel, Ruth 

Frederking. 
Third Row: June Hirka. Dorothy Clevenger, 

Aileen Young, Kathleen Vaughan, Betty Hess. 



First Row: Professor Nona Jordan, Norma Jen- 
kins, Bonnie Jean Avant. 

Second Row: Katherine Wiiliams, Margaret 
Sawyer, Professor Alice Haley, Carol Shindle- 
decker. Joy Brand. 



ZETA IOTA 



Women's Business Honorary 



PSI LAM 




MICRON 



T^ISTINGUISHED women in the field of business are 
^'^ guests on the campus each month under the auspices of 
Zeta Iota, women's business honorary. 

To give women in business administration inspiration and 
intimate knowledge of the professional world, Zeta Iota ar- 
ranges these events primarily for the benefit of the twenty 
members of the honorary. Election to membership is mainly 
on the basis of scholastic achievement. 

A local organization since its beginning eight years ago, 
Zeta Iota is working toward national affiliation soon. Guiding 
this program is President Marian Zapka. Other officers include 
Lois Webb, vice-president; Betty Hess, secretary; and Jean 
DePompei, treasurer. 

Social events on the Zeta Iota calendar were highlighted by 
an evening's entertainment for women students in business 
administration and business education. 



A WOMAN'S place may still be in the home, but to mem- 
■'- ^ bers of Psi Lambda Omicron a home wiU be more than 
the old-fashioned routine of cooking and mending. 

Coeds in the Kent State home economics honorary take part 
in regional conferences which reveal the latest developments 
in specialized fields, such as quantity cookery, textiles, and 
nutrition. 

Good scholarship at home is encouraged by the Psi Lambda 
Omicron award presented each spring to the woman in home 
economics who holds the highest cumulative point average. 
The group also regularly buys a bond, which is added to the 
home ec scholarship fund. A news letter keeps former mem- 
bers in touch with the department and honorary, organized 
in 1940. 

Officers were Norma Jenkins, president; Bonnie Avant, 
secretary; and Joy Brand, treasurer. 



HONORARIES 



218 



First Row: James Wilkins, Anthony Cacioppo, 
James Brainerd, Dean Infield. John Demming. 
Wilbur Thomas. 

Second Row: Ruth Davidson. Becre Dieckmann, 
Grayce Mays. Ruth Hoehn. Wanda Lashley. 
Matilda Davis. Lois Schmotzer, Carolyn 
Adametz. 

Third Row: Professor Clark. Professor Winslow. 
Joseph Howard, Van Darby, Professor Drake, 
Professor Pearce. Jerome Hanzel. Joseph 
Schmiedel, Mary Rehder. Professor Hoose. 



First Row: Peter Brown, James Edwards, Charles 

Lehman, Dean Infield, Dick Limbert, Jim 

Hadley, Bob Kreyssig. 
Second Row: Joyce Bates. Professor Clarence 

Cook. Don Shook. Bill Wolf. Virginia Straight. 

Kenneth Marry. Marilyn Wilms. Toni Mittiga 
Third Row: Earl Ford. Bob Tubaugh, Garnett 

Bird, Mary Misko, Esther Purdy, Betry Hoy 

Jim Butcher, Donald Erlewine. 





T^EEPING up with the ever-advancing field of professional 
-'-^ psychology is the main project of Psi Chi, national hon- 
orary society for majors and minors in psychology. 

Students maintaining a B average in the field are active 
members of the honorary, headed by Betty Dieckmann. Ruth 
Davidson is entertainment and program chairman, with John 
Burgess as secretary-treasurer. Dr. Raleigh M. Drake, depart- 
ment head, is faculty advisor. 

Working in the campus psychology clinic provides prac- 
tical experience for Psi Chi members, who discuss their ex- 
periments and observations at monthly meetings of the hon- 
orary. With a membership of forty-three, the club is one of 
the largest campus honoraries. 

Kent State's chapter of Psi Chi was founded in March of 
1944. Combined with special projects and outstanding pro- 
fessional speakers are annual social events. 



PHI SI 




XI 



TI? VERY major field of interest in the world of science is 
-*-^ covered by activities of Phi Sigma Xi honorary. Ad- 
vancements in chemistry, physics, biology, and mathematics are 
reported and discussed at the group's bi-monthly meetings, 
and specialists in the various fields explain findings of na- 
tionally-known researchers. 

Accomplishments in research and development are brought 
to public attention by open house weeks each spring. Each of 
the four science divisions exhibits its work under the direc- 
tion of the twenty-five members of Phi Sigma Xi. 

After spending hours in the laboratory, students who find 
time to be officers are William Wolf, president; Virginia 
Straight, vice-president; Donald Shook, secretary; and Kenneth 
Marty, treasurer. Faculty advisors, from each department, are 
Professor Clarence Cook, chemistry; Dr. Ralph Dexter, bi- 
ology; and Dr. Foster Brooks, mathematics. 



219 



HONORARIES 




First Row: Chris Arrale, Bill Crory, Joe Dagher. 
DeaQ Infield. 

Second Row: Lucille Hyman, Joy Brand, Esther 
Purdy, Marie Heupel, Charles Mihalka, June 
Derks, Norma Davis, Marion Lemponen. 

Third Row: Janet Weimer, Martha Riley, Naomi 
Moses, Jennie Rocke, Pauline Himelrigh, 
Kathryn Frase, Maria Fiori, Jean Stonescreet, 
Dorothy Waterman. 

Fourth Row: Bob Kreyssig, Professor Ballard 
Brady, Professor Amos Heer, Professor Gerald 
Reed, Professor H. A. Cunningham, Professor 
L. H. Munzenmayer, George Streby, Warren 
Craigo, Loren Hostetler. 



First Row: Professor Gertrude Lawrence, Rella 
Muntean. Dolores Bashline, Barbara Ashby. 
Second Row: Jim Kenski, Robert Lengacher. 




KAPPArDELTA PI PHI AL 



T^OING its part to improve education standards in public 
^^^ schools are members of Kappa Delta Pi, which maintains 
the Delta Beta chapter on campus. Through this national edu- 
cation honorary thirty-seven students and nineteen faculty 
members keep abreast of changes in educational theory and 
practice. 

Kappa Delta Pi recognizes outstanding scholarship in the 
immediate area at its spring Scholarship Tea for students with 
point averages of B plus or better. Lectures throughout the 
year also emphasize methods of attaining top learning ability, 
from the point of view of the teacher as well as of the student. 

Charles Mihalko heads Kappa Delta Pi, with Marie Heupel 
vice-president, and June Derks secretary. Miss Heupel and 
Augustine Cosentino represented the local chapter at the 
biennial national convocation in Atlantic City. 




THETA 



"P EPRESENTATIVES of nine colleges and universities of 
-^*- Ohio, Michigan, and Pennsylvania were guests of the 
KSU Psi Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, national history honor- 
ary, at this winter's regional conference. 

Fundamental plans for the week-end meetings were made by 
club officers Rella Muntean, president; Robert Lengacher, 
vice-president; Barbara Ashby, secretary; and James Kenski, 
treasurer. Dr. Gertrude Lawrence continued her work as ad- 
visor. 

Phi Alpha Theta members are junior and seniors who have 
taken at least eighteen hours of history, with grades of B or 
better. Formed from the local historical society, the Kent State 
chapter was organized in 1938. 

Highlight of the regional conference on campus was the 
luncheon lecture by Dr. Earl Pomeroy, editor of the national 
publication "The Historian." 



HONORARIES 



220 





LUB 



A LL the mystery and colorful excitement of a New 
-^ •*- Orleans Mardi Gras and other traditional dances 
done in disguise was poured into the only original 
campus dance — the Masque Ball. 

Sponsored as an annual project by the Art Club, the 
ball drew human cameras and salt shakers, animals, 
fan dancers, and bewhiskered college professors. 

Adding to the lively atmosphere were the decora- 
tions of Wills Gym which transformed the bare 
brick walls into underground caverns and fish-infest- 
ed pools. 

This wasn't the only decorating job done by Art 
Club members, however. The group's most effective 
contribution to University social activities was the 
dressing of the gym and Moulton Hall music room 



for dances and other special occasions. Drawing from 
a good background of design, color, and construction, 
artists of the campus helped pleasure-seeking students 
to forget that tonight's dance floor would again be a 
tiresome classroom in the morning. 

Talks by prominent persons in the art and busi- 
ness world were featured at weekly Art Club meet- 
ings. Open forums on student work and current out- 
side exhibitions also gave critical students a chance 
to air their views. 

President of the club, open to all students, was Glen 
McFarland. William Pistner was vice-president, 
Richard Pope secretary, and treasurer of the group 
was A. W. Christenson. Forty-one art students and 
enthusiasts were club members this year. 



First Row: Jack Loney, Gene Jagmin, Eugene 

Wollenslegel. 
Second Row: Jeanne Betz, George Husa, Nancy 

King, William Schroedel, Jane Rial. 
Third Row: Jean Miller, Eleanor Zika, Dorothy 

Miller, Mavis Lemmons, Marilyn Kotis. 



First Row: Harlan McGrail, Wallace Kotouch, 
Henry Fusco. 

Second Row: Nancy Pfeil, Richard Pope, Glenn 
McFarland, William J. Pistner, William 
Christenson, Ruthann Shelar. 

Third Row: Joseph Nestich, Ann Irons, Rose- 
mary Grzincic, Professor Robert Morrow, 
Penny Carroll, Naomi Teter, Harry Griffith. 



221 





i: t-^:f- 



^ '^.l 



A. 





Concert Band Personnel: R, Banker, S. Beeman, M. Bitmer, R. Bliss, J. Boettler, J. Bonar, M. Boni, C. Bowers. M. Breih. N. Brister. J. Brode, J. Brown, 
C. Caine. J. Cariofe, J. Chidley, W. Chisholm. V. Costerella, N. Davis. R. DeMattia. R. Dick, J. Dingledine, R. Durst. J. Farinacci, M. Farrell, R. Faulk, R. 
Ferry, W. Fields, J. Fritchley, D. Fullerton, E. Glick, A. Gradolph, H. Greenwald, R. Goodwin, B. Hahn. N. Heiss, A. Hoover, D. Jeffers, V. Kaipainen. V. 
Krause, M. Lemponen, D. Leopold, D. McGinley. L. McMillen. Adelaine Metcalf, Ann Lee Metcalf. W. Palmer, N. Park. C, Parsons, R. Paugh, W. 
Portman, H. Province, C. Questel, D. Quester, M. Reed, G. Ross, D. Schramm. W. Sedlak, D. Shaffer, W. Shuba, P. Simmons, E. Simshauser, R. Smith, D. 
Stanford. W, Striifler. S. Waters, P. West, C. Whitehead, D. Wildman, G. Williams. D. Winkleman. 

CONCERT BAND 




Roy D. Metcalf 

Director 



TOVERS of good band music don't have far to go 
-*— ' when they arrive at the KSU campus. Director 
Roy D. Metcalf and his seventy musicians rehearse 
daily for home concerts and the annual Spring Inter- 
Collegiate Ohio Band Festival. This year the Kent 
State group also performed in Youngstown's Stam- 
baugh Auditorium. 

Max Reed served as president of the ever-growing 
group, assisted by Marion Lemponen, Dorothy Wild- 
man, Don McGinley, and Pat West. 



222 




Orchestra Personnel: C. Arnold, S. Beemaa, M. Birtner, L. Caraperyan. \V. Chisholm, R. Cooley. V. Costarella, N. Davis, R. DeMatna. E. Douglass. 
R. Dovenbarger, J. Farinacci, M. Farrell, R. Faulk, R. Fields. E. Ford. D. Frost. H. Heiss, R. Hoover. D. Infield, J. Jacobs, A. Johnson, L. Jones, H. Kaley. 
A. Kambury, M. Lansinger. M. Peters, C. Questel, D. Quesior, E. Raup, M. Reed, G. Ross, D. Shaffer, R. Sollbereer, D. Stanford. E. Stewart. D. Striffler, J. 
Weber. P. West, G. Westin, C. Whitehead. 



ORCHESTRA 



"DETURN from service of Director Kenneth Byler 
-*-*- brought new life to the Kent State Orchestra, 
as it was merged by the leader with seasoned mu- 
sicians of the local civic group. 

With re-enforcement by faculty and local players, 
the orchestra gave its annual winter concert, com- 
plete with Beethoven's difficult eighth symphony and 
works in the strictly modern vein. A better audience 
than usual was proof that orchestral music can be 
popular with students. 




Kenneth Byler 

Director 



223 



i J 1' 



III 

1 


f| 



Kana, M. Sprott, M. Evelyn, 



First Row: I. Brodbeck, M. Orr, C. HoUingsworth. J. Marshall, K. Carver. C. Taylor, W. Reed, M. Lansinger. C. Shindledecker, D. Swanson, B. Bertram, P. West, 

L. Wagner, B. Fulkerson, J. Douglass, B. Dormady, D. Leopold, R. Sollberger, N. Olson, P. Hruby, F. Faust, M. Alten. 
Second Row: C. Orlikowski, J. Stonestreet. M. Wilber. J. Claypoole, C. Collin, M. White, D. FuUerton, B. Jerles, E. Zika, V. Br 

E. Douglass, K. Prichard, M. Barrett, C. Taylor, J. Button, T. Pugliese, P. Steiner, J. Steiger, B. Lilley, Director Caraperyan. 
Third Row: W. King, P, Snyder, J. Lilley. W. Schenk, A. Carter. S. Dilmore, R. Gamble, C Stewart, R. Stone, R. Patzer, L. Carapetyan, A. Cheney, G. Hennis, F. 

Carioti, C Hall, D. Erdley, B. Gordon, J. Wohlford, D. Hungerford, C. Cook, G. Dormady. 
Fourth Row; R. Jamison. F, Perew. D, Spohrer. G. HoUingsworth. E. Halas, G. Gray. R. Bliss, H. Moore, E. Mitchell, P. Ulrich, W. Rush. C Hildebrecht, J. 

Keefer, D. Sanderson, N. Davis, M. Lenenski, G. Pavalakovich, D. Hermann, J. Weber, J. Brown, G. Gloss. 



A CAPPELLA CHOIR 




T N spite of financial difficulties which curtailed the 
■*- size of potential audiences, the A Cappella Choir 
has achieved heights acclaimed by professional critics 
as unparalleled in college circles. Credit for the pre- 
cise beauty of the choral work went to Director Caro 
M. Carapetyan, himself a perfectionist. 

Concerts in every major northeastern Ohio city 
prepared the way for the completely successful Sever- 
ance Hall program in Cleveland in April. 



Caro M. Carapetyan 

Director 



224 



'npRAINING ground for the professional-caliber A 
Cappella Choir is the University Chorus, under 
the same director as the main group. Caro M. Carape- 
tyan leads both choruses in nearly identical songs, so 
when the beginning voices have reached the choir 
standard students can make the jump without learn- 
ing too much new music at once. 

For the first time the chorus had a part in a regular 
choir program. Beginning voice students sang two 
classical compositions at the beginning of the main 
Easter program. 

Working with only ten voices. Director Carapetyan 
also leads the first Kent State madrigal chorus. Prac- 
tice sessions are held with singers seated around a 
table, and music goes back to the days of traveling 
musicians who improvised as they walked throughout 
Europe. 

The madrigal singers took part in the spring choir 
concert in the auditorium. 



First Row: Marjorie Barrett. Maxine Evelyn, Marjorie Sproct, Barbara Lilley, 

Irene Brodbeck. 
Second Row: Professor Carapetyan, Mary Ann Maske, Donald Sanderson, 

Roland Patzer, Peter Ulrich, Gordon Dormady. 



MADRIGAL SINGERS 
UNIVERSITY CHORUS 



First Row: Carolyn Bean, Anita Hicks, Gwen Clough, Jeanette Wair/. 

Aurelia Adams, Thelma Waddell, Dora Ruckle, Patricia Petersen, Rutli 

Paul, Catherine Furlno, Helen Shuff. 
Second Row: Lois Pondy, Roberta Wedewen, June Griffin, Jean Klasgye. 

Alice Teeple. Anne Blackwelder. Rita Hare, Mary Dulaney. Jacqueline 

Widdows, Ethel Shearer, Frances Deetz. 
Third Row: Mary Hoose. Carole Petti, Berry Anderson, Joe Babka, Ray 

Christopherson, Addison Reed, Norman Snyder, Gene McKinney, Dorothy 

Reit, Maryann Hubbard, Joan Aardwell. Barbara Eicher. 
FOLRTH Row: Professor Carapetyan, Roland Hummer. Neil Heiss, John 

Flint, Wilfred Cheetham, Ben Cotton. George E. Grant, Clarence Watts, 

John Paulson. Emery Dzamka. Frank Trenta, Rudy Schuster, James Cum- 

mings. 



225 




MUSIC CLUB 



"P EPLACING the old music honorary, a new general music 
-*-*- club open only to majors and minors was formed this 
winter with a nucleus of forty-six potential professional mu- 
sicians. 



Charles Whitehead was president, Pat West vice-president, 
Jo Anne Harvey secretary, Martha Lansinger treasurer, and 
William Evans sergeant-at-arms. 

Record parties and open recitals were arranged and given 
by Music Club members. Advisors were Professors Kenneth 
Byler and Harold Miles. 




PIRST Row: C. Parsons, J. Lilley, R. Faulk, N. Snyder, 

L. Burkes, W. Evans, W. Portman. 
Second Row: D. FuUerton, B. Bertram, W. Chisholm. 

J. Harvey, C. Whitehead, P. West, R. DeMattia. M. 

Lansinger, D. Leopold. 
Third Row: J. Brand, H. Greenwald, C. Shindledecker, 

D. Stanford, A. Hoover, J. Chidley, S. Beeraan, R. 

Patzer, B. Hahn, M. Lenenski, C. Questel, N. Davis, 

D. W'ildman, H. Heiss, J. Fiocca. 



First Ro^s■: J. Marshall, C. Schipchik, C Scerback, J. 

Georgiadis, L. Lindsey, A. Fornshell. 
Second Ro>x-: W. Moore, Professor B. Mikofsky, J. 

Nemeth, V. Pogorzelski, S. Dudra, J. Musyt, S. Nestor. 
Third Row: J. Hunka, G. Rybak, D. Tomanovich, H. 

Mianowski, E. Grendel, J. Wasil, F. Faust, P. Zusky. 



AT ZITH the addition of Russian to the foreign languages 
' ' taught on campus, the Russian Arts Club was formed in 
1946 to develop appreciation of Russian music, art, ballet, and 
general culture. 

When the Don Cossack Chorus sang at KSU, the club pre- 
sented Serge Jaroff and his singers with a scroll in recognition 
of their work to aid Russo-American feeling. 



Victor Pogorzelski was president, aided by Al Zetts, William 
Moore, June Nemeth, and Mary Smerek. Bernard Mikofsky 
was faculty advisor of the new group. 



RUSSIAN 
ARTS CLUB 



226 



TV'ENT STATE UNIVERSITY this winter was granted a 
-*-^ chapter of the national Society for the Advancement of 
Management, as the first big step toward nation-wide recog- 
nition of the nine management curricula. 

Known as the Management Association of KSU, the nine- 
teen members of the group are drawn from upperclass men in 
the field. With Professor Francis Mull as advisor, officers in- 



MANAGEMENT 
ASSOCIATION 



eluded President Milan Jaksic, Robert Rector, Bernard Sharkey, 
Jack Hurowitz. Martin Juhn, Fred Green, and John Dan, Jr. 



First Row: R. Cohen, H. Johnson, H. Speck, L. Di- 

Nuoscio, G. Swift. 
Second Row: F. Green, R. Rector, Professor F. Mull, 

M. Jaksic, M. Juhn, J. Hurowitz. 
Third Row: J. Demming, M, Barrett, B. Sharkey, J. 

Dan, Jr., D. Clough, A. Skoulis. 



First Row: Mearle Eisenhart, William Seese, Dale Bal- 

Jenger, Richard Davis, Richard Ashley. 
Second Row: Gerald Beeman, Wilbur Beal, William 

Kaskey, Ray Rush, Donald White. 
Third Row: Owen Swanson, Carl Jordan, Jay Brown. 

Russell Gray, Richard Wolfe, Clayton George, Richard 

Kleinhans, Willis Richardson. 




ANOTHER new organization added to the KSU roster this 



i\ 



year is the Square and Compass Club, comprised exclu- 



sively of campus members of the Masonic Order. 

SQUARE AND 
COMPASS CLUB 



President William Caskey presides over the fifty members, 
with officers Ray Rush, Donald White, Gerald Beeman, How- 
ard Gregory, and Wilbur Beal. 

Bi-weekly meetings featured guest speakers at the luncheon 
conferences, with other social events including picnics and 
hayrides. The group was formed in May, 1947, and the con- 
stitution approved in November. 



227 




First Row: Jean Guncher, Dean Ada V. Hyatt, Virginia Block, Margaret Boone. Second Row: Marion Lemponen, Ann Irons, Bon- 
nie Jean Avant. Eliziibech Haggerty, Shirley Edwards. 



WOMEN'S LEAGUE 



As a co-sponsor of the style parade. Women's League helped 
keep campus co-eds in contact with "new look" demands. 
The male presidents of university organizations were guests 
at a banquet in March sponsored by Men's Union. 




T7VERY -woman on campus is represented through the 
-' — ' Women's League, made up of members of each coed or- 
ganization. 

With its brother group. Men's Union, the League co-spon- 
sors Pork Barrel, the annual skit competition. Other big events 
under Women's League supervision are the Big-Little Sister 
Tea for freshmen women, held early in the Fall, and the senior 
women's banquet each May. A spring formal and fashion 
show also were given by the service league this year. 

Special problems concerning Kent State coeds are brought 
to the attention of Student Court, conducted by Women's 
League. 

Jean Goncher was acting president this year, -with "Virginia 
Block as vice-president, Margaret Boone secretary, and Phyllis 
Robbins treasurer. 




First Row: William Byrne, Dean Raymond E. Manchester, Robert Duncan, Robert Farnbworth, Wallace Krivoy. Second Rov:': 
Tom Welsh, Jolin Wolcott, William Crory, Dominic Polumbo, Jim O'Brien, Patrick Patron, Ted Trask, Paul Snyder. 



MEN'S UNION 



'T~'HOUSANDS of students and alumni cram the auditorium 
-*- for the annual Pork Barrel; but as they enjoy themselves 
from the audience's viewpoint few spectators realize the back- 
stage work which goes into each individual skit. 

Planning of rehearsals, the final program, judges, and other 
infinitesimal details is done by Women's League and the men's 
corresponding group, Men's Union. 

Robert Duncan, Men's Union president, and his group of 
officers led the way in Pork Barrel plans in which nearly four 
hundred students took part. Ordering and presenting of 
trophies were also in the hands of the MU. 

In addition to this one big affair. Men's Union tries to offer 
advice to freshmen when asked, and regulates the few rulings 
applicable to male students. An annual dinner each spring 
awards outstanding service to KSU. 





First Row: Tom Davey, Curt Sarff, Betty Jean Keck, Philip Dempsey, Jean Goncher, Isla Schnauffer, Clarence Strader. Joseph McCabe, Anne Domiter. 
Matilda Davis. Ted Trask, Nancy Reddrop. SECOND Row: Phyllis Robbins, Clarence Peoples, Roy Newsome, Sally Koch, John Gressard, Robert Duncan. 
Robert Wentz, William Shuttleworth. 



Assembly committee of the council was responsible for the appearance of such 
noted speakers as William HoUiday. president of Standard Oil Company. 



Bobby Sherwood and his orchestra came to Wills Gym for the traditional Top 
Hop presented by the social committee of Student Council. 




COUNC 




PTUDENT COUNCIL, under the leadership of Thomas 
^ Davey, president, this year attempted not only to cement 
relations among various student-faculty committees, but to 
strengthen the ties of Kent State with schools in surrounding 
counties. 

During the year the group was called upon to intercede in 
the Radio Workshop dispute, the problem of a $1,500 surplus 
in allocating funds, and the matter of late hour permits for 
women on campus. 

Traditional campus elections, such as Miss Kent State, Most 
Popular, and Council elections themselves, also were handled 
during the year. Robert Duncan, SC vice-president, was at the 
head of the elections committee. 



Matilda Davis served as secretary, Jean Goncher represented 
the group on Allocations Committee and acted as treasurer, 
and Roy Newsome handled the duties of the chairman of the 
social committee. 

Constitutional inadequacies, often the cause of confusion in 
student government, came up for discussion, although no con- 
crete action was taken toward revision. 

Toward the end of the year contact with the University of 
Akron was established, and several joint activities planned, 
with an eye toward heralding a new era of inter-campus friend- 
ship. 

Council meetings continued to draw student interest to one 
of the most independent college government systems. 



230 



First Row: Terry Pugliese, Martha Lansinger, 
Doris Heupel, William Hugo. 

Second Row: Harlan McGrail, Ruth Hoehn, 
Jean Goncher, Patricia West, Phyllis Robbins. 
Wallace Krivoy. 

Third Row; Jim Bullock. Warren Lashley, Rich- 
ard Stover, Robert Magee. 




T TNIVERSITY organizations receiving funds from 
^^ student activity fees all are represented on the 
Allocation Committee, the branch of student govern- 
ment which handles finances. Martha Lansinger is 
chairman of the group and Doris Heupel secretary. 
Each quarter the committee distributes available 
funds among the departments. The amount usually is 
well over $20,000. 



AN entirely new organizational system has made 
-^ ^ the Inter-Religious Council vital to Kent State 
this year, by bringing local ministers closer to student 
members of their churches. 

Twenty-one representatives on the Council meet 
bi-monthly and work regularly in aiding Reverend 
Donald Barss and Reverend Laten Carter in their 
student ministerial chores. 

Robert White heads the Council and Maxine 
Evelyn is secretary of the co-ordinating group. 




ALLOCATION 
COMMITTEE 



TER-RELIGIOUS 
COUNCIL 




First Row: Myron Pearson, Richard Scholle. 
Charles Smith, Jack Hague, Richard Hunger- 
ford, John Flint, Carl Blackburn, Tom Spencer 

Second Row: Rev. Donald E. Barss, Rev. Laten 
Carter. Elizabeth Raup, Robert White, Maxine 
Evelyn, Thelma Waddell, Dr. Joseph Politella, 
Rev. Forest Bond. 

Third Row: Jean Milford, Ruth Ellen Myers, 
Joan Schilhng, Virginia Gilcrest, Elmer 
Cauphin, Jack Wendelken, June Hirka, Violet 
Miller, Marian King, Rebecca Taylor, Joyce 
Marshall. 




231 




Three couples take time out from dancing and tlie eacs 
table to discuss possibilities of another mixer in the spring. 



YM prexy Bob White gets everyone in a lively mood while 
giving out with one of the latest hits. His audience looks 
happy, so it couldn't have been too bad! 



Still jumpin' at the close of the evening were >targe an 
Doris. Maybe Cal's piano music in the background ha 
something to do with it. 




First Row: M. Weiss, J. Thomas, W. Harmon, B. Strauss, B. Herman. 

Second Row: F. Howard, M. Bamberger, J. Cook, E. Kneblewicz, H. Garrison, C. 

Vogt, M. Hangar. 
Third Row: .T. Piddington, p. Almsbe.-g, J. Barnum, G. Bird. H James, .T. Schillint; 




Q YMBOLIC of the universal good-will they foster 
^ is the coordinated work of the campus chapters 
of the Young Men's and Young Women's Christian 
Associations. 

Although the groups have separate rosters of of- 
ficers, they work together in promoting spiritual and 
devotional meetings. Rosemary Morris heads the 
YWCA, with Robert White as YM president. 

The men's group meets every two months for com- 
bination business-social-spiritual meetings, while the 
coed group holds weekly sessions. These are occu- 
pied by special projects, including writing to stu- 
dents in foreign lands and collecting used greeting 
cards for children's hospitals. An appreciation tea 
was given for faculty wives and professors who 
contributed funds to send delegates to the Geneva 
conference in Wisconsin. 

Benefits to both the YM and YW have accumu- 
lated from their generous cooperation. 



R. Morris 



First Row: Mrs. R. White, Professor Hi 

H. Hungerford. 
Second Row: L. Taylor, S. Edwards, V. Berger. B. Avant 

^\'ahl, T. Kiasgye. 
Third Row: B. Bender. M. Kennell, .7. Shaffer, I. Trembly, J. Widdows 



Professor Robbins, Mrs. 
Gilcrest, M. Parz- 



First Row: M Johnson, P. Mikula, M. Shingler, A, Hamilton. R. Myers. 

Second Row: A. Eschler, M. Engren. E. Brown. M. Qeaton. E. Tucker, E, Young, 
(unidentified), A. Godfrey, E. Scherer, J. Stonestreet. J. Crawford, D. Clink- 
scales. 

Third Row: L. Williamson. M. Pinkerton, V. Lapole, C. Kline, M. Timmerman, 
M. Black, J. Miller, M. Airman. M. Karancanes, M. Immler. 



232 



CHRISTIAN FOUNDATION 



T MPROVED evidence of good Christian fellowship on the 
-*■ campus may be attributed to efforts of officers and mem- 
bers of the Christian Foundation. 

Jack Hague was president of the Foundation, which has as 
its headquarters the Kent Christian Church. Maxine Evelyn 
was vice-president, Harry Higley treasurer, and Lois Webb 
secretary. 

Weekly meetings are open to all campus students, and t.ike 



the form of religious discussions and worship services. Area 
ministers are often guests of the Foundation and take part in 
convocations. 

Although the Christian Foundation was inactive during the 
war, the addition of the Reverend A. Laten Carter to the group 
as official advisor put the religious club back "on its feet." The 
minister is one of two pastors available on campus for con- 
sultation at any time. 



Christian Foundation co-sponsored the flower 
booth which won first place for them in the 
independent category of the Penny Carnival 
contest. 



Looicing through the Bible while preparing a 
Sunday service. Reverend Reed points out a 
pertinent passage. Working with him are Kay 
Pritchard, Robert Sollberger, Paul Alden, and 
Leslie Blanchard. 




First Row: Joyce Marshall. Joseph Fisher, 
Leslie Blanchard, Rhode Ginter. 

Second Rov;': Roberta Sollberger. George 
Czech, Lois Webb. Jack Hague, Maxine 
Evelyn, Harrv Higley, Ruth Ossman. 

Third Row: Kay Pritchard, Paul Alden. 
Robert Sollberger, William Higgins, Rev- 
erend A. Laten Carter, Dorothy Cross. 



NEWMAN CLUB 



T)UTTING to active use the strong fraternal feel- 



r 



ing among Catholic students on campus, the New- 



man Club grew this year as it continued to promote 
this feeling of brotherhood within the religion. 

Roy Newsome was president of the several hundred 
Newman Club members, who met bi-weekly at the 
local church of their faith for short worship services 
and social affairs. Two formal dances highlighted the 
year, as they began and ended the academic season 
cheerfully. 



News of approaching meetings and personal items 
among club members was spread through the columns 
of the Newmanite, monthly newspaper. In addition 
to its insertion in the mail box of each member, the 
paper was mailed to .liumni. Kenny Haina was the 
Newmanite editor. 

Serving with Newsome on the executive board 
were Frank Zima, vice-president; Kathryn Hosfeld, 
secretary; and Richard EUers, treasurer. 




First RO* : A, DiClaudio, ]. Rocko. J. Cook, 

E. Sercelj. P. Moran, H. Frederick. .T. 

Beckman. B. Davidson. M. Smerek. T. 

Pugliese. 
Second Row : R. Giannamore, M. Abood. C. 

Coco, G. Kacarab. A. Mangione. E. Pore. 

R. Fuerher. ' unidentified ) . A. Allele. 
Third Row : A. Fregley, G. Hannigan. T. D:- 

Cola. F. Kase. jVI. DelVecch o. A. Tauss. 

J. Laurenson. R, Perme, G. Birchick. 



First Row : C. Callahan. 1. Maniino. J. Lais. 

M. Alien. P. Bowden. B. Buckley. V. Car- 

raher, M. Sawder, K, Kaliszewski. R. 

Crawford. 
Second Row: A. Rohaley, D. Strayer. T. 

Prebish, G. Ryan, T. Drouillard. R. 

Dzurec. F. Trenra, I. Schraiedl. F. Kromar. 
Third Row: M. Madigan. C. Calucci. M. 

Bissler. T. Barnum, R. Fiori. A. Riccuti. 

V. Harrinccon. J. Cahill. M. Buhcr. 



First Row: A. Bilanycli, M. Fitzgerald. M. 

DeScenna, C Petit, K. Hosfeld. R. EUers, 

F. Zima. R. Newsome. Professor Altmann. 

Father Koch, R. Gregor, B. DiBartolo. J, 

Horning. M. Hoose. 
Second Row": M. Fiori, A. Domiter. A. Mit- 

tiga, E. McGinley, S. Gatti. R. Carboni. H. 

Divney, (unidentified), (unidentified), F. 

Belgan. L. May, R. Kress, G. O'Toole, R. 

Schrader, (unidentified), M. Boyle. G. 

Donnelly, C. Orlikowski. 
Third Row: K. Haina, L. Spinetti, N. Ven- 

etta. (unidentified). B. Suhavda. (un- 
identified). P. Matthews, L. Colby, W. 

ShaelTer, (unidentified), G. Jagmin. J. 

Lapunka, B. Petit. F. DePasquale. E. 

Szalma. L. Motley. 



234 



WESLEY FOUNDATION 



'T^WO hundred Protestant students participate ac- 
■*- tively in affairs sponsored by the Wesley Foun- 
dation, with its home in the Kent Methodist Church. 
Harold Province heads the cabinet, with officers 
Myron Pearson, Violet Miller, and William Hugo 
aiding Minister Donald E. Barss in planning events. 
As a member of the Ohio Methodist Student Move- 
ment the KSU Wesley group was represented at state 
and national conferences. 



A Leap Year Carnival-Dance at the end of Febru- 
ary was the main social event, although each weekly 
meeting ended in a social hour. Needy children and 
families in Kent and throughout Europe were aided 
by Wesley contributions, all fuUy reported in the 
chapter newspaper. National fraternities for Metho- 
dist men and coeds were begun through Wesley. 



Audrey and Janice do a bir of fast salesmanship at 
their "Golden Earrings" booth. The jewelry was 
made by Kappa Phi coeds. 



Reverting to their second childhood are these 
Wesleyites, complete with l<)n\pnpv .md teddy 



Mary Altman and Cecelia Elson go through a for- 
tune telling seance, although neither coed seems 
\ery convinced about the whole thine. 





Top Slater editors conferring with Fall editor Robert 
Lengocher, seated, ore Morion Cole, John Finn, 
Robert Weymueller, and Robert, Wentz, 



236 



AS the only Ohio newspaper published four times 
-^ ^ weekly from a campus the size of KSU, the 
Daily Kent Stater required nearly full-time work by 
a staff of dozens of workers in order to maintain the 
standard of complete coverage. 

Three editors took over the Stater reins this year, 
replacing the two who formerly worked under the 
old semester plan. Robert Lengacher headed the 
campus daily during the Fall, followed by John Finn, 
Winter, and Robert Casey, Spring. 

Front page news and make-up men varied from 
term to term, with Robert Weymueller, Robert 
Wentz, Marion Cole, Larry Vitsky, and Donald Koer- 
lin putting in the most time in the "slot." Society 
editors included Gloria Sherrets, Betty Rowlen, Jeanne 
Wolfe, and Eleanor Meek. 

Sports fans often saw the by-lines of sports editors 
George Heaslip, AI Weekley, and Bill Schlemmer. 



Carol Hart did most of the reporting of political af- 
fairs, with Al Post handling many features. Miss Cole 
was music-theater critic. 

Routine of "putting the paper to bed" continued 
as it had for many years, with a new set of editors 
and reporters handling each day's news almost before 
it happened. A crew of copy boys "ran" news ma- 
terial between the Merril Hall office and the down- 
town print shop, and it was late at night before each 
final inky page proof was pulled. 

Business Manager William Hugo served for two 
terms with Angeline Scourcos taking over in the 
spring as the first post-war woman business head. 
With a separate staff of advertising and circulation 
managers they kept the paper in the black. 

The Kent Stater again took honors at the Ohio 
Scholastic Press Association, and was represented at a 
national conference in the Fall. 




237 



I 



f \ 



■■THE 1948 



Editor Frank Corioli, Jr., finishes layouts for the 1948 Chestnut Burr's 288 pages. 

Robert Kidd looks on as Chief Photoorapher Richard Arnold gi'es John Stage's faculty 
portroit shots the once-over. 




CHESTNUT BURR 



A SMALL, compact staff trained at consistently uniform 
writing and photography "made" this year's Chestnut 
Burr, which boasts the highest number of pages yet published 
as a Kent State yearbook. 

Starting early in the Spring of 1947, Editor Frank Carioti, 
Jr., and his business manager, Robert Magee, plotted general 
section lay-outs and deadlines as they consulted with national- 
ly-known printers and engravers before letting the expensive 
contracts. 

First associate editor in several years was Marion Cole, who 
handled all copy and was general production manager. Harlan 



McGrail was held over from last year's Burr as art editor, and 
Richard Arnold headed the photo crew. John Stage did most 
of the portrait photography. 

Audrie Fornshell handled the highlights section, with 
Eleanor Meek doing classes, Philip Dempsey, sports, and Anne 
Domiter, the Greek Section. John Laurenson and David Kap- 
lan worked on the business side, bringing in advertising reve- 
nue. 

Burr staff members received awards at the annual Publi- 
cations Banquet, shared with the Stater staff. 




General staff members included Sue Lieberman, Burr Secretary Stella Trautz, Shirley Morks, Marion Del Vecchio, and Lee Sproat. 



Roger fiaele, Gordon Goldsinith, Doris Carpenter, and Ernest Rowland held staff positions as general ptiotographers. 



FOURTH E STAT 



SELF-APPOINTED publicity agents for the School of Jour- 
nalism are the members and officers of the Fourth Estate, 
local club for journalists patterned on the national group of 
newspaper writers. 

Working directly under Professor William D. Taylor, 
School Head, Fourth Estate officers included Robert Wentz, 
president, Larry Vitsky, Eleanor Meek, and Dan Oana. All of 
the three hundred journalism majors automatically belonged 
to the group and participated in group projects. 

In conjunction with their mission as a service group. 



members of the Fourth Estate acted as volunteer ushers and 
general helpers at the annual Short Course in News Photog- 
raphy during Spring vacation, and did a similar job at the 
June sessions for public relations executives. A representative 
of the group was chairman of the annual Northeastern Ohio 
Scholastic Press Clinic which attracted high school journalists. 
An executive committee did most of the planning, as mem- 
bers of each campus publication met with Fourth Estate of- 
ficers to foster good fellowship within the school. 




240 



STUDENTS with nationality backgrounds from the Orient, 
Russia, India, Greece, and every other major country of the 
world discuss their problems openly at meetings of the Inter- 
national Relations Club. 

Founded during the war years when people were afraid to 
discuss these nationality questions openly, the club continues 
to draw nearly fifty members to authoritative lectures and 
debates. 



INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS CLUB 



Isabel Lee is president. John Furrer, Alice Danyluke, and 
Myron Pearson are other officers. 



First Row: M. Gilbert, C. Fisher, H. Koby, R. Howard, 
Second Row: Professor R, Keor, J, Painter, W. Lashley, 

J. Cook. Professor J. HoliQ. 
Third Row: M. Pugh, ^W, Davis, W, Lashley, D. GrilSn, 

B. Cibula, N, Benellotti. H. Mitrovka, 



First Row: R. Miller, S. Sumergrad, W, Schroedcl. F. 
Calvary. H, Kailan, E. Mills. 

Second Row: T, Crawford, M, Pearson, A. Danyluke, 
J. Furrer, I, Lee, B. Abbott, V. Kaipainen, V, Kasik. 

Third Row: T. Crawford, W, Heintz. M. Bamberger, F. 
Reynolds, Dr, W. Meinke, R. Davis, R. Hughes, Y. 
Tomashiro- 

FOURTH Row: P. Mikula, C, Nairn, R. Gerdon. J. Beck- 
man, C Dover, J, Derks, M. Martin, I. Palama, M 
Kovatly. 




TJOST at the 1948 Buckeye Debate Tournament, largest 
-*- -^ Ohio speech contest, was the KSU Student Forensic 
Association, connected with the School of Speech. 



FORENSIC CLUB 



Exhibition debates in area high schools and Ohio inter- 
collegiate events were sponsored by the local group, headed 
by student forensics director Warren Lashley. Women mem- 
bers of the debate team won first place in their division of the 
Ohio Conference in December. 

Other events attended were Grand National Debate Tour- 
nament in Virginia and the national honorary tourney. 



241 




First Row: Roger Howard. Martha Lansinger. Margaret Prentiss, Margaret B-)vle, 
Second Row: Professor Sauers. David Kaplan, Vernon Lockert. Frank Abbott, 
Warren Lashley, Dan Oana. 



Carolyn Collins holds the attention of several ISA members at a social gathering after 
one of the Monday night meetings. 



ONLY group devoted exclusively to activities for non- 
Greeks is the Independent Students Association, headed 
for the majority of the year by Roger Howard. 

In spite of a nuiBber of political upsets, the ISA managed 
to put three members in the class presidents' chairs and sev- 
eral others in Student Council. Political chairman was David 
Kaplan, and other officers included Warren Lashley, vice- 
president, Margaret Boyle, secretary, and Verne Lochert, treas- 



Unusual Fall decorations by Ruthann Shelar helped make 
the "Aummn Nocturn" dance a success the last week in Oc- 
tober. Equally popular was the "Holiday Prelude" pre-Christ- 
mas dance which highlighted the Winter term's social ac- 
tivities for independent students. , 

Professors did a turn-about for the ISA-sponsored Faculty 
Smnt Night, as once-dignified instructors put on slapstick 
and dance skits in the Hub. ISA also kept the Hub decorated 
throughout the year as one of its projects. 




ISA committee members put notices of election candidates 
into independent students' mailboxes. 



Eileen and Peg concentrate hart^on an after-meeting bridge 
game as their partners check the score. 



The way to a man's heart is through his stomach, they 
say. so ISA members are kept well fed at one of the 
informal parties. The gals seem to be doing okay, too. 




BOOSTER CLUB 



SETTLING down to serious business after the in- 
itial frenzy of membership drives and publicity 
campaigns, the Booster Club spent an active Fall ar- 
ranging for transportation of members to off-campus 
games. 

The remainder of the year, after the close of the 
football season, was taken up with special events 
sponsored by the Boosters to foster more interest and 
spirit in campus varsity athletics. 



A twenty per cent membership increase over last 
year was registered as the total reached 1,200 mem- 
bers. Main financial event was a benefit boxing match, 
which netted more than S500. Half the profits went 
to the Stadiimi Fund. 

Al Weekley was Booster president. Officers in- 
cluded Joan McDermott, Sallie Wheeler, Sam Dudra. 



First Row: Sue Liebermann, Arihur Kambury, 
Candy Ziiia, Philip Dempsey. Janice Galloway. 

Second Row: Joseph Friedman, Angeline Scour- 
cos, Tracy DeForest, Barbara Henry, Salvatore 
Gatti, Suzanne Burns, Al Lumsden. 



OFFICERS 
First Ro».': Sally Wheeler, Alvin Weekley. 
Second Rove: Sam Dudra, Joan McDermott. 



First Row: Mickey Dover. 

Second Row: Joan McDermott, Robert White, 
Roy Newsome. 



First Row: Leonard Dochus, Norman Snyder, 
William Barth, visitor, Richard Brunner, David 
Dorenbach. 

Second Row: Margaret Brown. Clarence Fields, 
Roberta Wedewen, Donald Dorenbach, Janet 
Sanow, Gracia Rogers, Shirley Lees. 

Third Row: Mickey Gerdon, Anita Hicks, Betty 
Davidson, Doris Carpenter, visitor, Mary Wel- 
ler, Carole Petti, Gene Becliman, Nancy Pence. _ 



243 




First Row: Adelle Covaulc, June James. Margaret Pinkerton, Betty Stewart, Norma Davis, Eileen Smith, Beverly Jenkins, Mary Lou Fouts, Gloramae Witt. 

Second Row: Gilberta Sawyer, Eiva Younker, Louise Combus, Margaret Timmerman. Carol Klein, Marian Cleaton, Dorothy Cross, Ada Lee Herbert, Ethel Cunningham. Dorothy Kneu- 

buehl. Marilyn Griffon. Margaret Bodolay. 
Third Row: Ann Di Claudio, Betty Buckley, Francis Rigel, Barbara Henry, Doris White, Ruth Jean George, Jean Koderna. Jean Barnum. Virginia Lepole, Martha Shingler, Helen 

James, Ethel Szojak. 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION CLUB 



QERVING special interests of men and women in the ele- 
^ mentary education field is the club of that name, founded 
in 1941. Related subjects are thoroughly discussed at monthly 
meetings, and speakers included well-known area educators as 
well as members of the faculty. 

President Eileen Smith headed the officers, who were 
Beverly Jenkins, Norma Davis, and Betty Stewart. Miss Susan 
Koehler was faculty advisor. 

Dean Robert I. White spoke at the February dinner which 
highlighted the year's social activities. 



/^^NE of the oldest departmental clubs still continuing worth- 
^^ while projects for Kent State and for the community is 
the Kindergarten-Primary education group, which does a 
double job in aiding local school teachers as well as students 
intending to enter the field of beginning education. 

With Miss Hazel Swan, department head, as advisor, the 
K-P club was headed the majority of this year by Rae Ellen 
Lohrke. Students volunteered as recreation leaders in local 
schools and joined a national K-P group. 



KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY CLUB 



First Row: Martha Chalfanc, Annette Boone, June Welshans. Ruth Ann Gallagher. Joanne Mannino. Josephine Ferrell. Carol Johnson, Joan Gebhardt. Joan Sehringer. Rae Ellen Lohrke, 
Jean Stonestreet, Professor G. Hazel Swan, Kathryn Frase, Mary Jane Blackwell, Betty Crisp, Evelyn Fellows, Peggy Brown, Dorothy Pickett, Connie Anderson. 

Second Row: Nancy Reddrop. Doris Branco. Janell Wise, Violet Miller, Genevieve Messik, Evelyn Burt. Mary Lou Sheets, Dorothy Hopkins, Patsy Kreysig. Frances Morgan. Carolyn Shupp. 
Florence Baker. June Griffen. Alyce Godfrey, Mary Roberts. Dorothy Waterman. Dorothy White, Fay OBryant, Anne Eshler. Patricia McCHster, Doris McPherson, Sylvia Steiner, Cather- 
ine Mulhearn, Elaine White. Peggy Johnson, Gwen Croxton. Phoebe Steiner. Aletha Siringel. 

Third Row: lona Chambers, Carol \\'eltner Gretchen Radar Barbara Truelo\e Dorothy Kline. Betty Russell, Barbara Berg, Mary Lou Holland, June Wilder, Rose Ann Mason, Jean Davidson. 
Mary Moher. Ruth Paul, Barbara Eicher Anne Zucker Joanne Molhcar Peggy Bennet. Mary Lou Radak, Mary Lou McCaskey, Barbara Clark, La Verne Santa, Evelyn Wiegand. Jean 
Anderson, Margaret Hissem, Ruth Flemmg Becky Cull>, Ellen Tucker Harriet Hollamby. 




^^WlA 




N^V--*. 




Wm 



HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 



QERVICE is the keynote of the Home Economics 
^ Club, responsible this year for collecting toys at 
an annual Christmas dinner and donating them to 
the Child Welfare Association in Kent. 

Open to majors, minors, and all students taking 
home economics courses, the club served refresh- 
ments periodically to Delta Sigma Pi and treated the 
Fred Waring troupe with coffee during their Novem- 



ber visit to the campus. Each Fall a "buddy" picnic 
is opened to new members. 

Bonnie Jean Avant was president, Edna Brown 
vice-president, Janet Harmon second vice-president. 
Abigail Dickerson recording secretary, Florence Con- 
verse corresponding secretary, and Nancy Warnock 
treasurer. Faculty advisors were Professors Alice 
Haley and Elizabeth Moomaw Cramer. 



First Row: Maxine Bricker, Bonnie Strauss, 
Renna Melhuish. Gwen Szylagi , Norma 
Jenkins, Ethel Johnson, Julia Evans. 

Second Row: Fern Fehndrich, Patricia Mil- 
ler. Lois Pondy, Shirley Lees, Edna More- 
house, Alice Stephens, Margaret SawTer. 

Third Row: Irene Tryon, Sarah Johnson, 
Arlene Nelson. Carole Petti. Kathryn Wil- 
liams. Gerrie Gord, Alice Jones, Carol 
Shindledecker. 



An outdoor dinner certainly helps solve the 
problem of who is to wash the dishes — you 
can burn these plates. 



The photographer had a hard time keeping his 
mind on his camera, what with the odor of 
roast turkey, hot biscuits, and mashed pota- 
toes giWng him the true Thanksgiving spirit 
before a club dinner. 



First Row: Marilyn Klotis, Nancy Heckman. 
Joan Piddington, Alice Kasaback, Joan 
Warden, Margaret Kelsey. 

Second Row: Florence Converse, Abigail 
Dickerson, Nancy Warnock. Janet Har- 
mon, Edna Brown, Bonnie Jean Avant. 

Third Row: Elaine Kaupinen, Marilyn 
Morey, Bess Constant! ne, Marjorie Mel- 
rose, Ethel Manfrass, Marjorie Engren, Pro- 
fessor Elizabeth Moomaw Cramer. 



245 





First Rove: Nancianne Martin. Kay Baukas. 

Pac Maglione. Marie Heupei, EieaQore 

Knebiewicz, Betvf Faulds. 
Second Row: Martha Bissler. Patricia Bow- 

deti, Mary Jolinson, Shirley Drake, Betty 

Reddrop, Georgia Kennedy. 
Third Row: Connie Marion. Mary Ikerman, 

Grace Flemming, Loretta Postlethwaite, 

June Ralph, Jeanette "VC'altz. 



First Row : Kathleen Hosfeld. Alice Watson, 
Betty Vey. Barbara King. Elizabeth Steve. 

Second Row: Elizabeth Robinson, Mary 
Panasak, Doris Wilkes, Miriam Pugh, 
Marge Ennis. 

Third Row: Mary Burton, Mary Roberts, Pro- 
fessor Seidel, Dolly Potts, .tane Lais. De- 
lores Kne. 



WOMEN 



^Ul^H L ^^C ^ Xv^ 



"T? ARLY this Spring dozens of high-school-age girls swarmed 
■*— ' out of school busses and into Wills Gymnasium. Unlike 
most visitors to the campus, these newcomers weren't dressed 
for a tea or a dance, for most of the youngsters wore shorts or 
slacks, and had their hair well tied back by ribbons. 

These were the several hundred guests of the Women's 
Athletic Association, and they were on the campus for the 
annual Play Day. This one-day event has for years been credi- 
ted with bringing more women into the Kent State H.P.E. 
department than any other single factor. 

Not all emphasis is on future students, however. One of the 
biggest goals in any athletic coed's life is a K letter and a gold 
W.A.A. pin. From the day they enter the University many 



women work constantly summer and winter to gather enough 
points for the awards. 

Tournaments lasting an entire quarter emphasize swimming, 
modern dancing, badminton, volleybaU, tennis, bowling, 
basketball, and archery. 

Betty Vey is president of the 225 W.A.A. members. Her 
cabinet includes Alice Jean Watson, Pat Maglione, Jeanne 
Armitage, and Barbara King. 

Kent State's W.A.A. group is nationally affiliated with the 
Athletic Federation of College Women. The local group meets 
every two weeks, and a co-recreational play-night highlights 
the season's social activities. 



HEALTH AND 



HPE CLUB 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



/^NE of the largest departmental clubs in the school is the 
^^^ Health and Physical Education group, which boasts a 
minimum membership of nearly 150 students. 

Main function of the H.P.E. club is to provide opportunities 
for students to participate in athletic activities outside of 
regularly scheduled class periods. Special afternoons and eve- 
nings are set aside for each individual sport, including basket- 
ball, tennis, swimming, badminton, and the minor sports of 
ping pong, shuffleboard, etc. 



Because a special women's group draws coeds to the game 
courts, most active members in the H.P.E. club are men. In 
addition to concentrating on actual sports participation, an 
effort is made for future physical education instructors to 
meet and hear outstanding teachers in this field 

Frank Spechalske was president of the H.P.E. Club through- 
out the year, and Harriette Russell was secretary. 



First Ro^ : Jim Thomas. Raymond Giannimore. 
Donald Pape, William Schenk. James Norrh, 
Vincent Vitale. 

Second Row: Maryan Tiffin. Elizabeth Robinson, 
Carolyn Bean, Jeanne Fulwebber. Sue Yokum, 
Nancianne Martin, Mary Jane Burton. 

Third Row: Lawrence Snyder. George Streby. 
Richard Paskert, Frank Mesek. Fred Klaisner, 
Virgil Roman, William Moritz, William 
Sudeck. Neal Nelson, George John, Carl 
Hutton. 



First Ro>x : Raymond Brannon, James Van Gil- 
der. John Helleis. 

Second Row: Doris Heupel. Pat Maglione, Jane 
Lais, Barbara King, Kay Baukas. Louise Galto. 

Third Row: Frank Romeo. Charles McAllister. 
Paul Mathews. Wade Milford, George Caso, 
Edward Mansher, Warren Craigo, Lloyd Gray, 



Professor Ballenger, Frank Spechalske. Professor 
Altmann, Hariette Russell, Professor Seidel, Pro- 
fessor Mellert. 




VARSITY 
"K" CLUB 



T TARSITY K Club is one group in which the members do 
^ most of their work before they are installed. 
Only men who have earned a varsity letter in KSU sports 
are eligible for admission to the closed club, presided over by 



President Richard Paskert. Other officers are John Moore, 
Frank Spechalske, and Jack Urchek. 

Speakers from the professional sports world lecture and 
show athletic films at the monthly meetings, and sports books 
are circulated among "K" members. High school athletes are 
urged to attend KSU at a special day each Spring. 




First Ro« : H- Wolfgram. L. Federico. R. Beachy, D. 
Wilson. G. Streby, P. Del Vecchio, W. Kunz. 

Second Row: R. Gerbitz, \V. Knight. F. Spechalske. R. 
Pasken, N. Nelson, J. Moore, F, Klein, F. Russell, 
\V. Sudeck, 

Third Row: T. Malaney, J. Laurenson, T. Salesman, W. 
Weir, T, Davcy, F. Mesek, W. Moritz, J. Hughes, F, 
Klaisner, V. Roman, T, Wilhelm, D. Palumbo, W, 
Barton, D, Follin, G, Kovalik, V, Vitale, L. Snyder, 



First Row: Robert Kin.q, Joseph Perconti, Professor 

Olson, Richard Fannin. 
Second Row: Myron Pearson, Matthew Dolence, 



T7EW persons knew such an organization as the Industrial 
-*- Arts Club existed until by a novel skit the men in the group 
succeeded in winning the independent award at the 1947 
Pork Barrel, 

Spurred on by their first success, the club membership ex- 
panded under President Joseph Perconti, and leaders in plas- 
tics, metals, and woodworking trades came to the campus as 
guest speakers. 



Equipment in the school shops was used by men in the 
club to complete several successful projects. 



INDUSTRIAL 
ARTS CLUB 



248 



FLYING CLUB 



npWENTY srudents invested $75 each of their own 
■*- money to organize the University Flying Club, 
Inc., early last Fall. 

The money was used to buy a club plane, made of 
Luscomb metal, with a two-way radio and a 75 horse- 
power engine. With a cruising speed of 115 miles 



per hour and a 500-mile range, the plane is used by 
all club members. 

Ronald Armitage is president, with other offices 
tilled by Jerome Andrews, Tad Stokes, and Harold 
Province. The flyers hope to join a national college 
flight group soon. 



The Fli-ing Club plane gets a good send-off as 
a student-member takes to the air on a cross- 
country flight. The plane met with a mishap 
late in the winter quarter and was out of the 
running for the rest of the school year. 



Professor Paton explains the proper air routes 
to Flying Club members before they take off 
on a long run. 



First Row: George Williams, William An- 
derson, Donald Wohlford, John LiUey, 
Jim Butcher, Richard Johnson. 

Second Row: Frank Kovasic, Professor Lucy, 
John Lyon, George Ebel, Harold Province, 
Bernard Zents, Ronald Armitage, Edward 
Mayer, Tad Stokes, Professor Paton. 



249 




CHEMISTRY CLUB 



"\ yT EETING rhe demand for a general club for students in- 
-'-'-*- terested in and studying chemistry, the group by that 
name was formed little more than a year ago. On the Chem- 



istry Club program this year were lectures by leaders in various 
scientific industries and special talks by Kent State faculty 
members. 

Presiding over the monthly meetings of the twenty-five 
members was President Mary Misko, assisted by Richard 
Durst, Virginia Straight, Virginia Vaughn, and Robert Marty. 
A membership party was the year's main social event. 




First Row: Ellis Mills, Sam Fraley, Charles Lehman, 
Kirkwood Glauser, Ralph Keefer, Georee Reesman, 
Charles Dean Infield, Kenneth Marcy, Charles Barn- 
merlin. George Ulvild. 

Second Row: Paula Quinn. Jean Shaffer. John Hadely, 
Bob Marry, Mary Misko, Marilyn Virginia Straight, 
Prof. Caroll Joan Shilling, Gae Caldren. 

Third Row: Benjamin Hadely, Harold Hunt, Joyce 
Bates, Prof. Clarence CtxDk, Dr. Will Thompson, 
Donald Mears, Roger Watkin5, Dr. Maurice Palmer, 
Marilyn Wilms, Esther Purdy. Tames Wise. 



Cecelia ELson. Jane Peragoy. Marearet Boyle. Dorothy 
Batson, Genevieve Wample. Ruth Wright. 

First Row: Mary Altman. Margaret Boyle, Blanche Gal- 
loway, Irene Brode, Sarah Jolinson. 

Second Row: Ann Gray, Cecelia Elson, Harriet Hal- 
lamby. Marilyn Griffon 



^ ARRYING on their armed services tradition of help to 
^-^ others, twenty-five coeds formed the University Women 
Veterans Association, as a companion organization to the 
men's K-Vets. 

Efforts of the veteran women were directed toward finding 
additional housing for all women students at KSU. Work was 
climaxed each term at a formal dinner. 



Ann Gray was president of the Women Vets, and other of- 
ficers were Sarah Johnson, Margaret Boyle, and Rachel Jane 
Thomas. Several professors also worked with them. 



WOMEN 
VETERANS 



250 



UNIVERSIT 



1^^V'€ f^S"^ 



'T^WO hundred World War II veterans temporarily 
^ forgot troubles with allotment checks and bonuses 
this Fall as they rook on a special new project: boy- 
cotting the "new look" in longer skirts for women. 
Although this stunt made an Associated Press wire, 
the University X^eterans Association — formerly K 



Marty Ptinsgraft and Trac"y DeForest model the 
male comeback ro the women's new look. It all 
began when a local clorhins dealer tried to 
-ct rid of h s onit OHthr^ 



iih ihe right- 



I.ven Proleisoi" Moiia FJctLhcr yci,s in on ihe 
.let. The vets probably were trying to find 
polirital science A'*? the easy way. 



cts caught in the yard-stick 




% 



i 






3^i 






SA 



S^ndarxi MMi 



m.^' 






■^v 






John Leu is S/jge 




: tlie iiieals ar a itatic^u l/itcuith lU ciiii 



It has variously been said that clothes, music, and eating habits reflect 
national spirit. Newest insight into American customs has come from a con- 
temporary writer who believes the key to complex human nature can be found 
in the advertisements, which alternately reflect the inventive power and the 
desires of the people. 

Whether true or not, advertising still holds great influence over the Ameri- 
can public. Students would not be at Kent State — in fact, KSU would not exist 
at all — if not for advertising. The same holds true for every textbook handled 
by the bookstore; for every seat planned for the stadium; and for every ice cream 
bar consumed by Hub-loving Staters. 

In this single section of the yearbook may be found predictions and reflec- 
tions of the ideals of the nation — and Kent State University. 



Ad 



vertisers 



253 



Trintcrs ^/Ashland, Ohio 



1879. 



Printing 
Lithographing 



Paper Boxes 
Calendars 



254 




e>c 



c=:H~ctL 



vuieJ^ and 



\^ taaniTi 



il 



aLians 



A Cappella Choir 224 

Administration Assistants 40 

Administration Building 4 

Administrative Officials 32 

All Greek Formal 72 

Allocations Committee 231 

Alpha Epsilon 164 

Alpha Gamma Delta 146 

Alpha Omega 148 

Alpha Phi Beta 166 

Alpha Psi Omega 217 

Alpha Xi Delta 150 

Alumni Organization 115 

Art Club 221 

Band 222 

Baseball Team 182 

Basketball 200 

Beta Gamma 152 

Big-Little Sister Tea 62 

Blue Key 213 

Board of Trustees 29 

Booster Club 243 

Bowman, Dr. George A., 26 

Campus Day 48 

Campus Night 51 

Campus Night Song Fest 50 

Cardinal Key 212 

Chemistry Club 250 

Chestnut Burr 238 

Chestnut Burr Formal 84 

Chi Omega 154 

Chi Pi 216 

Christian Foundation 233 

Deans 30 

Debate Club 241 

Delta Gamma 156 

Delta Phi Sigma 168 

Delta Sigma Pi 214 

Delta Zeta 158 

Department Heads and Faculty . 34 

Dormitories 69 

Elementary Education Club 244 

Engleman Hall 8 

Faculty 

Accounting 36 

Art 33 

Biology 39 

Business Administration 38 

Chemistry 39 

Commerce 34 

Economics 38 

Elementary Education 35 

English 35 

Foreign Language 34 

Geography 39 

Health and Physical Education 37 



History 37 

Home Economics 34 

Industrial Arts 39 

Journalism 33 

Kindergarten-Primary Education 36 

Library Science 34 

Mathematics 36 

Music 33 

Philosophy 37 

Physics 35 

Political Science 37 

Psychology 38 

Secretarial Science 35 

Sociology 38 

Speech 33 

Faculty Night 91 

Flying Club 249 

Football Highlights 64 

Football 191 

Fourth Estate 240 

Freshman Class 140 

Gamma Phi Beta 160 

Gamma Tau Delta 170 

Golf Team 185 

Graduate School 94 

Graduation 1947 52 

Homecoming 58 

Home Economics Club 245 

HPE Club 247 

Independent Students Association 242 

Industrial Arts Building 20 

Industrial Arts Club 248 

International Relations Club 241 

Inter-Fraternity Council 163 

Inter-Religious Council 231 

Junior Class 116 

Kappa Delta Pi 220 

Kappa Mu Kappa 172 

Kappa Sigma Chi 174 

Kent HaU 14 

Kent Stater 236 

Kindergarten-Primary Club 244 

Lambda Phi 216 

Lowry HaU 22 

McGilvrey Hall 18 

Madrigal Singers 225 

Management Association 227 

Masque Ball 82 

Men's Glee Club 91 

Men's Intramurals 206 

Men's Union 229 

Messiah 68 

Music Club 226 

Moulton HaU 24 

New Buildings 90 

Newman Club 234 



Newman Club Dance _ 67 

New Look 83 

NTFC 80 

Orchestra 223 

Penny Carnival 91 

Phi Alpha Theta 220 

Phi Beta Phi 176 

Phi Gamma Theta 178 

Phi Sigma Xi 219 

Pigskin Prom 65 

Pi Kappa Delta 217 

Plays — See University Theater 

Pork Barrel 44 

Psi Chi 219 

Psi Lambda Omicron 218 

Psychology Clinic 63 

Radio Workshop 88 

Registration 54 

RockweU Library 12 

ROTC 79 

Rowboat Regatta 46 

Russian Arts Club 226 

Sadie Hawkins Dance 66 

Senior Class 98 

Short Course in Photography 87 

Sophomore Class 132 

Speech Clinic 63 

Square and Compass 227 

State Officials 28 

Smdent Council 230 

Summer Session 1947 53 

Swimming Team 184 

Top Hop 74 

Track Team 183 

Training School 16 

University Chorus 225 

University Theater 

Accent on Youth 86 

Antigone 77 

Dear Ruth 56 

Harriet 57 

My Sister Eileen — Freshman Play 76 

The Late George Apley 45 

University Theater Formal 78 

Varsity K 248 

Veterans' Organization 251 

Wesley Foundation 235 

Women's Athletic Association 246 

Women's Athletics 208 

Women's League 228 

Women Veterans 250 

Wrestling 186 

YMCA 232 

YWCA 232 

Zeta Iota 218 



255 




To the editors oj the 1948 Chestnut 
Burr who have produced this, the finest 
oJ all Kent year-books. 

We consider it a privilege to have 
worked with this competent and con- 
sciencious staff and we are extremely 
proud oJ our part in their achievement. 



THE 

a/c 



ORTHEPfJ 



ENGRAVING AND ELECTROTYPE CO. 

413 SCHROYER AVE. S.W. CANTON 2, OHIO 



256 



FACULTY INDEX 



Adams, Harry C 57, 190, 200 

Allyn, Arden L 30, 214 

Altmann, George J 37, 234, 247 

Amner, F. Dewey 34 

Anthony, Donald 38, 214 

Apple, Mrs. Marie H 37 

Arnold, Dwight L 36 

Atkinson, Charles 41 

Baker, Maury D 37 

Ballenger, Frank E 37, 247 

Barich, Dewey F 39 

Barnes, Sherman B 37 

Barss, Donald E 231, 235 

Baum, Maurice 37 

Baus, Paul J 33 

Beall, Florence G '. . . 35 

Beck, Henry C, Jr 33 

Beck, James R 39 

Beck, Paul E 32, 38 

Begala, Joseph W 37, 183, 185, 187, 192, 198 

Belanger, Aurilien J 39 

Berg, Emil 32 

Bigler, Eugene 38 

Blair, Thomas M. H 35 

Boffo, Louis S 38 

Bond, Forest 231 

Bowers, George 39 

Bowman, George A 26, 29, 52, 79, 87, 90, 114, 142 

Brady, Ballard 1 36, 220 

Brewer, Mrs. Gladys M 38 

Brewer, John C 38 

Brooks, Foster L 36 

Brumfield, Emalou '. . . 36 

Bush, George L 38 

Byler, Mrs. Barbara 33 

Byler, Kenneth 33, 222 

Byrne, H. D 37 

Carapetyan, Caro M 33, 50, 224, 225 

Carroll, J. Cleve 38, 250 

Carter, Laten 224, 231, 233 

Chapman, Gerald H. 38 

Chesnutt, Karl G 37, 183, 190, 199, 200 

Clark, Raymond M 38, 94, 171, 219 

Clarke, Walton D 33, 217 

Cochran, George H 38 

Conway, William F 36 

Cook, Clarence L 39, 219, 250 

Cooke, George H 36 

Corey, C. Stanley 38 

Cramer, Elizabeth Moomaw 245 

Crecraft, Earl W 37 

Crowell, Alfred A 33, 40, 87 

Cunningham, Harry A 39, 220 

Darrah, William C 38, 215 

Darst, Marian 35 

Davidson, Frederick E 38 

Davis, Charlotte I 35 



Denker, Fred H 33 

DeVollid, Mrs. Mary W 34 

DeWeese, Arville 37 

Dexter, Ralph W 39 

Diles, Dorothy V 35 

Dirkson, John W 39 

Dittmer, A. L 33 

Dix, Robert C 29 

Dixon, Lawrence W 38 

Drake, Mrs. Irene G 33 

Drake, Raleigh 38, 219 

DuBois, Arthur E 35 

Dunning, Sarah 35 

Dustheimer, Oscar L 36 

Easterling, George R 39 

Egan, Wesley W 33 

Eisen, Edna E 39 

Ellis, Hilda Jane 35 

Esser, Robert H 34 

Eswine, Harold M 38 

Evans, Paul L 36 

Fair, Rhema 40 

Fletcher, Mona 37, 25 1 

Fosdick, James 33, 87 

Fries, Jean N 35 

Gardner, Thomas F 34 

Garnett, W. Leslie 35 

Gilbert, Mme. Jeanne 34 

Given, John H. 38 

Goudeau, John M 34 

Gravereau, Victor P 34, 171, 214 

Gray, Eleanor 33, 217 

Gray, Mrs. Esther M 34 

Green, Dorothy M 34 

Griebling, Eric 35 

Haley, Alice 34, 218 

Hanan, Joseph B 29, 90 

Hanway, Regina F 35 

Harris, Louis K. 37 

Harshbarger, Frances 36 

Hauser, Mrs. Elgitha M 34 

Hays, Ardin E 38 

Hazard, John L 34 

Hazen, Isabelle 34 

Heer, Amos L 36, 41, 220 

Hellman, Florence M 37 

Heylman, Martin 33 

Herrick, J. Arthur 39 

Hill, Laura 35, 232 

Hippie, John R 34 

Hissong, Clyde 28 

Hobbs, Clinton H 39 

Holm, James N 33, 78, 217, 241 

Hoose, Mrs. Isabelle 38, 219 

Hoover, Ruth 35 

Hudson, Hersel W 38 



257 



FACULTY INDEX, Continued 



Humphrey, Nina S 33 

Hungerford, Harlan 35 

Hyatt, Ada V 31, 35, 228 

Hyland, Thelma 33 

Ibele, Oscar H 37 

Jeffrey, E. Gail 33 

Jenkins, Emerson D 36 

Johnsen, Martin 39 

Johnson, Marvin L 36 

Jordan, Nona Isavel 34, 218 

Kaiser, John W 36 

Kelley, Kenneth L 39 

Kent, Evelyn E 35 

Kent, Robert L 33, 217, 24l 

Kessler, Charles 39 

Kirk, Charles F 34 

Kitner, Harold C 33 

Miles, Harold E 33, 50 

Miller. Alvin J 36 

Miller, Stanley C 38 

Montenegro, Ernesto 34 

Montgomery, John R 33, 177, 217 

Moore, Victor M 37 

Moran, Raymond K 34, 198, 199 

Morbito, Joseph F 39 

Morrill, Douglas W 38 

Morrow, Robert 33, 221 

Mougin, Mrs. Helene T 34 

Mull, Francis G 38, 227 

Munzenmayer, Lester H 36, 220 

Musselman, Fren 31, 35, 40 

Nicholson, John B., Jr 34 

Novotny, Elmer L 33 

Olson, Delmar W 39 

Olson, Emma J 36, 248 

Omer, Charles W 38 

Oswalt, Mrs. Edna R 38 

Paine, William R 35 

Pake, Edward H 35 

Palmer, Maurice B 39, 175, 250 

Palmquist, Robert 36 

Pamies, Alberto 34 

Paton, Andrew W 39, 175, 249 

Pearce, Daniel W 38, 219 

Perkins, Charles C 38 

Ferryman, Virginia C 35 

Plescher, Marcelline 35 

Politella, Joseph 37, 231 

Popa, John D 37 

Powers, Murray 33 

Prescott, Arthur J 35 

Pringle, Kenneth R 35, 46 

Radock, Michael B 33, 41, 87, 216 

Raup, Hallock F 39 

Raup, Mrs. Lillian J 39 

Read, Gerald 36 



Rees, Janet C 35 

Rees, Trevor J 37, 59, 190, 199 

Rehder, Mary Jane 38. 219 

Ritchie, Oscar W 38 

Robbins, S. Martha 36, 40, 62, 232 

Roberts, A. Sellew 37 

Russel, Ethel M 62 

Ryder, Alice E 34 

Satterfield, Chester E 35 

Sauers, Harold 41, 242 

Savage, Carleton N 39 

Shindler, Clayton M 32 

Schoepfle, George K 35 

Seidel, Beverly L 37, 246, 247 

Shaw, Frances , 37 

Shriver, Phillip R 37 

Shumaker, Earl 39 

Smith, Elizabeth W 39 

Smyth, Carleton J 33, 87 

Spicer, John Reed 30, 35, 114 

Stevens, Wesley C 37, 182, 184, 190, 192, 198 

Stewart, Alfred W 36 

Stopher, Emmet C 32, 36 

Stopher, Margaret 35 

Storkan, Charles J 36 

Stump, E. Turner 33, 78, 217 

Sublette, Florence 33 

Sumner, Charles B 39 

Swan, G. Hazel 36, 244 

Taff. Charles A - . . 36, 214 

Tarr, G. Emory 36 

Taylor, William 33, 87, 240 

Thompson, Will S 39, 250 

Tischendorf, Elbert W 39 

Treckel, Karl F 38 

Van Campen, Marion 35 

Wall, Lt. Col. Thomas 40, 79 

Wannemacher, William L 37 

Weldy, Dwight 33 

Weiskopf, William J 38 

West, Wilbur W 33 

Weston, Evelyn G 39 

White, Robert 1 31 

Whitney, Henry N 37 

Whitton, Bertha E 37 

Wilber, Herbert W 36 

Williams, Ernestine 34, 40 

Williams, John R 29 

Williams, Weldon M 35, 169 

Winslow, Charles N 38, 63, 219 

Wooddell, Lawrence 41 

Woodruff, Olive 36 

Wright, G. Harry 33, 78, 217 

Yeager, Kennett W 38 

Zetzer, Alfred 33 

Zucchero, Peter J 39 



258 



STUDENT INDEX 



Aardwcll, Joan 225 

Abbott, Betty 117, 241 

Abbott, Franklin 242 

Abood, Myron 133, 234, 237 

Abraham, Richard 134 

Ahrutz, Joseph 136, 177 

Acerra, Annamary 98, 161 

Acierno, Rosemary 131, 216 

Ackerman, Joanne 149 

Adam, Mary 95 

Adametz, Carolyn 98, 219 

Adams, Aurelia 155, 225 

Adams, Hobart 117, 235 

Adams, Wilbur 45 

Addams, Patricia 153 

Albu, Carl 118 

Alden, Paul 233 

Aldrich, William 98 

Alessi, Vincent 98, 177 

Alexander, Morton 98 

Alexander, Richard 98 

Allbery, Benjamin 184 

Allen, John 171 

AUio, Thomas ' . . 138 

AUyn, Lois 98, 161 

Almsberg, Pauline 232 

Alten, Marjorie 139, 224, 234 

Altman, Mary 98, 232, 235, 250 

Amico, Jerry 202, 203, 205 

Amrine, William 99 

Ancik, Mike 133 

Anderson, Berry 225 

Anderson, Conlon 244 

Anderson, Donald 117, 131 

Anderson, Elliott 13"' 

Anderson, Harry 201, 202 

Anderson, Jean 119, 244 

Anderson, John 127 

Anderson, William 249 

Anti'pas, Ann 119, 153 

Anweiler, Calvin 99, 122 

Appel, Benjamin 165, 198 

Armmgton, Marcye 123 

Armitage, Ronald 121, 249 

Arnold, Caroline 56, 222 

Arnold Charlene 84, 85, 149 

Arnold, Richard 6, 8, 12, 24, 85, 124, 238 

Artale, Chris 220 

Ashby. Barbara 99, 147, 220 

Ashbv, Robert US 

Ashley Richard 227 

Atkinson. Terry 137, 173 

Atwood. Howard 173 

Atzenhofer, Edwin 133 

Avant, Bonnie 74, 75, 99, 147, 218, 228, 232, 245 

Averell, Jacqueline 147 

Averill Mary Jane 161 

Avril, Lawrence 175, 214 

Ayre, Dorothy 63, 77, 95, 210, 21" 

Babka, Joseph 225 

Bachman, Beatrice 117 

Bader, Robert 99, 187, 188, 189 

Badia, Dominick 139 

Baele, Roger 6, 138, 239 

Bailey, Charles 95 

Bailey, Nancy 125, 153 

Bailey, PrisciUa 157 

Bailey, Robert 131 

Baird. Jack 99 

Baker, Clay, Jr 130 

Baker, Florence 244 

Baker, Fred I69 

Baker. Howard 184 

Baker. Jack 128, 173 

Baker. Nancy 129, 151 

Baker. Ruth ' I6I 

Baker, Shirley 149 

Baker, William 136 

Baldridge, Mary 134, 147 

Baldwin, Anne 157 

Ball, Lois 147 

Ballinger, Dale 136, 227 

Bamberger, Richard 171 

Bamberger, Marjorie 99, 241 

Bammerlin, Charles 139, 250 



Bandi. John 167 

Banker, Robert 223, 235 

Bantum. Harold 122 

Barabas, Edward 135 

Barber, Glenn 128, 173 

Barchick, Gene 234 

Barchino, Vincent 137 

Barden, Hal 98 

Barden. Janice 98 

Barker, Mary Lou 120 

Barkley, Edward 95 

Barnes, Ross 98 

Barnes. Stuart 134 

Harnum, Jean 232, 234, 244 

Barr, Frances 136 

Barreiro. Manuel 135 

Barrett. John 167 

Barrett, Marjorie 225 

Barrett, Martin 131, 227 

Barrett, Thomas 167, 224 

Barry, Jeannette US 

Barry, John 167 

Bartchv, Richard 127 

Barth, William 235, 243 

Bartlow. Betty 157 

Barton, Charles 130, 194, 199, 248 

Bashline. Dolores 59, 98, 149, 220 

Baskett, Glenn 125 

Bast. Margaret 95 

Bates, Edwin 98 

Bates, Joyce 121, 219, 250 

Batson. Dorothy 250 

Battes. Philip 118 

Battista. Rudolph 182 

Baughman, Mark 135 

Baukas. Katherine 127, 246, 247 

Baumann, Lea 86, I6I 

Baumgartner, Lou 133 

Bauschlinger, Harry 133 

Beachler. Richard 134 

Beachly. Gene 98, 175 

Beachy. Robert 169, 183, 195, 199, 248 

Beal. Wilbur 122, 227 

Bean. Carolyn 225, 247 

Beard. Caroline 137 

Beattie. Janet, 98, 157 

Beatty. Wayne 120 

Beavers, Paul 136 

Beazel. George 131 

Becherer, William 173, 126 

Becker. Dean 136 

Becker. Erwin 139 

Beckman, Jean 209, 234, 241, 243 

Beckwith, Richard 51 

Beeman, Gerald, 119, 227 

Beeman, Svlvia 222, 223, 226 

Beier, William 173 

Beilhart. Howard 134 

Belanger, Alice 94 

Belden, Helen 133 

Bales, John 167 

Belgan, Francis 234 

Bender. Beverly 134, 232 

Benner. Forrest 184, 185 

Bennett, Margaret 244 

Berg, Barbara 42, 49, 83, 124, 157, 244 

Bergem, Jerry 98 

Bergcr, Verna 139, 232 

Bernhardt, Jack 128 

Berrodin, Eugene 217 

Bertellotti, Norman 217, 241 

Bertram, Betty Mae 133, 147, 224, 226 

Betz, Ethel 221 

Bibee, Michael 138 

Bible, Maxwell 235 

Bica, Virginia 96 

Bigley, William 135 

Bilanych, Ann 133, 134, 234 

BiUer, Betty 135 

Bingham, Laura 117 

Bird. Garnett 219, 232 

Birkner, William 4 

Biro. Raymond 136 

Bishop, Helen 123 

Bishop, Roger 95 



259 



COMPUMENTS 



CAMPUS SUPPLY 
CAPTAIN BRADY 
DONAGHY DRUG 

Supplying the needs 
of the faculty and 
students of K.S.U. 



Kent's Finest 
Restaurant 




ROBIN HOOD 



LINCOLN at MAIN 



KENT, OHIO 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Bissett, James 44, 177 

Bissler, Martha 151, 234, 246 

Bittner, Daisy Jean 133 

Bittner, Maurice 222, 223 

Bjorklund, Wilbert '. 139 

Bjorson, Philip 139 

Black, Margaret 134, 232 

Blackburn, Carl 131, 231 

Blackmore, Donn 99 

Blackwelder, Anne 147, 225 

Blackwell, Mary Jane 156, 157, 244 

Blair, John 99 

Blanchard, Leslie 233 

Blaurok, Eugene 183 

Bliss, Raymond 223, 224 

Block, Virginia 99, 118, 156, 157, 228 

Blood, Shirley 99 

Blumer, Robert 49, 99, 106 

Bodey, Ernest 99 

Bodolay, Margaret 131, 244 

Boehm, Hildegarde 81,155 

Boettler, James 138, 223 

Boffo, Opal 95 

BoUman, Robert 183 

BoUmeyer, Joan 138 

Bologna, Vincent 139 

Bolton, Dorothy 135 

Bonar, John 137, 223 

Bond, Frank 99, 171, 215 

Boone, Annette 244 

Boone, Margaret 62, 131, 228, 242 

Borman, Raymond 117 

Borovicka, George 134 

Bosley, Delbert 99 

Boru, John 100, 175 

Bowden, Marianne 126, 151 

Bowden, Patricia 136, 151, 234, 246 

Bowers, Charles 223 

Bowser, Lillian 159 

Boyd, Frank 100 

Boyle, Margaret 129, 234, 242, 250 

Bozeka, Nick 44, 56, 58, 81, 217 

Brace, Eleanor 157 

Bramerd, James 58, 100, 169, 219 

Branco, Doris 157, 244 

Brand, Joy 44, 81, 100, 218, 220, 226 

Brand, Virginia 44, 224 

Brandt, Martha 100 

Brannon, Ralph 134 

Brannon, Raymond 133, 247 

Brant, Naomi 226 

Breath, Margaret 161, 223 

Bricker, Maxine 245 

Brietman, Burton 165 

Brigeman. F. W 95 

Brindza, James 121, 169 

Brister, Nena 81, 223 

Brobst, Marilyn 147 

Brobst, William 95 

Brodbeck, Irene 50, 81, 149, 224, 225 

Brode, Irene 250 

Brode, Joseph 137, 223 

Brooks, 'Bruce 6, 119 

Brooks, John 120 

Brooks, Louise 100 

Brooks, Paul 100 

Broski, Robert 128 

Broughton, Frank 100 

Broughton, Leone 100 

Brower, Barbara 81, 159 

Brown, Carol 132, 155 

Brown, Edna 117, 232, 245 

Brown, James 177 

Brown, Jay 227 

Brown, John 223 

Brown, Margaret 243, 244 

Brown, Peter 100, 219 

Brown, Robert L 124 

Brown, Robert R 120 

Brown, Vernon 13" 

Brown, William 136 

Brown, Willis 124 

Brugge, Germaine 139 

Brunner. Richard 243 

Bruns, Marion 49, 100 

Brusak, Georgette 133 

Brust, Marilyn 158, 159, 162 

Brustein, Phillip 116, 127, 165 



260 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Buckley, Betty 234, 

Buckley, Robert 

Buckson, Patricia J 138, 156, 

Budner, Duane 110, 

Budner, Harry 

Buher, Margaret 134, 161, 

Bulgrin, Robert 

Bullock, Jimmie 44, 45, 56, 58, 100, 110, 213, 217, 

Bumgartner Louis 

Burg Henry 

Burke, Leonard 

Burke. Mary 

Burke, Ted 

Burkhardt, Dona Mae 51, 100, 

Burkhardt, Dona May 58, 100, 148, 

Burkhart, Harry 

Burmeister, Henry 

Burnell, Harry 

Burnett. Carl 

Burns. Karl Jr 

Burns. Suzanne 155, 

Burt. Evelyn 135, 159, 

Burton, Mary Jane 246, 

Burv. Henry 

Bush. William 

Bush. William L 

Busson. James 

Butcher. James 130, 219, 

Button, Margery 100, 

Buzzelli, Roosevelt 

Byrd, Robert 

Bvrn. Jane 

Bvrn. William 

Byrne, William 173, 

Byrnes, Stephen 126, 

Cacioppo. Anthony 100, 

Cacioppo. Dominick 

Cadwell. Thomas 

Cadv. William 

Cahill. Joann 138, 

Caine, Camilla 157, 

Caldren, Gae 100, 147, 

Caldwell. Becky 119, 

Caldwell, Charlotte 

Caliguire, Joe 

Caliguire, Pat 

Callahan, Carol 137, 153, 

Calucci, Constance 

Calvaruso, Joseph 

Calvary, Frank 165, 

Calvin, David 

Campbell, Mildred 

Canning. Gordon 

Capri. Eddie 192, 

Carapetyan. Leon 

Carboni, Robert 

Carey. Jeanne 

Carey. Leonard 

Caricofe, Jean 

Carioti. Frank, Jr. .3, 26, 81, 84, 99, 100, 213, 216, 224, 

Carney Robert 

Carpenter Doris 6, 239, 

Carraher, Virginia 

Carrel. John . 

Carroll, Betty 136, 

Carroll, Dolores 

Carroll, James 

Carrothers, Carl 

Carson. Mary Lou 

Case. Frank 

Case. George 

Casev. Robert 100, 173, 213, 236. 

Casev. William. Ir 184, 

Caskey, William, Jr 

Caso, George 134, 

Cassidy, Donald 

Casto, Patricia 

Cauphin, Elmer 

Ceglia, Patsy 

Chalfant, Martha 151, 

Chambers, lona 159, 

Chambers. Robert C 179, 

Chastain, Joel 100, 

Cheetham. Wilfred 126, 

Cherpas, James 

Cheurco, Ida 

Cheyney. Arnold 139, 

Chidley, Joseph 223, 



18 
57 
30 
20 
34 
21 
31 
34 
14 
26 
95 
71 
49 
49 
29 
82 
84 
00 
24 
43 
44 
47 
17 
39 
00 
69 

249 
24 
38 

204 
59 
3~ 
29 
67 
19 
23 
36 
00 

234 
23 
50 
61 
31 
38 
38 
34 

234 
38 

241 
77 
95 
36 
98 

222 

234 
57 
00 
23 
38 
28 

243 
34 
22 
21 
61 
26 
00 
57 
73 
67 
40 
85 
24 
47 
28 
00 

231 
20 
44 
44 
06 
79 
25 
36 
20 
24 
26 



D. L. SESSIONS 



i^^y^ 



Sales and Sendee 



PHONE 4616 



5 324 N. WATER ST. 



MILK 



Most Valuable Food 



FENN DAIRY 



KENT, OHIO 



261 




W. MAIN ST. 



LU LYMAN, DEALER 



KENT, OHIO 



SAFETY & ECONOMY 
For You 

Before You Take 

That Trip 

Let Us Check Your Tires 

FOGLE MOTORS Inc. 

CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH 



403 LONGMURE RD. 



Phone 6628 



KENT, OHIO 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Childress, Betty 153 

Chill, Elaine 46, 119 

Chill, John 100 

Chisholm, Walter 222, 223, 226 

Christenson, Alfred 136, 221 

Christopherson, Ray 225 

Cibula, Betty 217, 241 

Ciresi, Joseph 101, 177 

Clark, Barbara 155. 244 

Clark, Dolores 45, 86, 110, 133 

Clark, Henry 183 

Clark, John 171 

Clark, Mary 153 

Clark, Robert 101, 173 

Clark, Tom 183 

Clay, Wilbur 235 

Claypoole, Jane 147, 224 

Cleaton, Marian 137, 155, 232, 244 

Clevenger, Dottie 101, 160, 161, 218 

Clinkscales, Dorothy 232 

Cloiigh, Donald 101, 214, 227 

Clough, Gwen 155, 225, 227 

Clouse, Michael 138 

Clugh, John R 120 

Cochran. Dale 138 

Cochran, Robert 133 

Coco, Charles 234 

Cohen, Ronald 80, 101, 165, 227 

Cohen. Sue 133 

Colby, Larry 234 

Cole, Marion 6, 101, 115, 212, 216, 236, 238, 240 

Cole, Robert 167 

Coll, James 182, 199 

Collin, Carolyn 224. 242 

Collins, John 139, 235 

Collver, John 203 

Coionese, Joseph 169 

Colucci, Constance 159 

Combus, Ethel 244 

Compton, Milton 101 

Cone, Richard 125 

Conkle, Peary 101 

Constantine, Bess 129, 245 

Converse, Florence 245 

Cook, Beverly 101 

Cook, Charles 179, 224 

Cook, Jeanne 101, 149, 212, 217, 241 

Cook, Josephine 123, 232, 234 

Cook, Paul 184 

Cooke, William 167 

Cooley, Richard 222 

Cooper, Wilbur 101 

Copeland, Cuba 134 

Copley, Janet 147 

Corkins, Edwin 123 

Cornwell, Robert 124 

Cory, Edward 95 

Cosentino, Augustine 94 

Cosier, Albert 135 

Costarella, Virgil 118, 222, 223 

CotteriU, John 60 

Cotton, Ben 117, 225 

Couris. Chrisavi 95 

Courtney, Marion 134 

Covault, Adelle 101, 244 

Cover, Janice 101, 157 

Cowles, Elwyn 61 

Cox, Donald 175 

Cox, William 183, 203 

Craigo, Warren 101, 220, 247 

Cramer, James 173 

Crandall, Neil 236 

Crawford, David 241 

Crawford, Gertrude 101, 241 

Crawford, Janet 118, 155, 162, 232 

Crawford, Ruth 122, 234, 237 

Crawford, Thomas 84, 171, 121, 173, 241 

Crisp, Betty 121, 244 

Crisp, James 135 

Criswell, William 179 

Crone. Gloria 138 

Crorey, Bill 173, 220, 229 

Cross. Dorothy 133, 233, 244 

Crouse, Eleanor 101 

Croxton, Gwen 244 

Crutchley, Kenneth 131 

Csuti, Anna 136, 235 

Culley, Becky 62, 244 



262 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Cummings, James 225 

Cummins, Jerome 175 

Cunningham, Ethel 244 

Curphey, Thomas 101 

Custis, Jean 94 

Cvengros, Kathleen 153 

Czech, George 233 

Dacko, Irene 133 

Dagher, Joseph 220 

Dalton, Milo 95 

Daltorio, Albert 136 

Dalzell, William 124 

Dan. John 101, 167, 227 

Danford, Dana 161 

Danford, Robert 121, 173 

Danilo, Martin 167 

Dantzic. Gerald 119, 237, 240 

Danyluke, Alice 101, 241 

Danze, Samuel 119 

Darby, Van 101, 219 

Daum, Charles 129 

Davev, Dorothy 58, 59, 149 

Davev, Mable 67, 74, 75, 101, 149 

Davey, Thomas 48, 49, 58, 101, 107, 213, 230, 248 

David, Cora 119 

Davidson, Bett^' 234, 243 

Davidson, Jean 136, 147, 235, '244 

Davidson, Ruth 219 

Davies, Arthur 169 

Davis, Arthur 101 

Davis, Carlos 124 

Davis, Helen 101, 235 

Davis. Hugh 175 

Davis, Matilda 101, 146, 147, 162, 212, 219, 230 

Davis, Neil 222 

Davis. Norma 101, 220, 226, 244 

Davis. Norman 224, 226 

Davis, Richard 135, 223, 227, 241 

Davis. Robert 173, 196, 198 

Davis. Treva 153 

Davis, William 129, 171, 217, 241 

Deck, Paul 120 

Deedman, Tom 126 

Deetz, Frances 225 

Deforest. Tracy 171, 243, 251 

Dehnbostel, Nellie 95 

Del Santio. J 183 

Del Vecchio. Marion 6, 136, 234, 239 

Del Vecchio. Patrick 101, 173, 193, 198, 248 

DeMartia, Raymond 119, 222, 223, 226 

Demming, John 101, 219, 227 

Dempsey, Philip 6, 179, 230, 237, 238, 243 

DePasquale, Frank l67, 234 

DePompei, Jean 102, 218 

Derks, June 102, 220, 241 

Derose, Virginia 102 

DeScenna, Melba 67, 234 

DeSimio, Dominic 57, 58, 81, 86, 132, 217 

Destro, Vincent 136 

Dettor, Vernon 102 

Devine, Joseph 95 

Diaz, Felix 120 

DiBartolo. Betty 234 

Dick. Richard 223 

Dickerson, Abigail 123, 245 

Dickson, Werner 95 

DiClaudio, Ann 123, 138, 234, 244 

DiCola, Thomas 234 

Dieckmann, Bette 102, 219 

Dietz, Elmer 102 

Dilling, John : 123 

Dillon, John 138 

Dilmore. Sam 224 

DiLucca, Henry 120 

Dimengo, Carl 136 

Dingledine, John 223 

DiNuoscio, Leo 102, 227 

Divney, Herbert 102, 234 

Doak, Robert 138 

Dochus, Leonard 243 

Dodez, Arleen 95 

Dohoda, Peter 134 

Dolence, Matthew 248 

Dolhar, Lois 45, 139 

Domiter, Anne 6, 102, 146, 147, 230, 234, 239 

Donaldy, Ernestine 96 

Donley. Carol 133 

Donnelly, Gloria 234 



HOARD'S 

PRESCRIPTION DRUG STORE 
WALGREEN AGENCY 




Friendly Pleasing Service 
at its Very Best 

119 W. MAIN ST. KENT, OHIO 

PHONE 4141 



K- Shoppe 

for 

Snacks 



or 

Complete Meals 

TABLE 

& 

FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

Corner of Willow & College Sts. 
KENT, OHIO 



263 




BOB'S 

Shoe Repair 

One Day Service or 



121 N. WATER ST 



While You Wait 

KENT, OHIO 



Compliments 

of 

a 

Friend 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Dorenbach, David 243 

Dorenbach, Donald 243 

Dormady, Barbara 224, 225 

Dormady, Gordon 224 

Dornbusch, Charles 133 

Dorsey, Lois 137 

Dosa, John 136 

Dotson, Betty 81 

Douglass, Esther 222, 224 

Douglass, Josephine 84, 85, 102, 153 

Douglass, Judith 134, 153, 224 

Douglass, Janet 125 

Dovenbarger, Roberta 222 

Dover, Mickey 102, 213, 216, 237, 241, 243 

Dowding, Tasman 125 

Downen, Richard 102 

Downs, Edward 96 

Drake, Shirley 159, 246 

Drayer, Alpheus 96 

Dressel, Ralph 96 

DrouiUard, Tom 234 

DuBar, Jules 122 

Dudra, Samuel 175, 226, 243 

Duke, Jacqueline 149 

Dulaney, Mary 161, 225 

Duncan, Robert 121, 213, 229, 230 

Dunvage, Robert 102, 171 

Durling, Ellen 96 

Durst, Richard 117, 223 

Dussel, Richard 96 

Dvorak, Jean 134 

Dzamka, Emery 225 

Dzurec, Richard 117, 134, 234 

Ebel, George 125, 167, 235, 249 

Ebinger, Mary 151, 209 

Eby, Kent 169 

Eckelberry, Robert 138, 173 

Eckert, Clarence 96 

Ede, Dorothy 117 

Edgerton, Janice 151 

Edwards, James 95, 219 

Edwards, Shirley 139, 228, 232 

Egger, Jocob 95 

Eicher, Barbara 225, 244 

Eisenhart, Merle 127, 227 

Elewski, Bernard 134 

Ellers, Richard 234 

Ellis, James 137 

Elson, Cecilia 129, 235, 250 

Elson, Edwin 177 

Elwood, Marcella 147 

Emmons, Richard 96 

Engel, Kenneth 135, 199 

tngren, Marjorie 123, 232, 245 

Ennes, Marge 139, 153, 246 

Enright, Richard 135, 185 

Erdley, Robert 177 

Erdley, Russell 177, 224 

Erlewine, Donald 219 

Eroskey, Richard 183 

Ertler, George 139, 177, 198 

Erwm, Archie 127, 214 

Erwm, Gene 175 

Eshler, Ann 137, 232, 244 

Espersen, Jack 134 

Evans, Julia 139, 245 

Evans, Paul 136 

Evans, Reese 102 

Evans, Rhea 235 

Evans, Robert 134, 179, 196 

Evans, T. .' 182 

Evans, William 226 

Evelyn, Maxine 102, 212, 224, 225, 231, 233 

Ewell, Barbara 102, 149 

Fair, Frank 102 

Fannin, Richard 248 

Fannacci, John 222, 223 

Farmer, Mary 117, 235 

Farnsworth, Robert 171, 229 

Farrar, Betty 151 

Farrell, Mary 102, 222, 223 

Earns, Joseph 51 

Faulds, Betty 102, 212, 246 

Faulk, Ralph 222, 223, 226 

Faust, Felice 55, 81, 102, 212, 217, 224, 226 

Federico, Louis 118, 169, 192, 196, 198, 248 

Fedorka, Frank 74, 128 

Feduniak, Michael 95 



264 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Fehndrich, Fern 245 

Fellows, Evelyn 121, 244 

Fenn, Matt 58 

Ferguson, Marilyn 102 

Ferrell, Josephine 244 

Ferro, Joseph 136 

Ferry, Robert 223 

Fetchet, Frank 134 

Fields, Clarence 243 

Fields, Robert 222 

Fields, Wanda 223 

Fike, William 102, 175 

Finelli, Joseph 169 

Finley, Elwood 137 

Finn, John 125, 169, 213, 236, 237 

Finnegan, John 102 

Fiocca, Joan 226 

Fiori, Maria 131, 220, 234 

Fiori, Rosalia 134, 234 

Fisher, Cletus 127, 241 

Fisher, John 233 

Fitzgerald, Margaret 159, 234 

Flecher, Norman 135 

Fleming, Grace 246 

Fleming, Ruth 244 

Fletcher, Charles 140 

Fletcher, Dean ' 138 

Fletcher, Suzanne 6, 102, 238 

Flickin^er, Janice 139 

Flint, John 225, 231 

Flower, Matthew 96 

Fogarty, William 121 

Foglesong, Leonard 130 

Foldessy, Russell 139 

Foley, Richard 167 

Folkman, Janice 235 

Follin, Dwight 195, 198, 248 

Ford, Earl 102, 175, 219, 222 

Ford, Henry 96, 169 

Ford, June 161 

Fornshell, Audrie 6, 42, 60, 102, 226, 238 

Forrest, John 120, 169, 213, 216 

Foust Joseph 95 

Fonts, Mary 135, 244 

Foutts, Alton 117 

Fox, Gerald 124 

Fox, Robert 165 

Fox, Sidney 129 

Fraley, Samuel 235, 250 

Frane, Richard 135, 177, 183 

Francy, Roger 171 

Frasca, Joseph 102 

Erase, Kathryn 131, 220, 244 

Frazier, Harold 134 

Frederkmg, Ruth 147, 218 

Frederick, Helene 234 

Free, Morris 130 

Fregly, Alfred 135, 234 

Frehs, Adolph 129 

French, Robert 136 

Freidl, Edward 177 

Friedman, Joseph 138, 165, 243 

Fritchley, Jean 223 

Frost, Donald 222 

Fruscella, Rudolph 103 

Fuehrer, Robert 133, 234 

Fulkerson, Betty 103, 224 

Fuller, Glenn 167 

Fullerton, Donna 223, 224, 226 

FuUerton, William 135 

Fulmer, William 169 

Fulton, George 204 

Fulweber, Jeanne 81, l6l, 247 

Furbish, Gerald 124 

Furrer, John 103, 241 

Furst, William 121 

Furino, Catherine 225 

Fusco, Henry 179, 221 

Gaab, Wesley 103 

Gage, Vivian 95 

Gainey, Keith 177 

Gallagher, Ruth 157, 244 

Gallagher, Thomas 175 

Galloway, Blanche 250 

Galloway, Janice 138, 157, 243 

Galloway, Morris 128, 214 

Galto, Louise 247 

Gamble, Lester 138 



Portage County's 



BUICK Dealer 



George E. Gifford 



KENT 



TWO LOCATIONS 



OHIO 



RAVENNA 




KENT 
NATIONAL BANK 

1849 - 1948 

MEMBER OF 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP. 



265 



Where He Can Buy Style 
Merchandise With Good Quality 

Best of W^isbes 

& Good Li/ck 

To The Class of '48 

Purcell's 

THE SMART STORE FOR MEN 



120 SO. WATER ST. 



PHONE 6616 



THE GRID 

Homemade Pies, Cakes & 
Ice Cream 

Short Orders 
Quick Service 

REASONABLY PRICED 



119 N.LINCOLN 



KENT 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Gamble, Roland 224 

Gardner, William 129 

Garmus, Ralph 192, 199 

Garner, Artie 138 

Garner, Virgil 139 

Garnon, Robert 136 

Garrison, Helen 121, 155, 232 

Garver, Elizabeth . . . 224 

Gatti, Salvatore 137, 234, 243 

Gaug, Frances 123 

Gaynor, Teddy 134 

Gebhardt, Joan 244 

Gehring, Alberta 151 

Geisinger, Paul 103 

Gelczer, Robert 124 

George, Clayton 22" 

George, Emil 103, 169 

George, Loreto 137, 185 

George, Ruth 235, 244 

Georgiadis, James 135, 226 

Gerber, Richard 135 

Gerbitz, Rudy 169, 183, 199, 248 

Gerdon, Ruth 209, 241, 243 

Gergel, Helen 131 

Gfeller, Lloyd 119 

Giannamore, Raymond 128, 234, 247 

Gibbons, George 128 

Gibson, Elwood 139 

Giesse, William 103 

Gifford, Ann 155 

Gif?ord, George 122, 235 

Gifford, Roy 103 

Gilbert, George 126 

Gilbert, JMyron 135, 165, 217, 241 

Gilcrest, Virginia 126, 231, 232 

Gillespie, Janet 45, 56, 86, 103, 110, 212, 217 

Ginter, Rhoda 233 

Ginther, Robert 163, 171 

Girgash, William 137 

Glass, Gene 1S7, 188, 189 

Glauser, Kirkwood 250 

Glide, Eugene 223 

Gloss, Garvin 224 

Gluvna. William 102 

Goddard, ISIadelyn 126, 155, 235 

Godfray, Alyce 232, 244 

Godfrey, Patricia 46, 49, 60, 153 

Goer. Marvin 123 

Goetzinger, Charles 173 

Goldberg, Herbert 165 

Goldsmith, Donald 51, 133 

Goldsmith, Gordon 6, 239 

Goldstein, Kenneth 49, 61, 103, 165, 237, 240 

Goncher, Jean .48, 59, 62, 103, 157, 212, 216, 228, 230, 231 

Goodwin, Robert 223 

Gord, Jerrie 138, 245 

Gordon, Robert 224 

Gordon, Sam 103 

Gordon, Wesley 123 

Gossett, James 103 

Gover, Donna 123 

Gradolph, Alix 223 

Gradolph, Laurel 103, 151 

Graham. George 96 

Grahe. Donald 121 

Grant, George 225 

Graven, Ralph 103, 129 

Gray, Ann 103, 250 

Gray, Gordon 224 

Gray. James 119 

Gray, Lloyd 247 

Gray, Russell 122, 169, 227 

Grazier. Guy 103 

Greaves, Earl 124 

Greaves. William 171 

Green, Frederick 117, 177, 227 

Green. Gilbert 134 

Greenberg, Allen 103, 165 

Greenwald, Harold 128, 223, 226 

Greenwood. Enoch 183 

Greenwood. Frank, Jr 183 

Greenwood, John 81 

Greer. Margaret 161 

Gregor, Ruthann 234 

Grendel, Edward 103, 167, 226 

Grendel, Stanley 103, 16^ 

Gressard, John 171, 230 

Griffin, Daniel 133, 241 



266 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Griffin, June 225 

Griffiths, Harry 138, 173, 221 

Griffon, Marilyn 244, 250 

Gnmaldi, John 129 

Grimm, Ernest 103 

Grimm, Eugene 185 

Gntton, Donald 103 

Groft, George 123, 171 

Grub, Roberta 103 

Grubaugh, Wayne 128 

Grzmcic, Rosemary 119, 221 

Gudenus, William 134 

Gulish, William 137 

Guster, Peter 199 

Guther, Berwyn 133 

Gween, iVIona 133 

Haac, Charles 124, 214 

Haase, William 123 

Hackney, Dorothy 135 

Hadtield, Marilyn 149 

Hadley, Benjamin 250 

Hadley. John 218, 250 

Haggerty, Elizabeth 228 

Hague, Jack 139, 231, 233 

Hahn, Esther 223, 226 

Hahn, Irving 81, 130 

Haig, Lois Spice ^ 96 

Haina, Kenneth 135. 234 

Halas, Edward 86, 224 

Hall, Charles 224 

Hall, Porter 128, 173 

Hallamby. Harriet 250 

Hallock, Helen 80, 81, 130 

Halter, Adelene 149 

Hamilton, Ada 133, 232 

Hammack, J. Alan 55, 57, 217 

Hammer, Robert 135 

Hammond, Jean 123 

Hampf, John 184 

Hamphill, Owen ; 120 

Hampton, Robert 134 

Hamrle, Edward 117, 131 

Hamsher, Edward 247 

Hancock, Clifford 95, 214 

Hanger. Margaret 232 

Hannigan, Gene 234 

Hanninen, Jacquelyn 147 

Hanson. Harry 136 

Hanzel, lerome 219 

Hare, Ri'ta 225 

Harkins, Iris 126 

Harkins. James 126 

Harmon, Alfred . 135 

Harmon, Janet 103, 245 

Harmon. Wanda 147, 232 

Harper. Norma 134 

Harrington, Patricia 126, 234 

Harrington, William 103 

Harris, Donna 51 

Harris, Russell 121. 182 

Harrison. Gene SO, 173 

Harsa. Edward 103 

Harsh. Karl 182 

Harsha, Marilyn 103, 149 

Harsley, Marion 153 

Hart, Agnes 162 

Hart, Carol 45, 237, 240 

Hart. Robert 167 

Hartman, Frederick 125 

Hartman. Philip 45 

Harvey, Joanne 155, 226 

Harya, Thane 134 

Hau. Rita 140 

Haverstock, William 202, 203 

Hawk, Dale 103 

Hawkins, William 126 

Hawlev, Frederick 119, 167 

Hawsman, Russell 104, 163, 177 

Hearn, William 104 

Heaslip, George 104, 167, 236, 240 

Heaslip, Neil 236 

Heckman, Nancy 136, 153, 245 

Heflin, Charles 136 

Hehr. Paul 169, 182 

Heighberger, Robert 173 

Heiks, Nancy 149 

Hein, Roy 127, 169 

Heintz, Willard 104, 241 



Compliments of 

L. A. Herst 

Insurance Agency 

RIDDLE BLOCK NO. 9 ROOM NO. 22 

200 W. MAIN ST. 

RAVENNA, OHIO 

PHONE 8760 or 7407 

INSURE WITH CONFIDENCE 



AUTOMOBILE 
FIRE 



HOSPITALIZATION 
BONDS 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE 



CONVENIENT CORNER 



Emergency Repair 



By Skilled Mechanics 



PHONE 3031 



E. MAIN and LINCOLN 



KENT, OHIO 



267 




HAVEN of REST for your SOLE 
AT 

Minck's Shoe Service 

COMPLETE VALET SERVICE 
140 E. MAIN ST. KENT, OHIO 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Heintz, William 136 

Heiss, Harvey 222, 226 

Heiss, Neil 223, 225 

Helleis, John 133, 183, 247 

Heller, Lois Ann 81, 149 

Helman, Dorothea 123, 147, 218 

Hendee, Richard 80 

Henderson, Robert 104 

Hendricks, Clarence 96 

Henning, Robin 235 

Hennis, Gerald 135, 224 

Henry, Barbara 155, 243, 244 

Henry, Joel 167 

Henry, William 173 

Herbaly, Ruth 152 

Herbert, Ada 244 

Herman, Daniel 224 

Herrman, Betty 154, 155, 232 

Hersman, Robert 127, 204 

Herzog, Francis 124 

Hess, Betty 104, 148, 149, 218 

Hess, Patricia 136 

Hettinger, George 136 

Hettinger, Ruth 127, 155 

Heupel, Doris 104, 150, 151, 209, 212, 218, 231, 24" 

Heupel, Marie 220, 246 

Hewitt, Dale 134 

Hicks, Anita 225, 243 

Higgins, William 233 

Higley, Harry 121, 233 

Hildebrand, Robert 126 

Hildebrecht, Charles 133, 224 

Hiller, Mary Alice 149 

Himeltigh, Hazel 104, 220 

Himes, James 177 

Hirka, June 218, 231, 235, 236 

Hirshberg, Sheila 133 

Hirt, Harold . . . , 104 

Hirzel, Edgar 133 

Hissem, Margaret 122, 244 

Hissom, Orville 96 



Compliments 



of 



Ohio Edison Company 



268 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Hobart, Ellen 149 

Hodson, William 123 

Hoehn, Ruth 46, 48, 104, 157, 219, 231 

Hoffman, William 134 

Hollamby, Harriet 133, 244 

Holland, William 185 

Holland, Mary Lou 46, 49, 60, 124, 157, 244 

Hollingsworth, Carolyn 224 

Hoilingsworth, George 42 

Hollingsworth, Glen 96, 224 

Holmes, Olive 104, 157 

Holp, Frederick 137 

Holvey, George 133 

Holzwarth, William 96 

Honsberger, Laverne I6l 

Hood, Vernon 104 

Hooper, Robert 130 

Hoose, Marv 225, 234 

Hoover, Alice 223, 226 

Hoover, Mary 137, 157 

Hoover, Richard 222 

Hopkins, Charles 131 

Hopkins, Dorothy 104, 244 

Horbaly, Ruth 60, 119, 153, 162 

Horn, Phyllis 151 

Horn, Robert 137 

Horn, Virgmia 137, 157 

Horning, Jean 234 

Hosfeld, Kathryn 121, 234, 246 

Hostetler, Loren 104, 220 

Hostetler, Robert 104, 177 

Howard, Florence 139, 232 

Howard, Joseph 96, 219 

Howard, Roger 127, 217, 241, 242 

Howdyshell, Alvin 139 

Howells, Jonah 135 

Howes, Hubert 128, 214 

Hov, Elizabeth 104, l60, l6l, l62, 212, 219 

Hoyt, Donald 104 

Hoyt, Robert 49, 103, 104 

Hruby, Patricia 224 

Hubbard, Maryann 225 

Hudec, Lois 121 

Hudec, Vincent 121, 214 

Hudkins, lames 104 

Huff, Cecil 104, 135 

Huffman, Joan 151 

Hughes, John 248 

Hughes, Joseph 199 

Hughes, Robert 136, 241 

Hugo, William 104, 213, 231, 236 

Hull, Elizabeth 134 

Hull, Herbert 104 

Hum, Phyllis 104 

Hummer, Roland 225 

Hungerford. Richard 224, 231 

Hungerford, Mrs. Harlan 232 

Hunka, John 226 

Hunsicker, Robert 96 

Hunt, Joseph 135, 177, 250 

Hunt, Warren 104 

Huprich, David 133 

Hurd, Arthur 95 

Hurowitz. John 104, 163, 173, 227 

Husa, George 221 

Huston, James 133 

Hutton, Carl 127, 247 

Hyman, Lucille 121, 155, 220 

Hyser, Howard 173 

Hyser, Raymond 173, 193, 199 

Iddings, Dean 96 

Iberman, Mary 161, 209, 246 

Immler, Mary 133, 232 

Infield, C. Dean 104, 218, 219, 220, 222, 250 

Inscho, Raymond 127 

Irons, Ann 62, 119, 212, 221, 228 

Irwin, Lester 134 

Isenogle, E. Laird 97 

Israel, Alice 104 

Israel, Harvey 165 

Istnick, Edward 124 

Jackson, Mary 117 

Jacobs, John 222 

Jacoby, Donald 139 

Jagmin, Eugene 129, 221, 234 

Jaksic, Milan 104, 227 

Jak-ubjansky. Elsie 136, 151 

James, Helen 135, 232, 244 



S. C. BISSLER 



AND SONS INC. 



Complete 
Home Furnishings 

Corner W. Main 
Gougler Ave. 



Funeral Directors 

Exclusive 

Invalid Car Service 

628 W. Main St. 



Phone 5300 



KENT, OHIO 



KENT'S OWN 

AND 

WELL KNOWN 



QUALITY FEED 

And 
SUPPLY STORE 



FEEDS — 



SEEDS — 



FERTILIZERS 



269 



t 



'ype + ink + 
paper + skilled 
hands = the 
measure of fine 
letterpress printing 



COMMERCIAL PRESS 



INCORPORATED 



Creators • Designers • Producers 



115 S. Depeyster St. Kent, Ohio Phone 3819 



"FOR THE BEST IN FOODS" 

ITALIAN SPAGHETTI 

Our Specialty 

ITALIAN PIZZA — Wed. and Sat. Nights 

FEATURING 
TELEVISION BROADCASTS DAILY 

RAY'S PLACE 



ANDY & 
ROCKY FLOGGE 



135 FRANKLIN ST. 
KENT, OHIO 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

James, June 155, 244 

Jamison, Richard 224 

Janaske, Paul 97 

Jarvis, Leonard 128, 214 

Jeffers, Dorothy 223 

Jeffery, Frank 97 

Jeffrey, C. Gail 95 

Jenkins, Beverly 244 

Jenkins, Claire 153 

Jenkins, Everett 126, 177 

Jenkins, Norma 105, 218, 245 

Jerles, Bonnie 224 , 

Jessel, Marian 95 

Jevnikar, Warren I79 

Jewell, Dorothy 139 

Jilek, Alice 147 

John, George 247 

Johnson, Arthur 105, 222 

Johnson, Carl 136 

Johnson, Carol 130, 244 

Johnson, Edward 133 

Johnson, Ethel 105, 157, 245 

Johnson, Fendell I34 

Johnson, Harry 227 

Johnson, Homer 105, 227 

Johnson, Margaret 149, 232, 244 

Johnson, Mary Lou 6, 48, 130, 151, 246 

Johnson, Richard 117, 249 

Johnson, Russell 171 

Johnson, Sarah 117, 245, 250 

Jonaitis, Eleanor 126 

Jones, Alice 121, 155, 245 

Jones, Betty 1 19, 147 

Jones, Charlene 151 

Jones, Lois 97 

Jones, Louise 128, 222 

Jones, Margaret I39 

Jones A'arilyn 157 

Jones, Robert 105, 173 

Jones, Walter 122 

Jones, William 169 

Jones, Winifred 153 

Jordan, Carl 128, 227 

Juhn, Martin, Jr 81, 133, 169, 227 

Juhn, William I33, 169 

Jurgens, Andrew 138 

Kacarab, George 234 

Kadow, Ruth 105 

Kagey, Donald 133, 177 

Kailan, Hugh 105, 241 

Kaipainen, Viola 223, 235, 241 

Kaiser. Bonnie 130, 150, 151 

Kalb, Helen 81 

Kaley, Herbert 217, 222 

Kaliszewski, Kay 147, 234 

Kallal, Henry 105 

Kallis, Thomas 105 

Kalo, John 124 

Kalstrom, Paul 105 

Kambury, Arthur 1, 135, 175, 222, 243 

Kampfer, Vernon II9 

Kana, Audrey 117, 224, 235 

Kaplan, David 6, 120, 239, 242 

Karantanes, Marion 232 

Kasabach, Alice 245 

Kase, Frank 122, 173, 234 

Kasik, Virginia 241 

Kaskey, William 227 

Katin, Thomas l69 

Kaupinen, Elaine 136, 245 

Keck, Betty Jean 149, 230 

Keefer, John 224 

Keefer, Ralph 97, 250 

Keidel, Carol 157 

Keisler, Martha Lou 135, 159 

Keith, Jennie Lou 135 

Keith, Robert 1S4 

Kelbaugh, Irene 6, 58, 59, 81, 105, 111, 147 

Keller, Geraldine 157 

Keller, Jeanne I53 

Keller, Walter 105 

Kelley, Charles 135 

Kelley, John 105 

Kelsey. Marguerite 245 

Kemp. Joann 122, 216 

Kemp. Wesley 171 

Kendall, William I3I 

Kendig, Charles 133, 235 



270 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Kennedy, Georgia 151, 246 

Kennell, Mary 117,232 

Kenney, George, Jr 173 

Kenngott, Milton 125 

Kenski, James 105, 220 

Kerkhof, Dawn 116, 155, 162 

Kessler, Gloria Jean 105 

Ketchy, George 118 

Khoenle, Ruth 136 

Khoenle, Virginia 118 

Kidd. Robert 6, 123, 238 

Kilbride, Bernard 131 

Kilrain, Patricia l6l 

Kimball, Ralph 105 

Kindle, Charles 105 

King, Barbara 246, 247 

King, John 171 

King, Marian 231 

King, Nancy 138, 153, 155, 221 

King, Robert 136, 173, 248 

King, William 224 

Kingsley, Annagene 137, 157 

Kirk, Gordon 122 

Kirkland, Marilyn 11" 

Kirkpatrick, Donald 128 

Kiss, Julius 135 

Kissack, Edward 137 

Kitchin, Paul, Jr 97 

Klaisner, Fred 169, 204, 247, 248 

Klasgye, Jean 225, 232 

Klein, Carol 122, 155, 244 

Klein, Frank 127, 179, 193, 198, 248 

Klein, Erwin 105, 169, 206 

Klein, Lawrence 124, 183 

Klein, Ruth 105 

Klein, William 129 

Kleinhans, Richard 227 

Kline. Carol 232 

Kline, Dorothy 157, 244 

Klme, lames 179, 206 

Kline, Richard 171, IBS, 189 



HALL S 

Tasty Pastry 

Congratulations To 
1948 Grads 

We wish to thank 

yon for your -patronage 



106 S. Lincoln St. 



5617 



CHESSHIRE HIGBEE 
PHOTOGRAPHERS 



SENIOR CLASS PORTRAITURE 
FOR THE 



1948 Chestnut Burr 



271 



Insurance for all risks 




Howard F. Jennings 



161 N. Chestnut St. 



Ravenna 7111 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Klipsic, Anthony 105 

Klosterman, Joseph ... 1S8, 189 

Klotis, Marilyn 245 

Knabb, Richard 138, 177 

Knapp, Robert 105 

Kne, Dolores 157, 246 

Kneblewicz, Eleanore 105, 147, 232, 246 

Kneifel, Eileen, 161 

Kneubuehl, Dorothy 105, 244 

Kneuer, Ernest 137, 183 

Knight, William 169, 207, 248 

Knopp, Dorothy 120 

Koberna, Franklin 105 

Koby, H 241 

Koch, Sally 81, 151, 230 

Kocher, John 129, 175 

Koenig, "Albert, Jr 129 

Koerlin, Donald 105 

Kofsky, Julian 6, 105, 163, 165, 238 

Kolk, Eleanore 122, 149 

Kolk, Helen 105, 149 

Kolk, Romelda 149 

KoUar, Earl 117 

Konstantinopoulos, Louis 134 

Kot, Leo 131 

Kot, Thomas 105, 196, 197, 199 

Kotis, Marilyn 138, 221 

Kotis, Richard 179, 199 

Kotouch, Wallace 120, 221 

Kotys, Joseph 184 

Koualick, George 182, 194, 198, 248 

Kovasic, Frank 249 

Kovatly, Marzia 241 

Krais, Robert 120 

Kraley, William 134 

Kramer, James 137 

Kramer, John 177 

Kratzer, Daniel 183 

Krause, Verna Dean 128, 223 

Kreider, G. Faye 133 

Kreiger, Ralph 106 



Ca^tee^ CcUuHa you 

Here's a good job for girls with college training. 

It's the job of Service Representative for the telephone company. 

; This career offers you a chance to meet the public and to use your 

i own judgment and initiative. Pay is good and increases come 

rapidly. 

You will be thoroughly trained for this challenging work. You 
will have every opportunity to qualify for higher-paid positions as 
you gain skill and experience. 

If you are friendly, alert, well-poised and tactful, here is a career 
that calls for yo//. 

APPLY: WOMEN'S EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 

THE OHIO BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY 

'^A Good Place to Work'' 



111 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Krent, Eugene 135, 167 

Kress, Robert 234 

Kreyssig, Patsy 244 

Kreyssig, Robert Lee 106, 219, 220 

Kriechbaum, Dora Lee 135, 159, 235 

Knvoy, Wallace 163, 173, 213, 229, 231 

Kromar, Frank 136, 167, 234 

Kropolinsky, Nicholas 133 

Kudrna. Jean 244 

Kuendig, William 106 

Kuhlman. Donna 96 

Kulnitzky, John 134, 167 

Kurtz, Wesley 106, 175, 182, 248 

Kyser, Dona 133 

Kyte, Upson 133 

Lafterty, Charles 106, 179 

Lais. Jane 134, 234, 246, 247 

Lambird, Nancy 153 

Lampe. Melvin 106, 1 18, 214 

Lane, Janice 161 

Langan, James 121, 235 

Lange, Florence 133 

Lange, Kenneth 130 

Lansinger, IMartha 119, 212, 222, 224, 226, 231, 242 

Lanzdorf, Henry 124 

Lanzer, Clarence 139 

Lapunka, John 126, 167, 234 

Laraway, Cecil, Jr 135, 173 

Larsen, Jay .• 137 

Larson, Allan 135, 171 

Lashley, Wanda 106, 212, 217, 219, 241 

Lashley, Warren 120, 217, 231, 241, 242 

Latham, Charles 129 

Lauderbaugh, Martha 97 

Laurenson. John 6, 106, 130, 173, 234, 239, 248 

Laviers, Lawrence 136 

Lawson, Paul 177 

Lazarus. Barry 165 

Leatherman, Joseph 175 

Lee, Barbara 127, 147 

Lee, Isabel 106, 241 

Lees, Shirley 147, 243, 245 

leggett. Charles Dana, Jr 163, 167 

Leggett, Merle 97 

Lehman, Charles 106, 219, 235, 250 

Lei by. Joanne 235 

Leidel. Paul 120 

Leiman, Martin 165 

Lemley, Evan 185 

Lemley, Grace- 106 

Lemrnons, Mavis 48, 49, 106, 153, 221 

Lemon, Jay 185 

Lemponen, Marion 45, 106, 212, 220, 223, 228 

Lenenski. Michael 224, 226 

Lengacher. Robert 6, 106, 173, 220, 236 

Leonard. Frank 51, 120, 163, 171 

Leopold, Dorothy 123, 223, 224, 226 

Lepole, Virginia 232. 24^ 

LeVine. Sanford 183 

Lewis, Arnold 106, 171 

Lewis, Beverly 152, 153 

Lewis, Leona 138 

Leyman, Jean 106 

Li, Hsiao Fang 96 

Liebermann. Sue 6, 139, 239, 243 

Lilley, Barbara 224, 225 

Lilley, John 55, 224, 226. 249 

Limbert, Richard 106. 218 

Lindsey. Lois 226 

Lingruen, Russell 127 

Linn, Robert 135 

Lmtner, George 106 

Lionetti, Harold 97 

Little. Wilbur 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 199 

Livezey, Donald 123, 177 

Livezey. Ralph I38 

Lockbridge, Ira 183 

Lockert. Vernon 242 

Loeblein, William 58, 84, 171 

Logan, Calvin ] 3 1 

Logan, Richard 1 34 

Logan. Russell 125 

Lohrke. Rea Ellen 106, 244 

Lombard. Alice I53 

London, Robert 129 

Loney, Jackson 129, 221 

Long. Helen 134 

Longo, Frank 128 



GREENE And 
KERTSCHER 



110-112 E. MAIN ST. 



RAVENNA 



Shoes iind Accessories for the Whole Family 

DRY GOODS — YARD GOODS — CANDY 
APPAREL 

Two Fine Stores 



ESTABLISHED IN 1910 

IMPERIAL 

DRY 
CLEANING 
COMPANY 

Kent 's Oldest, Largest, 

And 

Best Cleaning Estahlishtnent 



1 13 N. WATER ST. 



KENT, OHIO 



273 



HART, SCHAFFNER AND MARX SUITS 

BERKLEY SQUARE CLOTHES 

MANHATTAN SHIRTS 

WALK-OVER SHOES 

MALORY HATS 

KNOX HATS 



D. H. GREEN, Inc. 

Clothing and Shoes 
137 N. WATER ST. KENT, OHIO 



CIGARS CANDIES 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

STANDARD DRUG 
STORES 

The "Standard" for Pure since 1899 

Conveniently located throughout 

Northeastern Ohio 



MEDICINES 



TOILETRIES 



SODA 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Looney, Berniece 99, 106 

Looper, Ray 123, 171 

Loos. Paul 179, 195, 198 

Lord, Kenneth 137 

Lorig, Robert 135 

Loudon, Millicent 147, 162 

Loudon, Velois 106, 147 

Loughrey, William 130 

Loutizar, Louis 167 

Love, William 137 

Lowe, Mildred 157 

Lower, Marian 106, 155 

Lower, Michael 129 

Luck, Dorthy 106, 217 

Lull, lames 51, 171, 206 

Lumsden, Al 167, 243 

Lustig, Edward 138 

Luthy, Joan 155 

Lynch, Edward 122 

Lyon, John 139, 249 

Lyons, Richard 165 

MacDonald, Robert 56 

McAllister, Charles 247 

McAllrster, Richard 121, 169, 183 

McCabe, Joseph . . 230 

McCaiTerty, Owen 124, 177 

McCaskey, Mary Lou 244 

McCausland, Charles ' 106 

McClain, Melvin 137 

McClellan, Mrldred 97 

McCleman, Frank 177, 183 

McClister, Patricia 133, 244 

McCord, Ernest 137 

McCorkle, Harvey 171 

McCune. Howard 106 

McDermott. Glenn 177 

McDermott, Ralph 175 

McDermott, Thetesa Joan 67, 125, 243 

McDermott, William 136 

McDonald. Robert 81 

McFarland, Glenn 136, 221 

McGinley, Donald 223 

McGinley, Eileen 45, 67, SI, 106, 131, 234, 242 

McGoogan, Albert 106 

McGough, Paul 135 

McGowan, Robert 127, 172 

McGrail, Harlan 6, S5, 106, 214, 221, 231, 238 

McGuire, Mitchell 133 

Mclntire, Victor 182, 199 

McKee, Robert 107, 214 

McKinney, Gene 225 

McLaughlin, Carol 136 

McLean, James 45, 86 

McMiUen; John 13:^ 

McMillen. Lee 138, 223 

McNamara, John 1~7 

McNuughton, James 182 

McNutt, Nancy 10" 

McPherson, Doris 244 

McVay, John 10" 

Mabe, Hubert 126 

Mack, Marlin 107, 16" 

Mackenroth, Louise 107 

Madigan, Mary 234 

Madison, Charlotte 127 

Magee, Robert 5, 84, 107, 231, 239 

Magee, Virginia . . 84 

Maglione, Patricia 149, 246, 247 

Maglione, Ralph 135 

Mahan, Carol 155 

Malaney. Thomas 182, 248 

Mandaltmo, Emil 60, 61, 139 

Manforass. Ethel 245 

Mangione, Andrew 234 

Manning, Neal 124, 177 

iMannino, Joanne 136, 234, 244 

Manthey, Joan 118 

Marburger, Martha 149 

Marion, Constance 246 

Marks, Shirley 151, 239 

Marous, James 135 

Marquardt, Ralph 10" 

Marsh. Mary l6l 

Marshall, Joyce 224, 226, 231, 23 i 

Martin, Bertha 9" 

Martin, Margaret 155, 2-41 

Martin, Nancianne 246, 24" 

Martin, Thomas 133 



274 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Martinelli, Gino 134 

Marty, Kenneth 107, 219, 250 

Marty, Robert 121, 250 

Masin, Mary Lou 132, 133, 155 

Alasin, Richard 133 

Maske, Mary 225 

Masky, Pat 135 

Mason, Rose Ann 151, 244 

Mason, Ruth 161 

Masterson, Richard 185 

Mathews, Paul 137 

Mattews, Paul 234, 247 

Matthews, Ervin 118, 167 

Mauer, Ernest 134 

Maxwell, Donald 175 

Maxwell, June 161 

Maxwell, Otis 97 

May, Eris 118 

May, Leo 107, 234 

Maver, Edward 249 

Mays, Grayce 58, 107, 157, 219 

Meads, Walter 107 

Mears. Donald 107, 250 

Meek. Eleanor 6, 74, 75, 107, 212, 216, 235, 238, 240 

Melhuish, Renna 117, 245 

Melick Jean 81, l6l 

Melrose, Marjorie 129, 245 

Merton, Doris 139 

Mesek, Frank 169, 191, 193, 198, 247, 248 

Messersmith, Joe 6, 135, 236 

Messersmith, William 107 

Messik, Genevieve 107, 244 

Messuri, John 107 

Metcalf, Adelaine 223 

Metcalf, Ann Lee 223 

Meyer, James 107 

Meyers. Edward 215 

Mianowski, Henry 226 

Michael, Dora 155 

Michel. Mary 107, 149 

Middaugh, Richard 107 

Miele, Anthony 234 

Mihalko, Charles 107, 220 

Mihok, Lydia 107, 149 

Mikolich, Frank 135 

Mikula, Phyllis 125, 232, 241 

Miladore, Patrick 122, 169 

Milar. Howard 107 

Mileski, Joseph 182 

Miitord. "lean 149, 231 

Milford, Wade 169, 247 

Milkovich, John 188, 189 

Mdkovich, Mike 187, 188, 189 

Miller, Daniel 165 

Miller. Dorothy 125, 221 

Miller. Harold ' 198 

Miller. Harold 137 

Miller. Jean Louise 124, 134, 221, 232 

Miller, John 107, 118 

Miller, Joseph 136 

Miller. Lee 133 

Miller. Lloyd 124 

Miller. Margaret 107 

Miller, Marilyn 133 

Miller, Mercedes 96, 97 

Miller. Patricia 245 

Miller. R 241 

Miller, Robert E 198 

Miller. Violet 107, 231 2t5 744 

Mills. Ellis " ' 96,' 250 

Mills. George 183, 192, 199, 241 

Misko, Mary 131,219, 250 

Mitchell, Edward 224 

Mitchell. Miriam 153 

Mitrovka. Helen 45, 57, 137, 217, 241 

Mittiea, Antoinette 122, 219, 234 

Mizeres. Nicholas 107 

Moats, Lois 139 

Mocilnikar. Florian 107 

Moeller. Carol 153 

Moher, Mary 108, 244 

Mokodean, George 108 

Mokodean, Michael 108 

Mollica. Joanne 244 

Moodie, Robert 119 

Mooradian. Boghos 198 

Moore, Donald 108, 128 

Moore, Henry 224 



GETZ 



HARDWARE 



BROS. 

Everything in Hardware 

Siierwin- Williams Paints 

and 

Sporting Goods 



132 N. WATER ST. 



PHONE 3121 



HARVE MOTOR 

CORPORATION 

NEW CHEVROLET CARS 
& TRUCKS 

CoiupUments of 

LEE HARVE 



RAVENNA 



OHIO 



275 



For a Meal With Your Friends 
The BEST of Dinners 



KENT RESTAURANT 



Home Baked Pies & Rolls 

Good Food 

QUICK SERVICE 

Hill's and Weida's 

121 E. MAIN ST. PHONE 6414 

KENT, OHIO 



Complirnetits 
of 

RICHARD'S Flower Shop 

Flowers for all occasions 
We telegraph flowers everywhere 

SERVICE GUARANTEED 

1312 N.Mantua St. Phone 3813 

KENT, OHIO 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Moore, Jack 130 

Moore, lay 108 

Moore, John 108, 192, 194, 195, 199, 248 

Moore, Judd 175 

Moore, William 226 

Moran, Joseph 177 

Moran, Patricia 234 

Morar, Virginia 137 

Morehouse, Edna 138, 245 

Moreland, Charlene .' 58, 119, 153 

Morelli, Robert 135 

Morey, Marilyn 245 

Morgan, Frances 244 

Mori, Wade 97 

Moritz, Elsie 108 

Moritz, William 108, 183, 247, 248 

Morley, Leo 234 

Morrell, Jack 136 

Morris, Fay 128 

Morris, John 179, 198 

Morris, Rosemary 117, 232 

Morrow, Robert 125 

Morsch, Kathryn 108 

Morse, Marilyn 149 

Moses, Naomi 126, 220 

Moses, Tom 108 

Moss, Gertrude 123 

Mountcastle, Sidney 135 

Mowery, Richard 183 

Moyer, John 123 

Mroz, Edward 169 

Muir, James 108 

Muldoon, Eugene, Jr 119 

Mulhearn, Catherine 136, 244 

Mullaly, Raymond 108 

Mullen, Dayton 108 

Mullet, Richard 135 

Mulligan, Cathryn 11^ 

Muntean, Rella 108, 218, 220, 235 

Murany, Ernest 134 

Murphy, Frances 58 

Murray, Ray 128 

Musch, Edward 97 

Musick, Lois 59 

Musyt, John 226 

Myeis, Eugene 108 

Myers, Raymond 235 

Myers, Ruth Ellen 235 

Myers, Ruth Margaret 108, 231, 232 

Myers, William L 108 

Nairn, Charles 137, 241 

Nash, Arthur 67, 108 

Nasrallah, Paul 81 

Nawrocki, Loretta 135 

Neff, Gloria 122 

Nelson, Arlene 245 

Nelson, Neal 179, 182, 194, 196, 197, 199, 247, 248 

Nemeth, June 226 

Nestich. Joseph 108, 221 

Nestor, Steve 226 

Netzly, Dwight 108 

Netzly, Howard 108, 171 

Neumann, Paula 139 

Newhouse, Irwin 108, 163, 169. 213 

Newman, Elton 128 

Newsome, Roy, Jr 74, 173, 213, 214, 230, 234, 243 

Ney, F. Gregg 108 

Nielson, Kenneth 135 

Nippier, Robert 120 

Norris, Connie 58, 116, 125, 152, 153 

Norris, Robert 108, 169 

North, James 247 

Nutter, ' Doyle 108 

Nyiry, Dolly 138 

Oana, W. Dan 107, 125, 237, 242 

O'Brien, James 177, 198, 229 

O'Bryant, Fay 244 

O'Connor, Donald 58 

Oehike, Donald 135 

O'Hara, Joseph 173 

Olson, Nancy 224 

Olson, Edwin 135 

Orlikowski, Carol 155, 224, 234 

Orr, Marilyn 161, 224 

Ortt, Clarence 97 

Ossman, Ruth 123, 233 

Osterlund, Otto 184 

O'Toole, William 234 



276 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Ott, Clarence 129 

Ott, Orson 97 

Overholt, Jerry 177 

Ovmgton, John 139 

Pachuta, John 122 

Painter, Jeanette 137, 241 

Palama, Iris 241 

Palmer, William 137, 223 

Palumbo, Dommic 108, 175, 182, 248 

Panasak, Mary 246 

Panasuk, Margaret 138 

Panatzer, Clarence 108 

Pape, Donald 198, 24" 

Pappas, George 109 

Pardee, Bessie 109 

Paris, Kathryn 14" 

Park, Norman 223 

Parker, Glenn 128 

Parmelee, Marjorie 157 

Parrish, Gordon 117 

Parsons, Charles 223, 226 

Partridge, Laverne 126 

Paskert, Richard 127, l69, 182, 184, 196, 198, 213, 247, 248 

Patchen, Martha 157, 162 

Patton, Patrick 229 

Parts, DoUie 134 

Patzer, Roland 167, 224, 225, 226 

Patzwahl, Marilyn 6, 136, 232 

Paugh, Ronald 223 

Paul, Dorothy 153 

Paul, Ruth 225, 244 

Paulson, John 225 

Pavlakovich, George 224 

Pearlman, Murray l65 

Pearse, Marv Helen 149 

Pearson, Myron 231, 233, 241, 248 

Peiper, Paul 167 

Pelfrey, Addie 117 

Pelletier, Edward 135 

Pelley, Harrv 135 

Pelton, George 109, 173 

Pence, Nancy 153, 243 

Peoples, Clarence 135, 216, 230 

Peoples, Leroy 203 

Peragoy, Jane 250 

Perconti, Joseph 109, 169, 248 

Peresta, Andrew 133 

Peretz, Manuel 165 

Perew, Frank 224 

Perez, Clarisa , 123 

Perez, Michael 109 

Perez, Raymond 137 

Perman, Paul 199 

Perme, Raymond 234 

Perry, Jessica 149, 181 

Persons, Donald 137 

Persons, Phyllis 155 

Pete, Albert 127 

Peterman, Shirley 133 

Peters, Marjorie 222 

Petersen, Patricia 225 

Peterson, Arnold 136 

Peterson, Carol 155 

Peterson, Doris 81 

Petit, Bernard 109, 167, 234 

Petti, Carole 225, 234, 243, 245 

Petty, Charles 122, 169 

Petzel. Geraldine 109, 147, 212, 216, 217, 236 

Pfeil, Nancy 221 

Pfinsgraff, Martin 135, 175, 251 

Phillips, Douglas 109 

Phillips, John 130 

Phillips, Nadine 109, 157 

Phillips, Robert 6, 139, 171 

Piastrelli, Mario 109, 175 

Pickett, Dorothy 133, 244 

Piddington, Joan 232, 245 

Pigat, Leonard 182 

Pilati, William 133 

Pimbley, Thomas 129 

Pinkerton, Margaret 109, 155, 162, 232, 244 

Pinkerton, Nancy 155 

Pinkston, Clyde 109 

Pisanelli, Nicholas 134 

Pisani, Joseph 182, 193, 199 

Pistner, William 136, 183, 221 

Plough, Arlo 109 

Pochal, William 138 



Your — 

Hot Point — 
Servel — 

Headquarters 



Portage County' s Largest 
Hardware Store 



MONTIGNEY 
HARDWARE 

1 1 5 E. MAIN ST. RAVENNA, OHIO 

PHONE 7621 



Karper's Cafe 

Compliments of 

Karper's Restaurant 

and Cafe 

FINE FOODS 

and 

CHOICE BEVERAGES 

SERVED 



112 W. MAIN ST. 



KENT, OHIO 



277 



Portage County's Friendly 
Shopping Center 

THE 

WRIGHT 

DEPARTMENT 

STORES 



DON SMITH 

KENT 



AL GOELMAN 
RAVENNA 



LOWRIE RADIO 

SALES and SERVICE 

Authorized Sales — Service 

RCA Victor 

Stewart - Warner 

Emerson — Motorola 

Zenith — Majestic 

Authorized Warranty Service 
Zenith — Motorola — Philco 
Sparton — Stewart - Warner 

Auto Home 

Television 

Drive-in Service 

116 S. DEPEYSTER ST. PHONE 3777 

KENT, OHIO 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Poese, Alan 128, 173, 214 

Pogerzelski, Victor 226 

Polichene, Frank 169 

Polumbo, Dominic 229 

Pompan, Rita 139 

Pompilo, Peter 109 

Pondy, Lois 225, 245 

Pope, Richard 221 

Port, Ernest 117, 131, 234 

Porter, Lois 137 

Portman, Irving 165 

Portman, Walter 223, 226 

Post, Alvin 236 

Post, Beverly 138, 147 

Postlethwaite, Loretta 246 

Poth, Catherine 109, 152, 153 

Potts, Dolores 246 

Powell, Neville 97 

Powers, James 117, 167 

Powers, Robert 109 

Prasek, L 183 

Prebish, John 234 

Prentiss, Margaret 136, 242 

Price, Howard 137 

Price, Leonard 179, 202 

Pnchard, Kathryn 158, 159, 224, 233 

Province, Harold 131, 223, 235, 249 

Province, Phyllis 60, 147, 235 

Provo, Gay 109, 146, 147 

Prusha, George 136 

Pugh, Miriam 109, 212, 217, 241, 246 

Pugliese, Terry 6, 80, 81, 84, 109, 212, 217, 224, 231, 234, 239 

Purdy Esther 96, 219, 220, 250 

Purdy, Ruth 109 

Purgert, Robert 136 

Questel, M. Catherine 133, 222, 223, 226 

Questor, Donald 222, 223 

Quimby, Charles 109 

Quinn, John 109 

Quinn, Paula 135, 250 

Radak, Mary Lou 244 

Rader, Gretchen 138, 155, 244 

Radu, Virginia 155 

Rael, Norman 138 

Ragonese, Alphonse 134 

Rairigh, Robert 183 

Rake. Kenneth 109 

Ralph, June 246 

Raub, Ruth 159 

Raup, Elizabeth 159, 162, 222, 231 

Ravbould, Gwendolyn 119 

Reash, Richard 109 

Reash, Robert 167 

Rector, James 109, 171 

Rector, Robert 67, 109, 213, 215, 227 

Reddrop, Betty 130, 151, 246 

Reddrop, Nancy 151, 230, 244 

Reed, Addison 81, 225 

Reed, Harry 129 

Reed, Max 222, 223 

Reed, Ruth 126, 235 

Reed, Virginia 130 

Reed, Wanda 224 

Reesman, George 250 

Reichard, William 177 

Reichwein, Gordon 167 

Reilly, Eleanor 133, 251 

Reit, Dorothy 225 

Renher, John 171 

Reno, Raymond 117, 214 

Renwand. Donald 163, 175 

Reto. Anthony 120, 169 

Reynolds, Evelyn 147 

Reynolds, Francis 241 

Rhoads, James 109, 163, 177 

Rial, Jane 221 

Ricciuti, Anne 134, 234 

Rice, Dorothy 125 

Rice, Edna 81 

Rice. Glenn 109 

Rice, Gordon 136 

Rice. James 139 

Rice. Mae Jeanne 138 

Rice. Rav 130 

Rice. Richard 6, 140, 238 

Richards, John 120 

Richardson. Willis 124, 227 

Richey. Clarence 97 



278 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Richmond, Jess 11". 

Rickelman, Bernard 169, 183, 

Riegler, Fred 

Rigby, Geraldine 

Rigel, Frances 136, 

Rigel, Everret 

Riggle, Richard 

Riley, Martha 110, 149, 

Riley, Richard 

Rinier, James 

Ritchie, Shelmir 

Ritzman, Fayne 

Robhms, Phyllis 151, 212, 230, 

Robenstine, Roy 

Roberts, Mary 117, 244, 

Roberts, Robert 

Robinson, Arlyn 

Robinson, Elizabeth 155, 246, 

Robinson, Paul 

Robinson, Shirley 

Robinson, Ward 

Roche, Audrey 

Rocko, Jennie 61, 110, 220, 

Roessel, Betty 

Rogalsky, Adam 

Rogers, Gracia , 

Rohaley, Albert 135, 

Rohrer, V. H 

Roman, Virgil 193, 247, 

Romanchuk, Alice 

Romanovich, Dorothy 149, 

Romeo, Frank 134, 

Root, James 

Rose, Dorothy 

Rosenthal, Sidney 

Roshon, Ruby 61, 

Ross, George 135, 222, 

Ross, Julia 159, 

Ross, Linda 

Roth, David 130, 177, 188, 

Rowits, Robert 

Rowland, Ernest 6, 22, 46, 1 10, 

Rowlen, Betty 51, 118, 149, 

Rubin, Alfred 110, 163, 

Rubin. Marvin 110, 

Ruble, Ronald 

Ruckel, Dora 151, 

Rufner, Robert 

Ruggles, Robert 

Runge, Edward 

Rupert, Donald 

Rush, Raymond 

Rush. James Wayne 139, 

Russell, Bettv 

Russell, Fred' 169, 195, 196, 199, 

Russell, Harriette 110, 161, 

Russo. Ignatius 188, 

Rutherford, Betty 

Ruzich. Rudolph 110, 163, 175, 

Ryan, George 

Ryan, Robert 135, 

Rvbak, George 135, 167, 

Ryder, Ethelyn 120, 

Saltsman, Thomas 126, 184, 

Saltsman, William 

Sanders, Warren 

Sanderson, Donald 224, 225, 

Salerni, Julio 

Sanow, Janet 151, 

Santa, Laverne 161, 

Sarff, Curtiss 122, 175, 213, 

Satteson, James 

Sauber, Laurence 

Savako, Roman 

Saviers, William 119, 

Sawyer, Gilberta 

Sawyer, Margaret 122, 147, 218, 234, 

Scadding, Frederick 171, 

Scerback, Clement 

Schaaf. Gerald 

Schaefer, Patricia 

Schaefer, William 

Schall, Paul 

Schaller, Don 

Schell, Sally Lou 

Schenk, William 

Scherer, Ethel 



117, 



133, 
126, 224, 



m 

199 
127 
117 
244 
130 

lis 

220 
110 
122 
157 
110 
231 
97 
246 
110 
136 
247 
121 
161 
173 
110 
234 
133 
133 
243 
234 
110 
248 
153 
226 
247 
134 
110 
165 

no 

223 
217 
161 
189 
60 
239 
237 
165 
165 
185 
225 
135 
110 
126 
126 
227 
224 
244 
248 
247 
189 
161 

214 

234 
171 
226 
151 
248 
138 
118 
235 
138 
243 
244 
2 30 
128 
110 
131 
236 
244 
245 
208 
226 
126 
147 
134 
131 
169 
14" 



The 
City Bank 

of 
Kent, Ohio 

MEMBER 

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE 

CORPORATION 



You'll Be Hard To Beat 
If Your Clothes Are Neat 

LAWRANCE 
CLEANERS 

PHONE 4433 

Send Your Shirts With Your 
Cleaning 



303 N. WATER 



KENT. OHIO 



279 



p. A. Carlozzi 

Oldsmobile - Cadillac 

Most Complete Auto Garage in 
Portage County 

Distributor of General Tires 



RECAPPING 

BODY and FENDER REPAIRS 

LUBRICATION 

WASHING 

MOTOR REPAIRS (all Makes) 

BRAKE RELINING 

WHEEL ALIGNMENT 



330 Gougler Ave. 



Kent, Ohio 



If you want to he seen in 

the classiest I T I n , your hest hets 

m > 

are yi=» .And for good looking 



and matchins: /I 



hit the 



every time. We have them. 



Coe Livingston 



1 10 N. WATER ST. 



KENT, OHIO 



m ARROW SHIRTS and TIES- 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Scherman, Howard 97 

Schick, John 110, 171 

Schilling, Joan 134, 231, 232, 250 

Schipchik, Claudia 48, 110, 226 

Schirmer, Ethel 110, 216, 240 

Schirrman, Johnston 127 

Schlemmer, William 236 

Schlup, Richard 169 

Schmidt, Theron 97 

Schmiedl, Eugene 171 

Schmiedel, Joseph 110, 219, 234 

Schmutzer, Lois 110, 219 

Schnabel, Bernard 134 

Schnauffer, Isla 48, 110, 150, 151, 162, 212, 230 

Schneck, Lois 58, 84 

Schneider, Oliver 44, 110, 173 

Schneider, Robert 110 

Schneider, Wilbur 110, 173 

Schoole, Richard 231, 233 

Schoonover, Harold 121, 182 

Schoonover, Maxine 138, 155 

Schrader, Rosemary 134, 234 

Schramm, Dorothy 121, l6l, 223 

Schroedel, William 221, 241 

Schumacher, John 135 

Shuran, George 175 

Schuster, Rudy 225 

Schwartz, John 110 

Scott, Theodora l6l 

Scourcos, Angeline 117, 158, 159, 218, 236, 243 

Scribner, Marylou 110 

Scullion, Margaret 110, 151 

Scullion, Mary Catherine 140 

Searles, Bert 135, 177 

Sebesta, David 126 

Sedlak. WiHiam 223 

Seese, William, Jr 227 

Seffing, Nancy 157 

Sehringer, Joan 135, 159, 244 

Seitz, William 169, 199 

Sellars, Patricia I6l 

Serbanuta, Alexander 134 

Sercelj, Evangeline 234 

Seruch, Anne 97 

Severns, Robert 130 

Seyler, Arthur HI, 179 

Shaeffer, William 234 

Shaffer, David 222, 223 

Shaffer, Jean 135, 160, 161, 232, 250 

Shaheen, Harry Ill 

Slianower, Don 86, 97, 217 

Sharkey, Bernard Ill, 173, 227 

Sharp, James 81, 217 

Shay, Dorothy Ill 

Shearer, Ethel 225 

Shedden, Robert 173 

Sheets, Everet 97 

Sheets, Mary Lou 244 

Sheets, Robert Ill, 171 

Shelar, Ruthann 6, 111, 221, 235 

Shepherd, Bette 153 

Sherman, Alice 149 

Sherman, Joseph 135 

Sherrets, Gloria 84, 118, 216, 236, 240 

ShiHing, Walter Ill 

Shindledecker, Carol 44, 218, 224, 226, 245 

Shingler, Martha 133, 232, 244 

Shirrilla, John 169 

Shive, Marjorie 97 

Shively, Paul 97 

Shook, Donald Ill, 219 

Short, Mary 97 

Shrimplin, Jack 169, 188, 189 

Shriver, Parlce 173 

Shuba, William 223 

Shubert, Thomas 122 

Shuff, Helen 225 

Shupp, Carolyn 244 

Shuttleworth, William 139, 171, 230 

Siegel, AUene 131 

Silva, Charles Ill 

Simmons, Juanita 137 

Simmons, Patricia 120, 223 

Simon, Howard 138 

Simone, Anthony 124, 160 

Simons, Arthur 118 

Simshauser, Elvin 223 

Simstad, George Ill 



280 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Singer, Richard Ill 

Singhaus, Robert 117 

Sitler, James 138 

Skelly, John Ill 

Skoulis, Alex 227 

Skoulis, Angelo 227 

Slepecky. Michael, Jr 187, 188, 189 

Small, Velma Jean 118 

Smeltzer, Betty Jean 126 

Smerek, Mary 234 

Smith, Alexander 169 

Smith, Andrew 134 

Smith, Charles 231 

Smith, Don 127, 163, 167 

Smith, Eileen Ill, 148, 149, 244 

Smith, Evelyn 147 

Smith, Jeanne 118 

Smith, Mary Lou 122, 155 

Smith, Newman Ill 

Smith, Robert C 223 

Smythe, Robeit 177 

Snider, Leonard 173 

Snodgrass, Nancy 161 

Snyder, Eugene 117, 131 

Snyder, Harvey 124 

Snyder, H. Paul 133, 224, 229 

Snyder, Laurence 131, 182, 247, 248 

Snyder, Marilyn 129 

Snyder, Norman 225, 226, 243 

Snyder. Roy 197, 198 

Snyder, Ruth 134 

Solak, F 182 

Sollberger, Roberta 119, 222, 224, 233 

Solomon, Charles 118 

Sonnhalter, Robert 118. 169, 198 

Sorrels. Helen Ill 

Souers. Millard 97 

Sowry. Janet Ill 

Sparks. John 183 

Sparrowgrove, Eva May 97 

Spechalske, Frank Ill, 169, 198, 213, 247, 248 

Speck, Herman Ill, 177, 183, 214, 227 

Spence, James 235 

Spencer, Marian 126 

Spencer. Tom 139, 231 

Spinetti. Louis 234 

Spisak, Edward 175, 214 

Spohrer, Dale 224 

Sproat, Lee 6, 140, 239 

Sprott, Marjorie 212, 224, 225 

Squires, Robert Ill 

Stafford, Beverly 135 

Stage, ( Mrs. ) Jean 84 

Stage, John 6, 10, 84, 238 

Stahlman, June Ill 

Staib, Margaret 127 

Stanford, Dale Ill, 222, 223, 226 

Stanley, Betty Ill 

Stanley, Edward 138 

Stanton, Russell Ill 

Stark, Ralph 133, 177 

Starrett. John 97 

Steele, James 130 

Steere, Ralph Ill, 123 

Steffy, Robert 131 

Steiger, Janet 139, 224 

Steigerwald, June Ill 

Stein, Charles Ill 

Steiner, Phoebe 99, 111, 149, 212, 224, 244 

Steiner, Sylvia 244 

Stephens, Alice 112, 245 

Sterk, Robert 136 

Steve, Elizabeth 160, 161, 246 

Stevens, Frank 112 

Stevenson, Gerald 97 

Stevenson, Paul 122 

Stevenson, Richard 182 

Stevenson, Robert 182 

Stewart, Charles 175, 224 

Stewart, Elizabeth 131, 222, 235. 244 

Stewart, Richard 112 

Stewart, Robert 112 

Stilenbauer, Carol 151, 208 

Stingel, Aletha 244 

Stith, Lawrence 135 

Stockhaus, Glenn 173 

Stockman, Eloise 161 

Stofcho, Carolyn 149 



CompUmeuts of 

The 
P. L. FRANK 

Lumber Co. 



KENT 



RAVENNA 



CoDiplinieiits of 



CITY PONTIAC INC. 



PONTIAC 



SALES — SERVICE 



Kent 



6515 



281 



THOMPSON'S 
DRUG STORE 

Invites Your Patronage 

Complete 

PHARMACEUTICAL 

DEPARTMENT 

COSMETICS 

TOILETRIES 



CHARLES YOUNG 



MERRILL THOMPSON 



Compliments 
of 

RAVENNA 

HARDWARE 

COMPANY 



RAVENNA 



OHIO 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Stofsick, Joseph 214 

Stofsick, Stephen 127 

Stokes, Thaddeus 249 

Stone, Russell 224 

Stonestreet, E. Jean 118, 154, 155, 220, 224, 232, 244 

Stover, Richard 171, 231 

Strader, Clarence 112, 230 

Straight, Marilyn 112, 219, 250 

Strauss, Bonnie 117, 232, 245 

Strayer, Dwight 137, 234 

Streby, George 112, 220, 247, 248 

Streeter, Betty 51 

Striffler, William 222, 223 

Strong, iVIerle 112 

Stumpe, Albert 118 

Stumpf, William 112, 214 

Sturgil, Denver 118, 215 

Stum, Alberta 149 

Sturrock, James 112 

Stutz, Lois 112 

Sua, Charles 130 

Sudeck, William 112, 169, 204, 247, 248 

Suhayda, Bernard 138, 234 

Sullivan, Patrick 128 

Sumergrad, Stanley 131, 241 

Sutton, Patricia 157 

Swain, Florence 125 

Swan, Lloyd 97 

Swanson, Dolores 224 

Swanson, Germane 135, 171 

Swanson, Owen 123, 227 

Swartz, Don 127 

Sweeney, Paul 169, 192, 194, 197, 198 

Swift, George 227 

Swigart, Nancy 122, 157 

Swigart, Richard 177 

Szalay, Stephan 112, 127 

Szalma, Ernest 234 

Szilagyi, Gwen 112, 245 

Szojak, Ethel 244 

Taberling, George 134 

Taimuty, George 74 

Takacs, James 134 

Talerico, Alfred 133 

Tarchanin, Eleanor 112, 147 

Tarmichael, Gerry 157 

Tauss, Julius A 234 

Taylor, Carol 151, 224 

Taylor, Laurice 112, 232 

Taylor, Leonard 44, 80, 112, 165 

Taylor, Marilyn 84, 85, 137, 153 

Taylor, Rebecca 157, 231 

Taylor, William 117 

Tedrick, Mildred Jean 125, 153 

Teeple, Alice 225 

Tenner, Jay 138 

Tesmer, Grace I6l 

Teter, Naomi 129, 221 

Thies, Larry 112, r5 

Thomas, Anthony 1"5 

Thomas, Barbara 155 

Thomas, Charles 97 

Thomas, Charlotte 161 

Thomas, James E 121, 247 

Thomas, Jane 232 

Thomas, John 167, 213 

Thomas, Lloyd 120 

Thomas, Rachel 125 

Thomas, Ronald 16~ 

Thomas, Wayne 119 

Thomas, Wilbur 63, 97, 219 

Thomas, William l67 

Thomas-Moore, Donald 173 

Thompson, Leroy 201, 202, 204 

Thompson, Norman 16~ 

Thornbladh, Ruth 112 

Thorsen, Siywal 235 

Tiffin, Marvan 147, 24" 

Tilton, Daniel 182 

Timmerman, Margaret 232, 244 

Timmons, Barbara 14~ 

Tischendorf, Alfred 1~3 

Tisevich. Walter 130 

Todeff, William 138 

Tolt, Kay 240 

Tomashiro, Y 241 

Tomasik, Eleanor 122, 149 

Torgler, Lillian 151 



282 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Torgler, Marian 151 

Towner, George 112 

Towner, Robert 123 

Translateur, W. Ernest 1 12, 165 

Trask, Ted 229, 230 

Trautz, Edward 6, 120 

Trautz, (Mrs. ) Stella Totten 6, 48, 120, 239 

Trembly, Irene 112, 232 

Trenta, Frank 112, 225, 234 

Trimble, Kirk 138 

Trimeloni, Blanch 118 

Truelove, Barbara 244 

Truthan, Jordan 122 

Tryon. Irene 91, 112, 147, 245 

Isoucalas, Nickolas l69 

Tubaugh. Robert 112, 219 

Tucker, Ellen 117, 232, 244 

Ulch, Gloria 137 

Uliman, Ingrid 161 

Ulrey, Clarence 129 

Ulrich, Peter 81, 123, 175, 224, 225 

Ulvild, George 169, 250 

Underwood, William 133, 214 

Urban, Joseph 112 

Urchek, Jacob 179, 182, 197, 199 

Urycki. Henry 203, 205 

Vanaman, Clyde 97 

Vance, Arthur 134 

Vandervort, Louella 44 

Vandever, John 127 

Van Gilder, James 169, 247 

Vannucci, Rudolph 133 

Varner, Donald 112 

Varveris, Michael 61, 134 

Vaughan, Kathleen 112, 148, 149, 162, 218 

Vaughn, Charles 113 

Vaughn, Paul 113 

Vendely, Frank 113, 171, 214 

Venetta, Nino 133, 234 

Vey, Elizabeth 121, 246 

Vezie, Eugene, Jr. 173 

Vinciglierra, Michael 173 

V.tale, Vincent 113, 183, 188, 189, 247, 248 

Vitsky, Lawrence 84, 173, 216, 237, 240 

Vogenitz, Richard 120 

Vogt, Christine 154, 155, 232 

Von Kaenel, Robert 169, 184 

Waddell, Thelma 159, 231, 225 

Wade, Lody 147 

Waggoner, Jack 113 

Wagner, Albert 224 

Wagner, Anthony 74 

Wagner, Charles 135 

Wagner, Donald 124 

Wagoner, Sallie 138, 157 

Waidelich, William 122 

Walker, Bruce 173 

Walker, Charles 127 

Walker, Marion 97 

Walker, R.obert 14 

Walker, William H 14 

Walker, William J 134 

Wallace, Robert 135 

Wallis, Frank 167 

Walsh, Ronald 135 

Walters, Kathleen 131 

Walton, John 113 

Waltz, Jeanette 81, 137, 225, 246 

Wample, Genevieve 113, 250 

Wanner, Edmund 113 

Warden. Joan 124, 245 

Warden, John 97 

Warden, Billie Mae 155 

Warman, Donald 213 

Warner. John 113, 183 

Warner, Victor 119 

Warnock, Nancy 161. 245 

Washburn, Harold 113, 175, 214 

Wasil, James 226 

Waters, Sally 223 

Waterhouse, Joan 157 

Waterman, Dorothy 220, 244 

Watkins, Roger 97, 250 

Watson, Alice I6l, 162, 212, 246 

Watson. Fred 1 13, 173 

Watts, Clarence 225 

Watts, Floyd 139 

Watts, Roderick 113 



KENT FUEL 
And SUPPLY CO. 

Massey-Harris Farm Implements 

Building Materials 

Garden, Lawn Equipment 

Coal, Fertilizers 

Willys Jeeps, Cars and Trucks 



821 WATER ST. 



KENT, OHIO 



Victor, Coh/n/b/a, Decca, 
Capitol Records 



PHONOGRAPHS, INSTRUMENTS 



MUSIC 



Gifford's Music Shop 

244 W. MAIN ST. 
RAVENNA — DIAL 761} 

^'Yotir Friendly Aii/sic Store" 



283 



The 
T. G. PARSONS 

Lumber Company 

Dealers iu 

CURTIS MILL WORK 

MASONITE PRODUCTS 

ROOFING — LUMBER 

INSULATION 



FRANKLIN AVENUE 



PHONE 4512 



KENT, OHIO 



J. L. HORNING 

DODGE — TRUCKS — PLYMOUTH 
SALES — SERVICE 



KENT, OHIO 



PHONE 4222 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Weager, Phyllis 151 

Webb, Kenneth 171 

Webb, Lois 113, 218, 233 

Weber, Charles 130 

Weber, James 117, 222, 224 

Webster, Sheldon 169 

Wedewen, Roberta 157, 225, 243 

Weekley, Alvin 99, 113, 236, 243 

Weigand, Glenn 113 

Weimar, Janet 113, 149, 220 

Weinke, Carl 177 

Weir, Gerald 113 

Weir, William 182. 248 

Weiskopf, William 165 

Weiss, Charles 165 

Weiss, Marjorie 232 

Weissfeld, Edward 165 

Weissfeld, Victor 165 

Weissgarber, Martin, Jr 134 

Weisz, George 97 

Weitzel, Paul 167 

Welker, William 97 

Weller, Mary 243 

Wells, Kathryn 127, 147 

Welsh, Thomas 175, 229 

Welshans, June 244 

Weltner, Carol 81, 133, 153, 244 

Wendelken, Laura 149 

Wendelken, John 74, 173, 231 

Wendling, Nita 150, 151 

Wenger, Richard 169 

Wentz, Robert 163, 169, 213, 216, 230, 236, 240 

Wernheimer, Robert 118 

West, Mary 157 

West, Patricia 222, 223, 224, 226, 231 

Westin, George 222 

Weymueller, Robert 115, 134, 173, 236 

Wheatley, Irvin 169 

Wheeler, Sallie 157, 243 

Whipple, John 128 

White, Doris 139, 244 

White, Donald 198, 227 

White, Dorothy 244 

White, Elaine 7 136, 224, 244 

White, George 138 

White, Henry 137 

White, Robert 50, 1 13, 231, 243, 251 

White, Ronald 135 

White, Thomas 136, 177 

Whitehead, Charles 119, 222, 223, 226 

Whiteman, Paul 138 

Whitemyer, Ross 127 

Widdows, Jacqueline 225, 232 

Wiegand, Evelyn 244 

Wiese, Donald 134 

Wiese, Merle 138. 175 

Wigley, Edmund 136 

Wiland, Charles 175 

Wilber, Martha 158, 159, 209, 224 

Wilde, William 130, 177 

Wilder, June 157, 244 

Wildhorn, Hyman 135 

Wildman, Dorothy 223. 226 

Wilhelm, John 132, 135, 175, 198 

Wilhelm, Robert 120 

Wilhelm, Thomas 179, 197, 199, 248 

Wilkes, Doris 113, 212, 246 

Wilkins, James, Jr 121, 219 

Willgohs, Charles 171 

Williams, Robert 133 

Williams, G. William 113, 249 

Williams, George Walter 117, 223 

Williams, Gertrude 153 

Wilhams, Judy 15" 

Williams, Katherine 113, 218, 245 

Williams, Margaret 9" 

Williams, Max 113, 215 

Williams. Roberta 119 

Wilhams, William L 80, 129 

Williams. William A l"? 

Williamson, Leota 232 

Wilms. Marilyn 113, 219, 250 

Wilson, Betty 131 

Wilson, Donald 139. 184, 185, 248 

Wilson, George 136 

Wilson, Ralph 188, 189 

Winick, Doris 113 

Winkelman. Donald 22? 



284 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Winner, DeForest 137 

Winslow, Douglas 63 

Winsper, Roy 169 

^X'i^ter, Betty 6, 84 

Wirth, Shirley 113, 156, 157 

Wise, Donald . ^ 113 

Wise, Harry 167 

Wise, James 129, 250 

Wise, Janell 113, 244 

Wise, John 129, 130 

Wissler, Robert 134 

Witt, Gloramae 136, 244 

Witten, Donald 133 

Wohlford, James 224, 249 

Wojciak, Edward 167 

Wojno, Walter 184, 185 

Wolcott, John 128, 173, 229 

Wolcott, Patricia 149 

Wolcott, Robert 175 

Wolf, Waiiam 114, 169, 219 

Wolte. Jeanne 134, 147, 237 

Wolfe, Richard 114, 169, 183, 192, 198, 227 

Wolfe, Sanford 183 

Wolfe, Walter 114 

Wolfgram, Howard 193, 194, 195, 199, 248 

Wollenslegel, Eugene 221 

Woodbridge, Shirley 155 

Woodson, Gilbert 177 

Woodson, Glen 133, 177 

Woodward, Lois 81 

Worden, BiUie Mae • 133 

Workman, William 81 

Wrentmore, Donald 114 

Wrentmore, Jane 116, 125, 153 

Wright, George 114, 214 

Wright, Robert 139 



When in need of 



Good Things 



To eat . . 



SHOP AT 



LONGCOYS 

FOOD 

MARKET 



124 S. WATER ST. 



KENT, OHIO 



- 60-Second Counter Service - 

Bill's Diner 

— across from Kent Post Office — 

offers 

• Good Clean Food 
• Clean Surroundings 
• Clean Service 

Full Course Meals at — 
Morning, Noon and Evening 

Short order Menu 
24-Hour Service 

Everything that's good in eating 
at moderate prices 

CHARLES H. NAY, OWNER 



HUDSON Cars 

Reo Trucks 
Sales - Service 

GENERAL REPAIRING 
BODY & FENDER PAINTING 

Weiss Motors 

END OF N. WATER ST. KENT, OHIO 

PHONE 4713 



285 



FOR - - 

Quality Coal 

Building Material 

Ready Mix Cement 

Dial 4531 

HORNING BUILDERS 

Supply & Coal Co. 



113 LAKE ST. 



KENT, OHIO 



STUDENT INDEX, Continued 

Wright. Ruth 250 

Wuest, Ralph 138, 177 

Wyatt, Joseph 114 

Welker, Wilham 97 

Yamokosly, Stanley 114 

Yeadon, Virginia 151 

Yearkey, Marian 155 

Yingst, Sarah 58, 59, 130 

Yoak, Harold 120 

Yoak, Harry 199 

Yocum, Sue 155, 247 

Young, Eileen 118, 154, 155, 218, 232 

Young, Galen 97 

Younker, Elva 244 

Yount, Betty 1 14, 147 

Zaludny, Joseph 125, 169 

Zapka, Marian 114, 146, 147 

Zengler, Robert 120 

Zents, Bernard 249 

Zesiger, Jeanne Rae 151 

Zetts. Alexander 61, 139 

Zevalkink, Richard 124 

Zika, Eleanor 114, 221, 224 

Zilla, Margaret 46, 124, 153, 243 

Zima, Frank 125, 175, 234 

Zimmerlin, Donald 3 

Zimmerman, Mary 97 

Zimmerman, Richard 1~5 

Zingery, George 114 

Zingery, James 114 

Zittlau, Emma -. . 126 

Zogg, Marcelline 151 

Zsiga, Joseph 119 

Zucker, Anne 244 

Zuskv, Paul 226 



Year in and Year out 
KSU Students 
Have fun 
And get 

Good exercise 
Bowling 
At 



KENT'S 

BOWLING 

CENTER 

PROP.: W. C. "POP" MYERS N. WATER ST. 
PHONE 3033 KENT, OHIO 



Compliments 



of a 



Friend 



286 



J-kc J—^i^^i ^.-^^^'^ ^ents l^Uattli 



SPRING and graduation come rolling around the corner, and another Chestnut Burr 
is "put to bed" to record a full year in the chronology of growth of Kent State Uni- 
versity. The pleasant part about the finish of such a large project lies in the fact that the 
editorial and business staffs can forget most of the work and relive the fun of companion- 
ship for years to come. 

The typewriters have slowed down in the Burr office, but they haven't stopped, for 
even before the 1948 edition is complete a new crop of workers has begun on the 1949 
book. My hope for the new staff is that they may have as excellent cooperation from the 
administration, faculty, and student body as we have experienced, to aid them in pro- 
duction. 

The year in retrospect would show innumerable personalities who have contributed to 
the book. My special thanks go to those who held out to the end to complete the details 
which take the rough edges from the raw product. 

Sincere appreciation goes to Carleton J. Smyth, publications supervisor, Frank Kwett 
of Northern Engraving Company, Ralph Gross of The A. L. Garber Company, W. C. 
Sims of the S. K. Smith Company, and William Partridge of Chesshire-Higbee Photog- 
raphers. 

Plaudits are also due to Bob Magee, Business Manager, and his staff, Dave Kaplan and 
John Laurenson, for keeping the supply lines moving in the office and the darkroom. 

As Assistant-Editor, Marion Cole carried a heavy share of the burden of copywriting 
and did an unusual job of filling in the production gaps when they developed. The good 
spirit of her co-workers, Audrie Fornshell, Eleanor Meek, Anne Domiter, and Phil 
Dempsey, made the small office of the early part of the year a more pleasant place in 
which to work. 

Harlan McGrail, Art Editor, left in March for a job in Iowa after completing his 
studies, but the record of his work remained on campus with many pages of the Burr. 
Sue Fletcher put in several months of skilled work in scratch board technique to finish 
the striking fly-leaf, and Julian Kofsky executed the sketches appearing through the book. 
Freshman Dick Rice reproduced most of the group insignias to earn a place on the staff. 

Most students of the University are familiar with Chief Photographer, Dick Arnold, 
who appeared at countless meetings, dances, picnics, and other school affairs to record 
the events. Though verbal thanks are always inadequate, they are gratefully extended to 
Dick and his staff. Bob Kidd, Ernie Rowland, Doris Carpenter, Don Goldsmith, Bob 
Phillips, and Roger Baele. 

Special merit award could well go to a newcomer to the University this year, John 
Stage, who is responsible for the unusually excellent job of photography in the faculty 
section and the montages in the Greek section. 

And all the while Stella Trautz and Terry Pugliese, working as staff secretary and 
photographic secretary, pushed their jobs to peak importance by keeping the behind-the- 
scenes details in order. Working with them and helping wherever and whenever they 
were needed, Betty Winter, Sue Liebermann, Lee Sproat, and Bud DelVecchio often added 
the starch to a wilting problem. 

Thanks, too, to Bob Weymueller for the help over the last hump of the year as the 
Burr was completed. 

The long hours of work have not made it an easy year for the staff, but our experience 
has been on a worthwhile plane, I have personally enjoyed very much the companionship 
of the staff members and consider it an honor to have worked with them. The physical 
and cultural progress of the University often causes me to feel that I was born at least 
five years too soon, I hope that the Chestnut Burr will always maintain the tradition of 
pushing ahead — 

as the columns move on in the darkness. 

The Editor 



287 



1948 CHESTNUT BURR 



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